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  1. #1
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Kodak film quality considerations - LF and ULF included

    There have been some threads here on film quality and have included Kodak film quality. I thought I might make some comments on this so you would understand it.

    ALL film when coated will have some degree of defects on the 5000 ft 42" master roll or whatever size a given manufacturer produces.

    Kodak scans every square millimeter of coating produced with a surface scan and a scan through the film to look for surface defects and deep defets. This is programmed into a huge software package that maps out the optimum cutting strategy for a given roll, such as 35mm, 120, 220 and etc. when using 5 mil support and LF and ULF formats for 7 mil support. It is designed to include bad spots in the master roll just like formatting a HD detects bad tracks or sectors.

    This program optimizes the yield of film per master roll.

    Now, when someone asks for a custom cut, the software must be changed to included other options in sizes so that waste of the good coating is optimal and low.

    Virtually every square mm of Kodak's bad coatings goes to scrap and all units are optimized to give the best cut for highest yield.

    IDK how others do it, but 100% inspection is carried out at Kodak at the coating stage and at the packaging stage.

    Just an FYI information note.

    PE

  2. #2
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    Sounds a lot like the duties of the highest paid individual in a redwood mill -- who is the fellow who determines how a log will be cut to get the most out of a log.

    Vaughn

  3. #3

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    For 40 years I never had an issue with Kodak, in any format, in the past year I got 35mm TMax 400 with dust in the emulsion, then last week 2 rolls of 35mm TriX with light flares, mostly on the edge but 1 or 2 frames were flared. The rolls were shot in 2 different camera on 2 different days, developed a week apart in 2 different tanks and reels. I usually use a large tanks and dip and dunk in the dark, but as I only had a few rolls to soup I used a SS reels and and Paterson tank.

  4. #4
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Send it back to Kodak Paul.

    They back everything 100% and have a toll free #.

    PE

  5. #5

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    I only lost 2 frames and I need the remainder of the shots, it was just a surprise to see any QC issues with Kodak, (and back to back) regardless of their market loss. I bought cheap film to shoot around, but always bought Kodak for fame and glory.

  6. #6
    Neanderman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Kodak scans every square millimeter of coating produced with a surface scan and a scan through the film to look for surface defects and deep defects.
    What can you tell us about exactly how this is done? Obviously with some wavelength of non-visible light...

    Ed (who is always fascinated with manufacturing processes...)

  7. #7
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    They use IR laser scanners. One bounces off the moving web and the other penetrates through the film. Both are used to pick up different classes of defect. This includes dust, dirt, hair, bugs and etc. Even though the air is filtered and everyone wears special suits, an occasional fleck of dust or a bug creeps in.

    This method is NOT use for HIE and EIR film for obvious reasons and that extra method is what contributes to the high price of these products. And before you ask, no I am not prepared to discuss that method as I was never introduced to it.

    PE

  8. #8
    richard ide's Avatar
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    I must say the quality control is amazing. I have bought about a half million sqare feet of paper and film and the score has been: zero defects for Kodak, Agfa, Ilford and Fuji. One small light leak (master roll) for Dupont and about four or five very minor film defects for no name products.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  9. #9
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Reported here are many defects for some products.

    PE

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    This method is NOT use for HIE and EIR film for obvious reasons
    Because they are no longer in production?


    Just kidding. Thanks for the info. Very interesting.

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