Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,912   Posts: 1,521,620   Online: 846
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    Uncle Goose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Gent (Belgium)
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    407
    Images
    1
    This is not new news, Meopta was planning to step out of the photo business for years now and I can't blame them. Meopta now specializes in optics and riflescopes and for that there is still a market, for enlargers there is no market left. I'm glad the Meopta management is clever enough to realize that if they continue making enlargers it would cost them money and a possible the end of the company. I've always been a fan of Meopta, they have made great stuff like Flexaret's and enlargers and I still use them. They may look back to a wonderful history of making photographic gear and I will still use my Flexaret with pride wherever I go to.
    Last edited by Uncle Goose; 02-04-2008 at 05:46 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo
    Sure, I could give you a boring explanation who I really am but I rather let the Origami do the talking.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    328
    Spare parts and replacement fiddly-bits will also become very difficult to find, if you can find them anywhere. Dont ever break anything, or you will regret it very much.

    paulie

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,309
    So, if I want to keep the enlarger makers in business, I need to buy how many new enlargers during my photographic lifetime? Much as I try, I still haven't worn out my first Beseler!

    As stated in above posts, the manufacturers are dealing with a shrinking market that's flooded with good used gear. There is room for only so many manufacturers in such a market. Meopta was smart to get out, and lucky to have other facets of its business to continue.

    Peter Gomena

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    Its the colleges and universities (I would think) who would be the major purchasers of NEW enlargers and darkroom equipment. Those that continue to teach analog photography...which are quite a few.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Sarajevo
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,801
    Quote Originally Posted by pauliej View Post
    Spare parts and replacement fiddly-bits will also become very difficult to find, if you can find them anywhere. Dont ever break anything, or you will regret it very much.

    paulie
    That is another thing why Meopta is so good. Meopta enlargers are so low tech, that is very easy to make spare parts if you need them. Either you can make them or any local kraftsman who have tools for metal work can make it for you.
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
    No things in life should be left unfinis

  6. #16
    tim_walls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Croydon & Leeds
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,037
    Images
    48
    'tis sad news. My enlarger is a Meopta Magnifax - bought new no less (sometimes, the convenience of buying from a proper store beats faffing around on bleeding fleabay, so sue me.) And I love it - as Haris says, it's such a wonderfully simple but effective piece of machinery. I shall keep the beasty going til I pop my clogs hopefully :-).

    (Although eventually I'm going to have to get an enlarger for 4x5"... But I figure I'll just have two enlargers . Of course, first I need to buy a house I can build a darkroom big enough in... (That's serious - I'm currently in the housing market, and space for a darkroom is one of my requirements .) Anyway, to stop wandering off topic - great shame, but good luck to them.
    Another day goes under; a little bourbon will take the strain...

  7. #17

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    Quote Originally Posted by haris View Post
    That is another thing why Meopta is so good. Meopta enlargers are so low tech, that is very easy to make spare parts if you need them. Either you can make them or any local kraftsman who have tools for metal work can make it for you.
    There are also high-tech devices that may make this much easier in the not-too-distant future. Specifically, there are 3-D "printers" that can create objects out of plastics when fed computer files that describe those objects. These devices are currently expensive and are therefore uncommon, but the price is coming down. I expect that, even if the price doesn't drop to the point where everybody's got one of these on their desks, they'll be accessible via walk-in or mail-order stores. At that point, you'd need an original part for scanning or a computer file (maybe provided by somebody who's got an intact original) and you'd then be able to get a replacement part quite easily and inexpensively. This specific technology might not be so great if you need a metal replacement part, but if plastic will do, it'll be very useful for helping to maintain enlargers -- and cameras, for that matter.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    There are also high-tech devices that may make this much easier in the not-too-distant future. Specifically, there are 3-D "printers" that can create objects out of plastics when fed computer files that describe those objects. These devices are currently expensive and are therefore uncommon, but the price is coming down. I expect that, even if the price doesn't drop to the point where everybody's got one of these on their desks, they'll be accessible via walk-in or mail-order stores. At that point, you'd need an original part for scanning or a computer file (maybe provided by somebody who's got an intact original) and you'd then be able to get a replacement part quite easily and inexpensively. This specific technology might not be so great if you need a metal replacement part, but if plastic will do, it'll be very useful for helping to maintain enlargers -- and cameras, for that matter.
    But in most cases plastic WON'T do it.

    Having a custom part manufactured (especially one that must be designed to move or actuate movement) is not an inexpensive proposition.

    Try getting a quote out of, say, SK Grimes for less than $300 unless it's something in their catalog.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by pgomena View Post
    So, if I want to keep the enlarger makers in business, I need to buy how many new enlargers during my photographic lifetime? Much as I try, I still haven't worn out my first Beseler!

    As stated in above posts, the manufacturers are dealing with a shrinking market that's flooded with good used gear. There is room for only so many manufacturers in such a market. Meopta was smart to get out, and lucky to have other facets of its business to continue.

    Peter Gomena
    I can either buy a new enlarger and shoot very little film and paper or do what I did which was to buy a used enlarger and have money left over for plenty of film and paper.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,336
    Meopta stopped already their production over 1 1/2 years ago, so not really hot news.
    Only very speciallized small manufactureres can survive in this shrinking market: Kienzle, Dunco and maybe a couple others.
    The mentioned above manufacturers are both very high qualified German products.
    Both systems can be also modular equipped with the famous Split Grade system from Heiland electronics, Wetzlar, Germany.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin