Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,719   Posts: 1,514,892   Online: 1073
      
Page 7 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 87

Thread: Forte closure

  1. #61

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Thanks,

    I understand now. They are preparing the factory to be demolished once a buyer has purchased the land. And it seems very unlikely that the ownership will accept any proposal since they are likely to make more money by simply selling the land. In fact, proposals have been made but they have been rejected.

    Let's hope for that "rich uncle". But I imagine Kentmere has enough trouble trying to sell the products it already has...

    I have emailed Bergger about what they intend to do about Forte's closure and whether Bergger-labeled products will continue to be available.

  2. #62
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,862
    Images
    65
    I think it is worth noting here that the equipment in the plant is worth a lot as scrap. There is probably a lot of high quality stainless steel in the coating machines and in the making kettles.

    It would probably be profitable to dismantle the buildings just to extract the equipment. At least Kodak has found that to be the case.

    As far as different plants go, I've noted before that even using the same plant in Japan, Fuji has publicly stated that they cannot reproduce Velvia 50(? I've forgotten the discontinued film) exactly when they restart making it. Now that is pretty good evidence of the problem that I have spoken of before.

    PE

  3. #63
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,134
    Images
    20
    In the case of Velvia 50, I think the new film is slightly reformulated. As I recall it was discontinued in part due to some component becoming unavailable, possibly for environmental reasons.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #64

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    283
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I think it is worth noting here that the equipment in the plant is worth a lot as scrap. There is probably a lot of high quality stainless steel in the coating machines and in the making kettles.

    It would probably be profitable to dismantle the buildings just to extract the equipment. At least Kodak has found that to be the case.

    As far as different plants go, I've noted before that even using the same plant in Japan, Fuji has publicly stated that they cannot reproduce Velvia 50(? I've forgotten the discontinued film) exactly when they restart making it. Now that is pretty good evidence of the problem that I have spoken of before.

    PE
    :-) As China become a major actor and buy all available steel on the world market it is probably very profitable to sell as scrap that's for sure. The prices on steel wen't up and goes higher and higher day by day. All the steel producing facilities works around the clock worldwide and produce as much as they can and even do is a shortage of steel on the market.

    What comes to produce papers and films the only way to do contain the same quality if some one buy the whole plant with the land downthere and just contenue the production as is. (But the production is stoped and it would take time to get back were they were before but not impossible just hard work and a lot's of losses). Otherwise the paper Forte does die's here and that is sad because it live us with nothing, at least nothing for me. So guys, be prepared to carbon. :-)
    Last edited by uraniumnitrate; 01-30-2007 at 07:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #65
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,862
    Images
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    In the case of Velvia 50, I think the new film is slightly reformulated. As I recall it was discontinued in part due to some component becoming unavailable, possibly for environmental reasons.
    David, thanks for refreshing my flagging memory.

    But it does not change the point of the matter. Fuji cannot exactly remake that film whatever the reason.

    PE

  6. #66

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by uraniumnitrate View Post
    :-) As China become a major actor and buy all available steel on the world market it is probably very profitable to sell as scrap that's for sure. The prices on steel wen't up and goes higher and higher day by day. All the steel producing facilities works around the clock worldwide and produce as much as they can and even do is a shortage of steel on the market.

    What comes to produce papers and films the only way to do contain the same quality if some one buy the whole plant with the land downthere and just contenue the production as is. (But the production is stoped and it would take time to get back were they were before but not impossible just hard work and a lot's of losses). Otherwise the paper Forte does die's here and that is sad because it live us with nothing, at least nothing for me. So guys, be prepared to carbon. :-)

    Actually, China is now a net exporter of steel. And the current predictions are for steel prices to follow the prices of base metals down in 2007 (Copper has dropped A LOT in just a few months). In other words, we may be heading for over-capacity in steel.

    I will be very sad to lose Forte papers, too, as it appears we will almost certainly do

  7. #67

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    283
    Quote Originally Posted by aldevo View Post
    Actually, China is now a net exporter of steel. And the current predictions are for steel prices to follow the prices of base metals down in 2007 (Copper has dropped A LOT in just a few months). In other words, we may be heading for over-capacity in steel.

    I will be very sad to lose Forte papers, too, as it appears we will almost certainly do
    Are you sure about this? See how wrong a man can be. :-) Yeah I know about copper and other row materials but they only begin to fall now. I also have Sweden’s largest steel manufacturer in the neighbouring town SSAB and they almost selling their entire production to China and the plant run for full gas. Not like the photographic businesses. :-)A very close friend of mine has a big iron work and he told me that prices run high because of China as I recall he said that steel suppliers don’t even have fixed price lists any longer as the price changing day by day so they went over to the call in and check basis.

    Well I’m not into this that much but I know for sure that platinum not getting cheaper so as gold which I use to tone. :-)

  8. #68
    Craig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    779
    Images
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post

    Sales are plummeting. Truly they are. You barely see the surface of this.
    This little tidbit came in the mail today from an economic digest I get:

    Camera film peaked in popularity in 1999 when 800-million rolls of reloadable film were sold. Today, the figure has declined to a projected 211-million rolls sold in 2006 as the number of film cameras sold has also fallen.

    Thanks a pretty dramatic drop in only 7 years, and I suspect will continue to fall as the masses buy D**** instead of film point and shoots.

    Craig

  9. #69

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by uraniumnitrate View Post
    Are you sure about this? See how wrong a man can be. :-) Yeah I know about copper and other row materials but they only begin to fall now. I also have Sweden’s largest steel manufacturer in the neighbouring town SSAB and they almost selling their entire production to China and the plant run for full gas. Not like the photographic businesses. :-)A very close friend of mine has a big iron work and he told me that prices run high because of China as I recall he said that steel suppliers don’t even have fixed price lists any longer as the price changing day by day so they went over to the call in and check basis.

    Well I’m not into this that much but I know for sure that platinum not getting cheaper so as gold which I use to tone. :-)
    We are getting off-topic, but...

    Here's a relatively recent (and short) article concerning China's steel exports for October and the year of 2006 through that time:

    http://www.ssyonline.com/News_and_Ev...html?view=2035

    This is not contrary to your observation about the Sweedish steel plant. China does not produce "specialty steels" in large amounts - they still rely on companies in the EU, Japan, and USA for these materials. If this facility produces such steel, then it is likely to be running at very high capacity.

    As for commodity prices, they are listed in USD - which has been steadily losing value. As a result, the prices have increased considerably in the past 5 years. This affects China, as well as the USA, since their currency is closely coupled to the USD.

    Both gold and silver are used as hedges against drops in currency. If uncertainty over the purchasing power of currencies increases - they will appreciate in value. Today, for example, when the US FOMC indicated they were somewhat less concerned about inflation, the dollar fell. And silver and gold all increased in value.

    China's stock market fell 5% today, by the way, over concerns about inflation and the country's need to tighten up monetary policy to prevent banks from making too many bad loans. The dollar fell, and silver, gold, and platinum all increased in price. If the dollar drops substantially (always possible) then commodity prices could still increase even if demand for them slows (let's say China really clamps down on their banking system).

    So, whether China slows or not, I don't expect your gold and platinum will stop getting more expensive regardless of what steel, copper, or anything else does. That goes double for silver.

    There are a lot of people out there in the world worried about the US dollar and other currencies...
    Last edited by aldevo; 01-31-2007 at 03:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #70

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by Craig View Post
    This little tidbit came in the mail today from an economic digest I get:

    Camera film peaked in popularity in 1999 when 800-million rolls of reloadable film were sold. Today, the figure has declined to a projected 211-million rolls sold in 2006 as the number of film cameras sold has also fallen.

    Craig
    Hallo Craig,

    are these numbers the sales numbers of the US-market? Because worldwide over 3 billions of film rolls were sold in the late nineteens.
    So far as I remember the data I've read in a PMA statement, in 2006 an estimated number of about one billion film rolls should be sold. And only the worldwide numbers are relevant for the future of film manufacturing.

    Best regards,
    Jana



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin