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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sun of sand View Post
    Thanks, PE. Any idea on what type of emulsion it is? I know Azo and Convira emulsion was put onto other papers like Ad-Type and Novosomething which I believe were flexible weight papers

    Is it an Azo or similar RC? Any super-duper qualities? This paper was from late 40's and I'm pondering whether or not to buy any. No idea what the coating would do to an emulsion in terms of its keeping qualities
    I've read about a Mexican RC Azo or something like that ..sounds like it kinda sucked a little.

    I've never been to GEH. I wanted to catch the ansel show but know there are plenty of other wonderful things to check out

    One Day
    I have no idea what kind of emulsion was used in Aero contact papers, but from the slow speed and high intensity printers, I would assume it was an Azo type emulsion, or even Velox. It was not likely to be Velite. IDK what keeping would be like.

    PE

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    George Eastman House has curators with that type of knowledge. But, you might call the EK toll free number.

    Early films had all information on the box. Nothing was on the film but Kodak Safety Film and sometimes a product name.

    PE
    PE Thanks. Toll free from the U.K.? and if so what's the number?

    pentaxuser

  3. #13
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    Yes, there is a toll free number in the UK and should be on all boxes of Kodak film. Their plant is located in Harrow. You could probably call them directly without too much difficulty.

    PE

  4. #14
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    Thanks, PE. Always helpful.

    The Haloid RC paper was mentioned in a shutterbug article ..not liked very much. It seemed to the writer to be a paper only suitable for quick viewing of negatives, not art.


    This is a neat PDF I just read through
    http://http://www.wilhelm-research.c..._HiRes_v1a.pdf

    On page 41 of 50 it mentions Kodaks "first" RC paper
    Kodak Kind 1594. Early 60's. Military use. Kodabromide-like emulsion. Maybe it was a projection paper and not a contact one, though.
    Perhaps Kodak just didn't call those WWII era papers RC? Mentions Kodak Resisto ..which was coated with a cellulose acetate and then converting to an RC base later on

  5. #15
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    One of the first RC papers from Kodak was Verifax.

    Kodak had several papers intended for rapid processing for military purposes. There were enlarging and contact papers. I have most of the old Air Force manuals here, but I have forgotten most of the content and don't have time to research it. None of these papers were intended for quality. They were intended for (among other things) BDA or Bomb Damage Asessment and we had to process this stuff quickly.

    PE

  6. #16
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    I have a box of Azo, 10x10 (square), grade 4, F surface. "Expired" 3/78. An almost full box of 250 sheets. (cat # 142 1684)

    I'll have to give it a try one of these days. Low contrast negatives are usually not one of my problems.

    I assume due to the format, that it was for contacting 9x9 or 10x10 aireal photographs.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #17

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    Vaughn,

    I think you will find that Azo grade 4 that is 30+ years old will print like the most recent grade 3. I did BTZS type testing on my grade 4 and the curve is nearly identical to newer grade 3, just a different speed. If my memory serves me well, (always a source of debate) I'm pretty sure the grade 4 was faster than the grade 3. But, as they say YMMV.
    John Bowen

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddym View Post
    Aw PE, now you've gone and made me nostalgic! I pulled out my old 1974 Kodak Darkroom Dataguide and looked at all the paper samples inside.
    Three Ektalure surfaces: E, X, and K. All gorgeous, although the surface of the G paper is cracking.
    Medalist J, one of my old favorites.
    Portralure, another nice warmtone paper, but I never got to try it.
    The paper list shows Azo available in F, N, and E surfaces, in both single- and double-weights.
    Lots of good papers, long gone. Sigh...
    In case anyone is interested in how these paper surfaces were made, I'm copying in here an earlier post I made about the availability of a booklet that describes the manufacturer and provides a general guide to the characteristics of the surfaces.

    In 2006, I edited/authored a book (spiral bound booklet) titled History of the Paper Mills at Kodak Park which was intended as a memento for Kodak papermakers (the last papermachine was dismantled in 2005). I won't go into the details but that book led to lots of questions about the history of the fiber based B&W papers so I wrote a second book in 2007 titled A Guide to the Surface Characteristics, Kodak Fiber Based Black and White Papers. When doing research for the second book, I came across the APUG site. While I'm strictly a papermaker (retired), I was intrigued by some of the forums and have checked back a few times. That's how I came to this thread and thought there might be interest in the 2 books. One caution, however, the books are about manufacturing paper support and there is nothing about emulsions, emulsion coating, or photo products (subjects I don't know much about). Both books are available at no charge though I do ask that requestors cover the mailing costs. If you would like a copy or want more info you can contact me at KitFunderburk@gmail.com. I'd also be happy to try to answer questions here if that is appropriate for this forum.

    Respectfully,
    Kit Funderburk

  9. #19
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    Kit was there at our lunch meeting.

    PE

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by papermaker View Post
    In case anyone is interested in how these paper surfaces were made, I'm copying in here an earlier post I made about the availability of a booklet that describes the manufacturer and provides a general guide to the characteristics of the surfaces.
    I received copies of both of these books about a week ago. If you have any interest at all in industrial processes or photo product history, I heartily recommend them.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

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