Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,959   Posts: 1,558,206   Online: 1159
      
Page 10 of 17 FirstFirst ... 45678910111213141516 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 170
  1. #91

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    378
    Well, it really doesn't have to be one or the other. You of all people should know that, Bob. . . you've got the actual B&H superstore to turn to!

  2. #92

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,067
    There's a tale best left unsaid there! But yes, you're right. Spoiled for choice in New York.
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  3. #93
    Craig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    779
    Images
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell View Post
    And the last time anybody here bought something from a REAL camera shop ?

    Well ?
    This morning, I bought a Nikkor 20mm. Their prices are good, the service excellent, so I support them. Even if it was $5 cheaper at Best Buy or wherever, I hate shopping at those sorts of places.

  4. #94
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    I bought a new body, lighting and assorted odds from a real camera store here in Van and back in Detroit I'd buy my chems from CameraMart (a 20 mile drive) and assorted film, and stuff from CameraMart and Adray's (also a good drive away). I didn't have my prints made or my film developed by anyone but me, which is where the margins where once fat.

    I don't know that Ritz went out of their way to hire jerks or even that they had jerks working for them. I do think that Ritz tried to service a market space that was shrinking in size and profitability. I'm saddened to see them do poorly as I think it says more about the market then it does about Ritz. No one wins if they close their doors.

    Are we better off today with one Home Depot or many small hardware, tool shops and lumber yards; a mix of butchers, grocers, hardware and pharmacies populating our city centers or one giant super store located off the interstate?

    *

  5. #95

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,067
    I'd vote unequivocally for the mix. What many don't realize is the the big box stores have business models that rely on tax abatements. In the U.S. a big box will petition local government promising to bring x number of jobs to the area in return for tax breaks. What they don't mention is that they drive main street out of business, (lowering the tax receipts still further) and force higher tax rates on all. I just wonder if the higher prices at the local store are really higher after you take all this into account.
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  6. #96

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    509
    Quote Originally Posted by jd callow View Post
    I don't know that Ritz went out of their way to hire jerks or even that they had jerks working for them. I do think that Ritz tried to service a market space that was shrinking in size and profitability. I'm saddened to see them do poorly as I think it says more about the market then it does about Ritz. No one wins if they close their doors.
    From having worked there, I don't think Ritz TRIES to hire jerks, but the way they treat you makes you become a jerk. You're pressured into selling items by their tracking of certain products, generally these products have an SI or sales incentive attached.......now for the good part. Some items don't automatically ring up as on sale, you have to press a button to "blitz" them down to that price. Guess what happens when you give a discount, even if it's hitting the blitz button that automatically lowers it to the correct price......YOU LOSE YOUR SALES INCENTIVE! Also, the company will work you like a dog, then cut your full time status because you don't have completely open availability. For example, right now I'm in college and had been working at a Ritz here 10-20 hours a week, though over breaks I'd pull 40+ hours. This december it was determined I could only work a maximum of 30 hours a week because I was not available from 9-11 one morning each week. The store is open 12 hours a day, so there was still plenty of time to get my 40 hours in, just company policy dictated that I couldn't. Then you have your lab maintenance techs, TSM's. We were a decidedly low volume store, at least compared to others.......our frontier went down, he told us he could be there in 2 weeks to repair it, though he might have to order parts which would take another week. As it turns out it was a simple repair, and a good thing myself and one other employee are decent at figuring things out, no parts needed. The district management is a part of the problem too, I remember struggling to convince our TSM to come sooner, and decided to enlist the help of our district manager. His response was to get incredibly angry we hadn't called the TSM sooner and jump to the conclusion that we somehow offended the TSM to make him wait so long to come in.

  7. #97

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,067
    Yes, unfortunately a common tale - not just Ritz, of course. As always it rolls downhill and when you're on the receiving end of all of it it's difficult to maintain a friendly face! It still goes back to the ascendancy of the shareholder. Used to be that the shareholder returns were the residual of a good, ongoing business which treasured things like customer service, which itself arises out of decently treated staff. I still maintain that the investor returns were ridiculously high in a low inflation environment. They were unsustainable and, as they proved so shareholders put increasing pressure on management to sustain the unsustainable. Guess who got the short end of that stick..................... And we customers wonder why we got less than friendly service !
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  8. #98

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    328
    I think the bottom line is that no matter what you sell (ciggarettes, soap or suppositories) if you can sell it and make a PROFIT, you may be able to stay in business. If you cant SELL, you need to be shopping around for a cheap Chapter 11 (etc) lawyer pretty darn soon. I think General Motors is getting the idea about this, as are many others...

    paulie

  9. #99

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,067
    No argument there pauliej. My point is that expected profit levels, (and I'm talking in general here) exceeded sustainability. That prompts management to squeeze people like bob100684 and with unintended results. You can't sustain an overall 10% profit growth in a 2% inflationary environment. I mean we had the ridiculous situation of Calpers becoming activist shareholders demanding cuts in certain corporations' staff benefits - so that California Public retirees could maintain their same level of benefits. No-one seemed to see the dichotomy in that. But point taken - if there's no profit - there's no business.

    Bob H
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  10. #100

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    509
    Quote Originally Posted by BobNewYork View Post
    No argument there pauliej. My point is that expected profit levels, (and I'm talking in general here) exceeded sustainability. That prompts management to squeeze people like bob100684 and with unintended results. You can't sustain an overall 10% profit growth in a 2% inflationary environment. I mean we had the ridiculous situation of Calpers becoming activist shareholders demanding cuts in certain corporations' staff benefits - so that California Public retirees could maintain their same level of benefits. No-one seemed to see the dichotomy in that. But point taken - if there's no profit - there's no business.

    Bob H
    The problem with Ritz's model was the slightly more expensive goods, but more service. Many of the products I sold were +/- $10 as compared to best buy. However the customer got some free product(though not the $400 worth that the ad claims, it was a $30 photo book, a $5 cd, and 20 prints at 20 cents each) as well as photo classes. When consumers shifted more and more towards big box stores, prices dropped, but only in ways screwing the clerk ie. the "blitz" function. Realistically, they should have maybe dropped prices as well as SOME of the free stuff. Also, if you walk into best buy now, you can get a 1gig SD card for about $10, so what does ritz do, they get 1 gig MICRO sd cards with an adapter for $10.....works the same way, but there's that additional step that consumers mostly don't understand.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin