Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,974   Posts: 1,558,732   Online: 803
      
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 55
  1. #41
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,228
    Images
    65
    These heavy metals are not very toxic AFAIK, and include salts of Rhodium, Iridium and Osmium. They are used in very low quantities, but are very expensive.

    PE

  2. #42
    Chazzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    South Bend, IN, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,865
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by braxus View Post
    That won't happen. Its gone for good.
    That's too bad, because I don't really care about the 100 or 400 speed stuff. Everybody makes something in those categories. But Agfapan 25 was unique. Most of its fans would say that other 25 speed films are nothing like it.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    905
    Quote Originally Posted by kjsphoto View Post
    Remember the Wright Brothers? People thought they were nuts and they succeeded. Instead of looking a the negative all the time, fous on the positive. If there is a will people will find a way to make it happen. I will hold my breath because I know business and people. If someone thinks they can do they will succeed regardless of the obstacles. Maybe it takes them years maybe it doesn't, but it really doesn't matter as long as they sees profit in it they will find or if they have a personal reason to do it, they will find a way to do it, it is human nature.

    Look a the challenge that was given in the last few years to be the first to put a man in space and win $1,000,000 ( I forget the same of the challenge but it was on the discovery channel recently ). A person in the US did it and launched the frist commerical shutle into orbit. People thought it couldn't be done and they accomplished the impossible and did it better than NASA. They were a non government agency that was privately funded and believe me that was much harder and more risk than making photo film or papers.

    So it can be done, it isn't rocket science.
    Well, what isn't said is that Scaled Composite's biggest customer (and single largest source of income) is the US Govt. Their primary business is building scale models for aerodynamic testing, as well as composite prototypes. Bert Rutan is a genius (Google the name, you'd be shocked), and deserves every bit of the accolades. Remember Voayger, the first plane to circumnavigate the earth non stop? Ever hear of the Long EZE? But the reality is that he has some fantastic business managers, and they ensure that the $$$ are there for the pet projects. (which is what the X prize endeaver started out as)


    erie

  4. #44
    copake_ham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NYC or Copake or Tucson
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4,092
    Images
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by kjsphoto View Post
    Remember the Wright Brothers? People thought they were nuts and they succeeded. Instead of looking a the negative all the time, fous on the positive. If there is a will people will find a way to make it happen. I will hold my breath because I know business and people. If someone thinks they can do they will succeed regardless of the obstacles. Maybe it takes them years maybe it doesn't, but it really doesn't matter as long as they sees profit in it they will find or if they have a personal reason to do it, they will find a way to do it, it is human nature.

    Look a the challenge that was given in the last few years to be the first to put a man in space and win $1,000,000 ( I forget the same of the challenge but it was on the discovery channel recently ). A person in the US did it and launched the frist commerical shutle into orbit. People thought it couldn't be done and they accomplished the impossible and did it better than NASA. They were a non government agency that was privately funded and believe me that was much harder and more risk than making photo film or papers.

    So it can be done, it isn't rocket science.
    I don't know where you obtain your information - and you have "mixed" your facts above.

    Firstly,would you please tell who actually placed a shuttle (your word) in orbit? And, again your confusing post, do you mean commercial satellite in orbit or "manned shuttle".

    Actually, I believe the $1,000,000 prize was for a manned sub-orbital flight that had to exceed a certain altitude (100 km?).

    As of now, no private individual or organization has placed a manned spacecraft in orbit. And, in fact, Richard Branson's commercial endeavor to offer rides to space tourists at this time is still only speaking of sub-orbital journeys.

    The fact that the US, Russia and China make manned space travel seem relatively safe is a wonderment that belies the risks of such endeavors - as the losses of Challenger and Columbia have shown.

    More importantly, it would be nice if you would check your facts, clarify your thinking and carefully consider the composition of your posts.

    Because actually, it is rocket science.

  5. #45

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Guys, how many times have we seen jobs or projects take longer and cost more than estimated?

    That is all I'm pointing out here.

    So, we will have to wait and see.

    PE
    Yeah, I've learned the hard way that you best take your initial esitmate for both cost and time, add 10% to them, and then DOUBLE them. I won't count any chickens.

  6. #46
    MattCarey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,303
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by aldevo View Post
    Yeah, I've learned the hard way that you best take your initial esitmate for both cost and time, add 10% to them, and then DOUBLE them. I won't count any chickens.
    Being in a science/research lab, we use a more geekly rule. The rule of "pi". Estimate the time and cost of a project. Multiply by pi (about 3)...

    Matt

  7. #47

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by aldevo View Post
    1) How did they do it better than NASA?
    2) They were a privately-funded outfit that relied on decades of research bankrolled, effectively, by NASA
    3) How is this at all relevant to the continued production of analog products?

    Commercial space travel would likely yield enormous profits. Continued production of analog photographic materials may not yield any at all.
    Umm...
    1) they did it for approximately the money NASA spends on documentation for manned launches - they also did it in a short timeframe and arguably using an alternative approach to what NASA is likely to have used. They also are fairly close to having the result be commercially exploited via Virgin Galactic, something NASA has often struggled with.
    2) strictly speaking, NASA doesn't fund anything, Congress funds NASA to perform aerospace R&D, often being very specific about how the money is to be spent ... but even so, most of the science used in this cases came not from NASA, but ballistic and sounding missile research and need not have come from USA at all.
    3) I agree - not really ;-)

    Starchaser in UK or even Armadillo aerospace are much closer to a true startup model ... and notably neither has really flown yet.

  8. #48

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    These heavy metals are not very toxic AFAIK, and include salts of Rhodium, Iridium and Osmium. They are used in very low quantities, but are very expensive.

    PE
    10 years ago, the US government was still monitoring the trafficking of this stuff - that's probably one reason it's very expensive. Iridium and Osmium are considered strategic materials because there's certain stuff in high-temperature alloys that you can't do without them. They are critical (capital "C") for aerospace applications.

    Demand for these is, supposedly, growing very quickly for these applications. I can't imagine that helps matters for us...

  9. #49

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    10 years ago, the US government was still monitoring the trafficking of this stuff - that's probably one reason it's very expensive. Iridium and Osmium are considered strategic materials because there's certain stuff in high-temperature alloys that you can't do without them. They are critical (capital "C") for aerospace applications.

    Demand for these is, supposedly, growing very quickly for these applications. I can't imagine that helps matters for us...[/QUOTE]

  10. #50
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Coquitlam, BC, Canada
    Posts
    631
    I hope they bring back some paper, too. AND, I hope Forte comes back. Love that Polygrade V FB!

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin