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  1. #21

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    If the sale was based on a projection that the consumable market in xrays would rapidly shrink, as camera film did, then it was probably smart to get as much for it as possible. Repeated sales of consumables (chips, paper, ink) is the cash flow; Or you have to sell updated equipment as often as possible. The problem is, R&D is expensive just from the standpoint of the new equipment that has to be manufactured to manufacture the stuff your selling. It seems that the choice was not to stay in the overall health market outside their investment in microprocessors, and perhaps software systems another money maker with repeated sales. It was definetly a positioning move to reduce the debt which can be the death knoll for a company. Nobody likes people who can't pay their bills and that effects anyones continuence in any market. Trying to get loans to finance new products when you can't pay your existing bills will kill you fast.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by gr82bart View Post
    Look, people aren't even being rational here any more. We're talking x-ray films and people are questioning how long E-6 chemistry will last. It boggles my mind how 2 + 2 = 5 on APUG. Truly.

    I never equated E-6 with x-ray materials, I merely expressed my hope that it will continue to be available. Given EK's recent (and not so recent) history I think it's a pertinent question. Whether it will or not will only be told in time. I'm afraid your boggled mind, rationality questions and fuzzy math problems are something you will have to solve on your own.

  3. #23

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    There is probably a bigger insentive to Kodak of transferring over 8000 employees. Consider the potential of future retirement or serverance checks, and eliminating 8000 employees can really help them in the future. Kodak spent tons of cash to become a major player in the commercial printing and graphics supply world, and this sale will help pay off the debt of buying several companies. Commercial printing is the growth industry for them, which is easy to tell when you read the SEC reports from Kodak. However, the public perception is still that of a consumer film company, despite that less than half their revenues have come from consumer films in well over ten years.

    So how does this affect my photography? Not at all. I can still purchase E100VS, E200, TriX, TMX, and several other films that I use. I have no desire to dump my usage of Kodak products simply on the basis of what they do with other divisions.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  4. #24
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    How does this affect us. Not at all.

    But, see my post in the doom and gloom forum about the layoffs and sale of buildings that was announced the day before this sale.

    PE

  5. #25

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    Hopefully when the end comes they sell off their film units instead of just shutting them down like they did with B&W paper.
    art is about managing compromise

  6. #26
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by uraniumnitrate View Post
    The fact is that Kodak did it right! Sell out untill they can get money for it! In this country there is isn't any institution still uses X-ray units based on the traditional film method as all is digital! Well maybe some 65 years old dentists still may use those but, they not gonna be around for long do they?
    One of the things that struck me last time I had an MRI (2-3 years ago) was that the image was stored on film. Given that MRIs have always been a digital capture technique, the choice of recording medium would imply that this portion of the market has a significant future. The last CAT scan I had was also recorded on film, but that was some years earlier. As for the 65 year old dentist, mine is only in his late 40s, and still uses film. Frankly, I dread the day someone tries to replace the bite wings with a digital sensor, because I can't imagine how one could fit more easily into my mouth than the film version, which is uncomfortable enough.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP View Post
    Frankly, I dread the day someone tries to replace the bite wings with a digital sensor, because I can't imagine how one could fit more easily into my mouth than the film version, which is uncomfortable enough.
    My dentist uses digital and it's just as uncomfortable.

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    It's not "doom and gloom" to be aware and concerned about disturbing trends.
    George,

    It is when you've interpreted and communicated the trend as "disturbing" when, maybe it isn't?

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP View Post
    One of the things that struck me last time I had an MRI (2-3 years ago) was that the image was stored on film. Given that MRIs have always been a digital capture technique, the choice of recording medium would imply that this portion of the market has a significant future. The last CAT scan I had was also recorded on film, but that was some years earlier. As for the 65 year old dentist, mine is only in his late 40s, and still uses film. Frankly, I dread the day someone tries to replace the bite wings with a digital sensor, because I can't imagine how one could fit more easily into my mouth than the film version, which is uncomfortable enough.
    I were talking about my dentist he is an old guy and still uses the old one but the next year he going to get retired and than he’s closing down or sell his practice. I don’t know much about how other dentists have! I don’t even know a lot about their equipment! What I do know is more like heavy duty industrial X-rays and medical X-rays used in hospitals with a very thin sensors! They are all digital in this country! You know this country is very high tech and a change goes rapidly! I can think of some places they might still using analogue but not many that’s for sure. Mostly in vetriner (animal)hospitals.
    I know so much that the sensor is not that large in size at all! So probably you are going to get it in your mouth! :-)

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by gr82bart View Post
    My dentist uses digital and it's just as uncomfortable.

    Regards, Art.
    :-) Jut a thought of getting to the dentist is uncomfortable! isn't that right? :-)

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