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  1. #21

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    When I first got into photography in 1997, only the news agencies and papers with the biggest budgets were using digital. There were a huge number of films available. Kodak, Fujifilm, Agfa, Konica, and Scotch all made color film for the US market.

    Fuji's product lineup honestly was not that much different than theirs today. They had a few more specialist products, such as duplicating film and interneg film, as well as a 1600 speed Provia, but other than these, it was very similar to today.

    Kodak, on the other hand, sells a fraction of the types of color film they did 13 years ago.

    This was Kodak's color film lineup around the middle of 1997:

    Ektachrome slide film:

    Ektachrome Elite II 50
    Ektachrome Elite II 100
    Ektachrome 160T
    Ektachrome Elite II 200
    Ektachrome Elite II 400

    Pro Ektachrome slide film:

    Ektachrome 64
    Ektachrome 64T
    Ektachrome 100
    Ektachrome 100 Plus
    Ektachrome Lumiere 100
    Ektachrome E100s
    Ektachrome E100sw
    Ektachrome 160T
    Ektachrome 200
    EKtachrome 320T
    Ektachrome 400x
    Ektachrome P1600
    Ektachrome Infrared

    Kodachrome slide film:

    Kodachrome 25
    Kodachrome 64
    Kodachrome 200

    Pro Kodachrome slide film:

    Kodachrome 25 Professional
    Kodachrome 64 Professional
    Kodachrome 200 Professional

    Color negative film:

    Ektar 25
    Royal Gold 25
    Pro 100
    Ektapress 100
    Pro 100T
    Royal Gold 100
    Gold 100
    Vericolor 160
    Ektacolor 160
    Royal Gold 200
    Gold 200
    Pro 400 PMC
    Pro 400 PPF
    Royal Gold 400
    Gold 400
    Ektapress 640
    Max 800
    Royal Gold 1000
    Pro 1000 PMZ
    Ektapress 1600


    There were other more obscure color films not mentioned also, such as VR 200, VR400, etc, etc...

    And some films, such as Gold 1600, Lumiere 50, Ektachrome 64x, Kodachrome 40, etc. had existed during the earlier 1990s, but had been discontinued prior to 1997. I was very young at the time and didn't get to use many of the films listed in this post.

    B&W was very similar to today, except that Technical Pan, Verichrome Pan, HIE, and and an orthochromatic film existed. (And TMY was on its first version). Even in 1997, your choices were basically Plus-X, Tri-X, 3 speeds of T-Max, or a chromogenic ISO 400 film.
    Last edited by B&Wpositive; 01-02-2010 at 07:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    You may want to include Fuji, Agfa and Ilford products. You may also want to include replacements.

    PE

  3. #23

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    When were Tri-X filmpacks discontinued? I have a Kodak Black and White Darkroom Dataguide from about 1990 and these are still listed as available. I was just wondering if anyone remembered.

  4. #24

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    Wow Thanks B&WPositive for the list of Kodak films from 97. I wish I had the chance to use Ektachrome 320T, Ektachrome 400x, Ektachrome P1600, Ektachrome Infrared, and Ektachrome Elite II 50. What exactly was Ektachrome Lumiere 100?

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    ...recently improved films (TMY-2)... and films that have been at least "tweaked" in recent years (Tri-X 400).
    Tweaked?

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    This was Kodak's color film lineup around the middle of 1997:

    <snip>
    Blimey. That line-up looked ripe for rationalization. Did we really honestly honestly need that many films? There must have been huge "use overlap".

    Kodak's modern line-up is fairly clean and uniform. An experienced photographer can decide exactly which film he needs for a given situation. I couldn't honestly say that with that 1997 list. How many of those were just rubbish... sorry... obsolete zombie films clogging up the line-up?
    Last edited by Admbws; 01-03-2010 at 06:15 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I wrote out a list of today's films. It seemed pointless, so I cut it.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Admbws View Post
    Blimey. That line-up looked ripe for rationalization. Did we really honestly honestly need that many films? There must have been huge "use overlap".

    Kodak's modern line-up is fairly clean and uniform. An experienced photographer can decide exactly which film he needs for a given situation. I couldn't honestly say that with that 1997 list. How many of those were just rubbish... sorry... obsolete zombie films clogging up the line-up?
    Possibly; and there have been film technology improvements in the last 12/13 years which may compensate for more limited product choice. However, there are films on that list such as neutral E6 films and 25 ISO colour negative stock that do not have direct equivalents.

    Tom

  8. #28
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Not a clue Tom and it seems that no one at Kodak does either. It is one of those imponderable events that confounds everyone. B&W film sales at EK remain strong from what I hear. B&W paper sales fell to abysmal levels. Maybe it was the huge product range? They did have trouble supporting all of those paper types.
    PE
    From the UK point of view until the early 70's Kodak were very strong in B&W paper, I think it was Ilford launching the technologically superior Multigrade which pushed them onto the back foot, & they never recovered from this.

    One or two industry experts of my acquaintance stated many years ago that Kodak would NEVER cease marketing B&W papers, whatever the volume dwindled to, as that would be releasing a larger section of market they had tied up, into the hands of the competition. Until a certain date they must have taken B&W paper very seriously indeed & wanted to retain it, as at one point about 10 years ago there was a deal on the table for Kodak to buy Ilford. Kodak retreated from the deal just before signature, which must pinpoint a U turn in their planning.

  9. #29

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    Martin,

    From looking at the back of various ILFORD paper boxes they seem to have changed hands rather often; although my earliest usage is only covered by 'ILFORD Imaging (UK) Ltd' circa 2003. Interesting to note that Harman still ships paper with the www.ilford.com URL on the label.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Reed View Post
    From the UK point of view until the early 70's Kodak were very strong in B&W paper, I think it was Ilford launching the technologically superior Multigrade which pushed them onto the back foot, & they never recovered from this.

    One or two industry experts of my acquaintance stated many years ago that Kodak would NEVER cease marketing B&W papers, whatever the volume dwindled to, as that would be releasing a larger section of market they had tied up, into the hands of the competition. Until a certain date they must have taken B&W paper very seriously indeed & wanted to retain it, as at one point about 10 years ago there was a deal on the table for Kodak to buy Ilford. Kodak retreated from the deal just before signature, which must pinpoint a U turn in their planning.
    I can remember trying `Kodak Elite Fine-Art` B&W paper. Although it was not to everyone`s liking, I thought it was an excellent paper, but it suddenly disappeared before I had a chance to stock-up.

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