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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by arigram View Post
    We just need to organise a huge conferance where the youth of today is hand picked to select the most intelligent, athletic and sexually vigorous of them, then impregnate them....
    I like that plan, and would volunteer to help, but my g/f would not be happy with it.

    Being serious, I always figured home-coated glass plates and 8x10 or 4x5 would be my fallback position, and that film would transistion into a hobby like oil painting is now, ie, ready-made chemistry instead of people mixing stuff from scratch.

  2. #12
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    I do not hoard film at this point. Divided over three locations and two formats I have about three "bricks" worth. All of it current dated.

    While I'm not to confident about the future for film - I don't think it's time for a "bunker mentality" yet.

  3. #13

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    I think that schools should be encouraged to keep teaching analog photography, as a basis for the art, rather than jumping directly into digital, and they should not bow to pressure to start with digital. I think it would be well agreed here that if you know analog photographic methods, then the transition to (or addition) of digital techniques are easier to master. If you only know digital, then it is a steeper learning curve to embrace analog.

    The problem is that the camera retailers make more profit from digital cameras, because even with the same markup as analog, in general consumer digital cameras sell for more than their analog counterparts, and thus a higher dollar amount of profit, as well as all the large vendors of cameras are truly only pushing their digital products. From the vendors standpoint, they can sell a new camera to the same consumer every few years with digital, as new models obsolete older models, whereas with analog, the "need to upgrade" was far less, resulting in far fewer units sold.

    For analog to survive, it has to have a public awareness that can only come from teaching, with support from the industry.

  4. #14

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    The "art world" of painting and drawing has not diminished in size, just because there are other ways of creating an image. Just a statement for pondering.

  5. #15

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    Photographic supplies and equipment production are a "profit" oriented business. Art Supplies are a "profit" oriented business. If analog photographic materials can make the volume of profit to sustain them, then analog photography will survive. Unfortunately I know of no manufacturer that makes goods as a charity, nor can I think of one single government body that would underwrite the analog photographic industry as a charitable support for the "art".

  6. #16
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    Making a paint or buying canvas and stretching it for an oil painting is far easier than making an emulsion and coating it in the darkroom. But you don't have to be an engineer to do either.

    The big difference is that there are a lot of sources for learning how to make the paints and stretching the canvas, but few on making and coating gelatin. In fact, Silver Gelatin is out of print and it was the only relatively current book on the subject that I know about. That delineates the current level of interest to some extent here.

    PE

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    The problem is that the camera retailers make more profit from digital cameras...
    Not according to any retailer I've spoken too. High cost of stock; rapid depreciation of stock (as a result of new models); very low mark-ups...

    None of it adds up to the sort of revenue (NOT profit) which even allows you to pay a half-sensible wage to half-competent staff.

    Cheers,

    R.

  8. #18

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    Well, I would collect children in puberty/teenage years. Then will start to tell them how digital is great. And in schools teachers to start telling same thing. And then I would hope that normal teenage rebelion against parents/teachers/authority would do the job...

    Now, seriously, I have meet lots of young people who find photography, especially b/w prints very interesting, arty, sexy. And some of them would like to practice photography as hobby. But, when I try to "push" them forward, they say despite all that they would use digital imaging. They won't mess with chemicals, and they think digital is cheaper, that is afordable to them. So, I don't know if there is any hope. Especially here, here we can't buy almost anything in shop. Everything must be ordered from abroad, and that is for those youngsters too complicated, not "cool", expencive. And they feel they are not trendy, imagine 15years old with Yahshica MAT in group of friends which have digicams with all theire lights, sounds and stuff... And when that digimaker make photo of girl he like and print to her that photo in pocket size printer in few seconds, that other poor kid tells her: sorry I must first develop film, make print, wait a day or two... Who do you think will have more sucsess with girls (same for girls photographers)

    On the other hand this Yashica kid can invite her into his darkroom...

    Seriously, I do what I can, that is try to promote photography as much as I can, trying to explain why I think it is worth of preservation and why I prefer it over digital imaging. That is all I can to do... No, I lie! I should try with NGO to make some course of photography, not only how, but why photography and not digital imaging...
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
    No things in life should be left unfinis

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Making a paint or buying canvas and stretching it for an oil painting is far easier than making an emulsion and coating it in the darkroom. But you don't have to be an engineer to do either.

    The big difference is that there are a lot of sources for learning how to make the paints and stretching the canvas, but few on making and coating gelatin. In fact, Silver Gelatin is out of print and it was the only relatively current book on the subject that I know about. That delineates the current level of interest to some extent here.

    PE
    Then perhaps the answer is that photo classes include creating emulsions.

    Or that more people who can create emulsions, teach how for a price.

    Spread that emulsion knowledge around, get people tinkering, creating people who are "skilled in the art" as the patent guys say, so that the demise of film at the retail level isn't the demise of emulsions from the home workshop.

  10. #20

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    I'm not a painter, so I could be wrong, but painting supplies aren't perishable while film and paper are perishable. That means that paint manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers don't have to toss out dated paint, brushes, canvas etc. while the same can't be said for the photography supply chain.

    Personally, every time I finish shooting a box of 4x5 or 8x10 film I buy two boxes. I guess you would call that hording, but I see it as a way to SLOWLY build up a supply of the products I use without breaking the bank.

    I've also tried to teach B&W photography to my two teenagers. They took a summer workshop a few years ago that exposed them to photography, developing film and making their own RC prints. Once the workshop was over the kids showed very little interest....that was probably 3 years ago. My son took a photography course in high school last spring and when he finished the course, I purchased he and his sister nikon 35mm cameras and we took a photography trip to Shenandoah National Park for 3 days after school let out for summer break. Once those images were developed and printed my son put his camera on the shelf and hasn't picked it up sense. We also made a stop at a museum to see an Ansel exhibit last summer. We were on a trip anyhow, so the stop only added 2 hours to our day. My son and his sister would much rather take a photo with their phones!!!!

    I'm open to suggestions on how to motivate kids to do B&W photography. I think the thing to do is to expose them to the processes and then just hope they pick it up. If we force them, then they will never develop a love for the medium.

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