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  1. #81

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    Dear Roger
    What a pleasure to have you reply.
    You may argue any time.

    Apparently all these companies announced simultaneously. Given the association of these governments and business at the time, I wonder if there was sharing of the necessary information then.
    "George Eastman House
    Photography Timeline
    1940 Ansco, Agfa, and Sakura Natural color film introduced
    1941 Eastman Kodak introduces Kodacolor negative film"

    This is a timeline of Ansco’s activities in Birmingham N.Y. and I must confess that I presumed the paper and film went together.
    http://home.att.net/~wlcamp/ansco.htm

    "1942
    Ansco color film is introduced. It is the first American color film which can be processed by the user. Ansco color paper is also introduced. Unfortunately, no film or paper is available for the amateur market. All production is directed to the government."

    In this oral History, Glennan describes Ansco making the first competitive American made color film, and mentions Gaevert in Belgium. Since Kodak came out with their color negative film a year later I presumed this reference referred to negative film.
    http://airandspace.si.edu/research/d...T/GLENNAN3.HTM

    Than I came across this which put that thought in the dustbin.

    http://www.fiafnet.org/pdf/uk/04FIAF66.pdf

    Ansco Color was one of the very first
    35mm chromagenic tri-pack film
    systems to be used for feature films.
    General Aniline Co, of Binghampton, NY,
    USA, had an agreement with Agfa before
    WW2, and used Agfa technology for film
    manufacture from 1940. However,
    instead of using the semi-experimental
    Agfa negative-positive process, they
    based their system on the reversal Afga
    Neue sold from 1936 for stills. The
    process was initially only used by the
    military, but by 1945/6 three films were
    available, a camera film, a low contrast
    duplicating intermediate, and a print
    film. All were reversal. In many respects
    the system was similar to Kodachrome,
    and the later Ektachrome Commercial,
    but was available in 35mm and 16mm.

    So it seems my comments are more to be applied to reversal film.
    One last titbit, apparently Joe Rosenthal’s Iwo Jima photo was done on Ansco film, albeit Black and White.

    Double Cheers
    Bill

  2. #82
    AgX
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    Bill, what is this „1940 Agfa“ remark by GEH about?

    `Agfa Neue´ should means `Agfacolor Neu´ I guess.

  3. #83
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    Konishiroku (Sakura films = cherry blossom films) was the most prominent Japanese film maker before the war and up to partway through the war. Konishiroku Emon was a friend of George Eastman and they worked together early in the 20th century on film. George Eastman was a guest at the Hachioji plant during a visit to Japan.

    When Konica began drifting towards Germany, Eastman severed his ties to Konica, but Konika continued to agressively do R&D using Agfa and Kodak technology both. Their final products were a color negative film and paper similar to Agfa and a color reversal film similar to Kodachrome. I have samples of all of these and process chemistry (now badly expired).

    Agfa color paper was only produced for a neg-pos system, and used emulsions similar to Brovira paper but with other addenda. The yellow was on top and the coating had a CLS (yellow) filter layer under it. The process and emulsions/coupler chemistry was far different than that used after the war.

    Ansco produced only a reversal paper (Printon) at first, and did not produced the neg-pos paper until the early 60s. We were given one of the first demonstrations of it when I was at Cape Canaveral. It was given by Mr. Walt Wall of Ansco. I still have the pictures he gave me printed on Ansco color paper.

    PE

  4. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Bill, what is this „1940 Agfa“ remark by GEH about?

    `Agfa Neue´ should means `Agfacolor Neu´ I guess.
    This is a timeline repeated extensively in various Blog type websites that as far as I can tell originated with George Eastman house staff.
    Based on what I don't know
    Bill

  5. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Konishiroku (Sakura films = cherry blossom films) was the most prominent Japanese film maker before the war and up to partway through the war. Konishiroku Emon was a friend of George Eastman and they worked together early in the 20th century on film. George Eastman was a guest at the Hachioji plant during a visit to Japan.

    When Konica began drifting towards Germany, Eastman severed his ties to Konica, but Konika continued to agressively do R&D using Agfa and Kodak technology both. Their final products were a color negative film and paper similar to Agfa and a color reversal film similar to Kodachrome. I have samples of all of these and process chemistry (now badly expired).

    Agfa color paper was only produced for a neg-pos system, and used emulsions similar to Brovira paper but with other addenda. The yellow was on top and the coating had a CLS (yellow) filter layer under it. The process and emulsions/coupler chemistry was far different than that used after the war.

    Ansco produced only a reversal paper (Printon) at first, and did not produced the neg-pos paper until the early 60s. We were given one of the first demonstrations of it when I was at Cape Canaveral. It was given by Mr. Walt Wall of Ansco. I still have the pictures he gave me printed on Ansco color paper.

    PE
    I think your house or garage would be a vey interesting place indeed
    Bill

  6. #86

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    The History channel, and other cable channels have for several years now had programs on WW2 with color footage of Hitler and other German wartime scenes. I am assuming this is Agfa film. It is surprising to me that the color has held up well, or did they do extensive restoration on the footage?

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