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  1. #21
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Henderson View Post
    Call me Pollyanna, but I think that while it is too bad that once-venerable Kodak materials are gone or going, their withdrawal from the market leaves more customers for Ilford and other manufacturers, strengthening their ability to serve analog photographers.
    Competition is good... if Kodak were to discontinue ALL film products, I think, would be bad for Ilford. I can't help but feel that many people (not necessarily photographers) would simply be under the impression that film is no longer manufactured, period. And, I think, if there's only one company left standing, then any bump in the road they might hit, would be bad news for the few photographers who stuck it out.

    If you are a pro, and want to use film, it would be risky to make big investments in gear if only one company were making film. If Kodak needs to discontinue a poor selling film (despite my efforts, as I've routinely used 220 format TXP over the past few years.) to save the rest of it, then that's something I'll adjust to. I like the regular Tri-x, and I'm going to try TMY and Fp4 next. I want to know, and understand more than one film, from more than one manufacturer.

  2. #22
    viridari's Avatar
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    Well don't forget, Suzanne, that there are many more film manufacturers out there than just Kodak/Ilford/Fuji. Fomapan, for example, has been very kind to me.

  3. #23
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    Yes, of course... I'm just saying we really shouldn't wish for any one's demise, as my scenario is really "a worst case". At any rate, Kodak is such a well known brand, to have them give up film all together would be *gulp* ... don't even want to contemplate it....
    Last edited by SuzanneR; 02-09-2010 at 09:35 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarity

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Watson View Post
    In fact, they do. Far better than *you* know how to do their jobs. Grow up Dr5chrome. Quit throwing tantrums in public. It's unseemly. If you can't or won't grow up at least STFU. Acting out like this reflects badly on all us film users.
    Ooo, nice showing on that maturity front.
    I may have a new standard example for unintentional irony.

  5. #25
    viridari's Avatar
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    Yes, it would be awful for Kodak to go away. But they seem to be swirling around the bowl, so to speak.

    The boutique manufacturers may be the ones who keep the fire going for us if/when the unthinkable happens. They are in a better position to scale up than Kodak is to scale down.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by goldie View Post
    I think dr5 makes a good point that the name of the product was confusing. Kodak should have named it something other than Tri-X Pro so it was clear that it was a different emulsion.
    In the mid-1990's I went into the Wolf Camera in Charlotte (the large "pro" store which is now out of business) and asked for Tri-X TXP 320 in 120 size. The sales clerk informed me that there was no such film, even though there was a brick of it sitting in the fridge right behind him. I once had the same exact experience in another store buying Tech Pan. I don't think this was entirely the fault of Kodak, the salespeople should know their stock; however, there is no doubt that most of Kodak's black-and-white products have been marketed badly.

  7. #27
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=rthomas;939194] I don't think this was entirely the fault of Kodak, the salespeople should know their stock; QUOTE]

    This is part of the issue in any camera store. Most camera companies (including the one I work at) make very little money in the actual products they sell but more in the services they sell. Thus, photofinishing is often the most profitable aspect of a store. A Nikon D3X might have a $1k mark-up (often much less due to competition) but you might only sell several a year. Since most customers are more likely to take Consumers Reports' suggestions for a new camera than a salesperson's suggestion, why spend the money training anyone? As well, there is a glut of people wanting to work for low-wages at camera stores due to any discounts and because many young-people see it as a method of getting into the photography business (incorrect assumption IMO but I see it a lot). Why pay a minimum-wage person who is likely gone in several months to learn anything that the consumer is not going to trust over a random internet posting?

    I don't like it but that's the way it runs.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  8. #28

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    I also just recently found TXP in 120 and fell in love with it, buying a box of 4x5 and a few pro-packs of 120. Now they go and cancel it. I've been developing in XTOL, which I like very much for other reasons.

    What other emulsion in a similar speed, available in 120 and 4x5, and works with similar "look" in XTOL, should I be looking at?

  9. #29
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    Back in 2003, IIRC, the Great Yellow Father announced that they would remove themselves from the FILM business in seven years. Looks like they're right about on schedule to me.
    Exactly. And here I was starting to think that I was the only one who actually listened to what Kodak was saying.

    Everyone seems to think that the reason the film product line at Kodak continues to shrink is because Kodak doesn't know what they are doing, either in management or marketing, or both.

    To the contrary, after listening to what they have told us, I believe that Kodak knows exactly what they are doing.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuzanneR View Post
    I can't help but feel that many people (not necessarily photographers) would simply be under the impression that film is no longer manufactured, period.
    This has already happened in my area. I get asked far too often when carrying around my Rollei, "can you still find film for that camera?".

    I was at the Mid-America photography symposium last May. I was the only one shooting film. One of the classes was taught by a former National Geographic photographer. He didn't know that Kodachrome was still available at that time. The lack of knowledge and advertising is truly sad.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

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