Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,898   Posts: 1,521,068   Online: 969
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    Brac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    625
    Quote Originally Posted by Petzi
    There is no way it would be dated 2007 if it really was XRG. The XRG film was discontinued years ago.
    Ever since Lidl opened their local store near me (around 1999) they have been selling this twin pack offer of 2 rolls of XRG200 for £1.99 for the two. I'm aware that XRG ceased to be on general sale years ago but my guess is that Agfa supplied Lidl with an earlier emulsion than Vista as an economy line. Similar Kodak has it ColourPlus 200 and Kodacolor VR lines (the latter in Aldi stores & now made in China) & Fuji has a CA 200 economy line (not Superia) which sometimes pops up - for instance it was given to me as a "free film" when I had some films processed in Cyprus last year.

    Going back to the XRG film in Lidl, the last I bought about 3 weeks back had an expiry date of March 2008. No doubt Lidl had a contract with Agfa and the film was produced up to the time Agfa finally called a halt. Today when I was in my local Lidl's I couldn't see any so I guess they have now sold their last stocks (though other branches may have some)

  2. #12
    Petzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Europe
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    857
    Agfa had one coating facility in Leverkusen, and I don't see why they would specially produce an outdated item for Lidl. There is just no reason for that. Agfa had really big coating machines. Coating a special film for Lidl would have meant extra cost, not cost savings.

  3. #13
    Brac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    625
    Quote Originally Posted by Petzi
    Agfa had one coating facility in Leverkusen, and I don't see why they would specially produce an outdated item for Lidl. There is just no reason for that. Agfa had really big coating machines. Coating a special film for Lidl would have meant extra cost, not cost savings.
    The truth is neither of us really knows what it is, but as Kodak Fuji & Konica-Minolta (its VX series) produced "outdated" (ie earlier) emulsions as economy lines there seems no logical reason why Agfa should not have done the same. The giant Asda supermarket chain in the UK (much much bigger than Lidl) also used to have very cheap Agfacolor films until a few months back (ISO200 & 400) which was not marked Vista (or XRG come to that). I wonder what they were?

    A further interesting point is that though Agfa purchased the "Perutz" concern in Munich decades ago, they retained the brand and ever since they continued to produce films under the Perutz label (and with the Munich address on the cartons though I accept they were probably coated elsewhere). In the UK though not frequently found, the Perutz films were always sold at cheaper prices than the Agfa. As I write I have 3 rolls of Perutz Primera Color 200 (24exp) in front of me with a June 2004 expiry date. It's difficult to believe this is Vista film - why would Agfa compete against themselves?

  4. #14
    Petzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Europe
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    857
    The production of film greatly benefits from economy of scale. Agfa had only one big production plant as I said earlier. Kodak have plants around the world, where they may use older machinery and older processes. For them it may make sense to produce older materials. In the case of Kodak, the cheap film comes from China. On a side note, the Kodak VR film was the predecessor to Gold film, I remember when Gold film was introduced, but I think that was like 20 years ago. It seems unlikely to me that the VR film sold today is still the VR film from back then.

    In the case of Agfa however, all films came from the same machine. Agfa was big in all kinds of generic or "house" brands. If you saw a film not labeled Kodak, Fuji, Agfa or Konica, it was most likely Agfa.

    These circumstances, together with the fact that AgfaPhoto have stated that the recently sold XRG film is actually the latest Vista film, speaks for the assumption that it really is Vista film. Anything else would not make commercial sense, because there are probably no cost savings for Agfa in selling old emulsion. Rather, it would cause extra cost.

    It does not mean competing with oneself, if the same product is sold in two different packages at two different prices to two different markets or retail chains.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin