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  1. #1
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Products from years long gone

    Today we had our semiregular Photo Engineers lunch, and I looked at and handled a whole range of old products.

    One was a sealed box of 'fresh' Autochrome film dated 1920. That item was being donated to George Eastman House by one of our 'members'.

    The other was the entire Kodak contact paper guide. It listed and had sample pictures on every version of Azo, Velite and Velox paper in about 3x4 on about 4x5 sheets and dry mounted back to back in a very nice booklet. There were about 16 of each product in this book. We spent a lot of time trying to see 'depth' in the Azo prints.

    There were some beautiful examples in that product book. You should have been there! Don't you wish you were? Warm tone suede Azo in grades from 0 - 5, Matte, DW, SW, Silk, etc..... Very lush looking picture samples.

    PE

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    Did they have Aristo? How about some of the milatary stuff. Would have loved to be there. Oh well. if there is ever a oppurtunity to see the examples in Minnesota let me know.

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    Aw PE, now you've gone and made me nostalgic! I pulled out my old 1974 Kodak Darkroom Dataguide and looked at all the paper samples inside.
    Three Ektalure surfaces: E, X, and K. All gorgeous, although the surface of the G paper is cracking.
    Medalist J, one of my old favorites.
    Portralure, another nice warmtone paper, but I never got to try it.
    The paper list shows Azo available in F, N, and E surfaces, in both single- and double-weights.
    Lots of good papers, long gone. Sigh...
    Eddy McDonald
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    Eschew defenestration!

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    Hey, this fits right in with a question I wanted to ask
    Kodak contact paper from years past ..used by the military -at least- in 4x5 size and called "aero-contact"

    I've researched as much as possible over the internet and all I can find is a couple posts concerning another paper packaged up in the same way only it's Convira. I think I've read that Convira was the equal to Azo. Is this stuff then likely to be Azo? More likely to be one of the other Kodak contact papers?

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The Lumière Brother's Autochromes need to be seen to be believed, the colour qualities of the images are exquisite, I doubt a product like that could be made today. The original Lumiere plant became part of the Ciba-Ilford setup in the arly 1960's, today Lumiere Imaging are the distributors of Ilford materials in France. (Lumiere in Rochester, NY, is a young Pretender)

    George Eastman House is an exceptional museum and resource, I walked there once from my hotel a mile away asking the way I was told jokingly you must be European - Americans don't walk, the Italian I asked was working on a little know aspect of GEH, curating the extensive music collection.

    It would be great to have a proper look at the archives in GEH. We don't have anything like it in Europe.

    Ian

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    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddym View Post
    Three Ektalure surfaces: E, X, and K. All gorgeous, although the surface of the G paper is cracking.
    Oops, that was the G surface that was cracking.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  7. #7
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    Kodak Aero contact was part of the discussion. It and a companion Haloid product were some of the first RC based papers ever made. I have seen in in 9x9 and 9x18". The Lumiere in Rochester is not even related and had to change their name recently due to some Copyright problem (I think I have that correct).

    I have a box of processed Lumiere Autochrome 3D slides sitting next to me, but the ones I saw today were unexposed in the original sealed box. They were on their way to GEH archives I guess.

    Many original cellulose nitrate based motion pictures are stored at GEH and the building is carefully fire and explosion proofed. The vault is supposedly directly under the entrance and the collection there is worth an astronomical sum.

    We also talked about Kodak "Stretchable Film" --- Don't even ask!

    Ian, I have walked nearly the full length of East Avenue when I lived near GEH. I used to walk downtown.

    PE

  8. #8

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    PE. I am glad you started this thread. It has prompted me to repeat a question I asked about Verichrome Pan recently but got no answers. I developed a roll of 120 Verichrome Pan which another APUGer stated that as it has crimson backing paper with yellow writing he knew it to be from around the late 1950s to early 60s.

    The emulsion didn't have any code on it( well, none that I could see) such as Ilford films now do, to help Ilford establish a production date. So is there any way or contact within Kodak who can at least say when Verichrome Pan 120 with crimson backing paper and yellow cursive script writing was last produced. It will at least eastablish the latest date of the film that I developed. I have kept the backing paper so if there is anything useful there that I have missed I can find it if required.

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

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    sun of sand's Avatar
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    Thanks, PE. Any idea on what type of emulsion it is? I know Azo and Convira emulsion was put onto other papers like Ad-Type and Novosomething which I believe were flexible weight papers

    Is it an Azo or similar RC? Any super-duper qualities? This paper was from late 40's and I'm pondering whether or not to buy any. No idea what the coating would do to an emulsion in terms of its keeping qualities
    I've read about a Mexican RC Azo or something like that ..sounds like it kinda sucked a little.

    I've never been to GEH. I wanted to catch the ansel show but know there are plenty of other wonderful things to check out

    One Day

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    PE. I am glad you started this thread. It has prompted me to repeat a question I asked about Verichrome Pan recently but got no answers. I developed a roll of 120 Verichrome Pan which another APUGer stated that as it has crimson backing paper with yellow writing he knew it to be from around the late 1950s to early 60s.

    The emulsion didn't have any code on it( well, none that I could see) such as Ilford films now do, to help Ilford establish a production date. So is there any way or contact within Kodak who can at least say when Verichrome Pan 120 with crimson backing paper and yellow cursive script writing was last produced. It will at least eastablish the latest date of the film that I developed. I have kept the backing paper so if there is anything useful there that I have missed I can find it if required.

    Thanks

    pentaxuser
    George Eastman House has curators with that type of knowledge. But, you might call the EK toll free number.

    Early films had all information on the box. Nothing was on the film but Kodak Safety Film and sometimes a product name.

    PE

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