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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by r-s View Post



    If you care at all about your privacy, you will do whatever you can to avoid being profiled, "e-pended", and otherwise "owned" by third parties, and, with the laws being passed these days -- and the "rules" made of whole cloth in the absence of laws -- your "profiles" will end up in govermnent databases. It's happening as we speak.

    And for the "If you're not doing anything wrong, you have nothing to hide" crowd, um, may I look up your skirt? Or better yet, at your credit card statement?

    I'm not doing anything wrong -- yet, for some odd reason, I dislike the idea of ANYONE following me around with his nose planted up my tailpipe, taking notes as he follows me around. Go figure.

    (It used to be that privacy meant something -- and, the desire to maintain one's privacy was considered a normal trait, not "suspicion of subversive intent"!)
    That is why companies are so aggresive in promoting digital in first place. Bigger options to control and invading privacy that is. I mean digital in general, not only in photography.
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
    No things in life should be left unfinis

  2. #42

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    Somewhat related story...

    While I was at the dentist a few weeks ago, I had to get some Xrays done of my teeth. The dentist office was using new digital Xrays to take the images so they would appear on a computer screen right in front of me when taken.

    I actually though this was a pretty great idea and was interested in the process.

    However, right after taking the last Xray, the dentist went over to the computer, only to find the mouse was frozen and he could not do anything on the computer! He had to hit the POWER button the on computer, causing all my Xrays that were just taken to be lost, so they had to be redone.

    Lesson learned-

    Film never freezes up, crashes and randomly desides to erase itself!

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan McIntosh View Post
    Somewhat related story...
    However, right after taking the last Xray, the dentist went over to the computer, only to find the mouse was frozen and he could not do anything on the computer! He had to hit the POWER button the on computer, causing all my Xrays that were just taken to be lost, so they had to be redone.

    Lesson learned-

    Film never freezes up, crashes and randomly desides to erase itself!
    Woah, what a screw-up... Working in the medical industry, I'd say this is a major case of incredibly bad workflow. He should have learned to save the images to a special archiving system before doing anything with it. This is done automatically, usually.

    That said, I'd rather have another low-dose x-ray because someone lost my digital images than get another three high dose x-rays because the first two were underexposed and the third was underdeveloped. Happened to me, back in the dark ages... For one film x-ray back then, I could now have over 100 digital ones and acquire the same amount of radiation.

    From a radiation point of view, digital is a breakthrough in medical imaging. As much as I like film, this is a matter of health, and here, digital imaging simply enables things that have not been there before. Like high-resolution heart exams during in a cath lab. Or x-raying pregnant women. Or like reducing the radiation exposure of medical personnel significantly. Or having the patient's scans in the exam room immediately, even if his last x-ray was two years ago, without having to send someone down into the cellar to retrieve the film out of a box with a barely legible hand-written label on it.

    I still know people who were involved in the development of sheet film changers for angiography. When doing an exam in a catheter lab (like imaging the heart coronary arteries), sheet film was used and dozens of sheets had to be changed quickly to produce something like a movie afterwards. Now you can see the arteries during the treatment live... and the physician knows exactly what he pokes that catheter into.

    Let's enjoy film for art, but let medical go digital... I won't shed a tear.

    Antje

  4. #44
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    Long live the Schonander!
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    Long live the Schonander!
    Ah, I see you are a connoisseur!

    Antje

  6. #46
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    Kodak became very funny company. They just do not know what they are doing. I hope soon they will stop to fly wings up-side-down.

    www.Leica-R.com

  7. #47
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    Digital Radiography and image archiving systems are a major advance in healthcare. But it is a kick in the groin when the server goes down. Still, it always comes back up, and no idiot resident can cart off important and irreplaceable films in his trunk anymore.
    I was once treating a patient in Radiation Therapy when everything came to a stop because the beam films were missing. Later we learned that one of the residents had the films in the trunk of his car. The joys of working in teaching hospitals.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  8. #48

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    Gees, Curt, losing port films! Now that's scary. I bet the dosimetrist was going nuts.

    K.

  9. #49
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    Not as mad as the Attending who reamed the resident a new a** hole for causing the patient a delay in treatment.

    One of my saddest experiences with a resident was one who was cursing about a patient who was late for treatment. He finally ordered a call to the floor to find out why the patient was late. The secretary came out and said the patient has just died. Or the five year old girl who died from a brain tumor. I have a careers worth of these experiences. It makes disturbing news from Kodak a lot less important in the scheme of things.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

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