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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    losheng:

    I use Paterson (and other) tanks on a Uniroller base. The 3 x 35mm/2 x120 roll tank is long enough that it can ride on the Uniroller's wheels while the wider part of the tank extends past the roller. When I use the smaller tanks (2 x 35mm/1 x 120), I use them inside a plastic container from a kitchen store that is slightly longer and slightly wider then the tanks. The kitchen store container has the non-tapered walls, so it works well.

    In both cases, I find it helpful to use heavy duty large rubber bands, to keep the tanks and container from wandering off their perch.

    As far as needed quantities of chemicals are concerned, I use 1/2 the normal capacity for the tanks. For the 3 x 35mm/2 x120 roll Paterson tank, that means 500 ml.

    By the way, when I do a single roll of 120, I prefer the AP/Adorama/?? equivalent tanks and reels that can also use Paterson reels. They fit well in the kitchen container, and use a little bit less chemistry.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12

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    Dear losheng,

    It will take a day or so to find the information. It's pretty much rough hand work but I will get it to you.

    Neal Wydra

  3. #13
    RobertV's Avatar
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    A CPP will only help if your tap water which is comming in is under 20C. In this way you can cool down your water bath.

    In all other situations (CPE/CPA) you will have to cool down the water bath with ice cubes.

    The only alternative is to make a higher temperature development but over 24 C for B&W you're running into troubles with soft emulsion, the use of hardener, too short developing times, developers not suitable for higher temperatures.

  4. #14
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Or a nice steel tank with good reels.

    Rotary processing is a wonderful idea, but not always a happy reality.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  5. #15
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by losheng View Post
    3. Tim, alanrockwood: Phototherm! I never knew about Phototherm - the Sidekick looks awesome, and it looks like its in the league of the Jobo ATL-1500. That's really a washing-machine solution: just load the film and press the button! Indeed something to keep in mind. I can't afford brand new ones, but I'll look out for used sets.
    I'll second the Phototherm crowd. You would have a fight on your hands to get mine from me.

    New they really are quite pricey, but if you can find a used one then do not hesitate to snap it up if the price is right.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  6. #16

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    Mattking: I'll keep that ingenious modifications in mind!
    Neal: much appreciated!
    RobertV: without a true heat exchanger, the cold water solenoid is useless in the tropics then - water here are way above 20 degree C. I also knew about the TPV processor. It looks like it does only automatic inversion - so I presume it would use the same amount of chemicals as hand development method. But the tiny foot print is very nice indeed.
    Michaelbsc: Thanks - looks like a used Uniroller is the cheapest way to get things going (just grabbed one off ebay for USD20 to try it out), but the Phototherm is the complete solution. I looked around ebay and couldn't find any recent listing at all. Where did you guys find your Phototherm?
    df cardwell: when you said "not always a happy reality", are you referring to the possible problems such as streaks and such?

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by losheng View Post
    ... but the Phototherm is the complete solution. I looked around ebay and couldn't find any recent listing at all. Where did you guys find your Phototherm?...
    I managed to snag two of them on ebay over the years. I would say they come up on ebay several times per year, maybe something like four to eight times per year. Set up an ebay search that automatically emails you every time it finds a Phototherm. In fact, set up several searches using different spelling variations (phototherm, photo-therm, etc.)

  8. #18
    RobertV's Avatar
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    without a true heat exchanger, the cold water solenoid is useless in the tropics then
    What you want is cooling down the water bath temperature. When your tap water is above the developing temperature you would need a cryostat. A cryostat is available for lab equipment and could be installed on a Jobo. In fact for such a unit you do not need any solenoid so a CPA would be ok.
    Water is floating through a peltier element where it's cooled down. A sensor in the recycled water is controlling the right temperaure.

    About the TPV processor: Very compact but the same possibilities as hand inversion. When using a Jobo 1510 (250ml) or 1520 (485ml) tank the overall volume is still rather low.
    The temperature correction is done automatically on the unit.

  9. #19
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    when you said "not always a happy reality", are you referring to the possible problems such as streaks and such?

    DEPENDING on what you are trying to do,
    and the results you want to achieve,
    ROTARY PROCESSING might not be a satisfactory technique for you.

    What is it you want to do ???
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  10. #20
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    Rotary processing is great for those processes which were designed for strictly programmed agitation and which use materials which are not adversely affected by exposure to air. For example, c-41, e6, etc. work very well with rotary processing.

    I've used it a great deal with a variety of developers, including pyro formulas. Pyro oxidizes rapidly. That isn't to say it can't be used in a rotary processor, but doing so can result in heavy overall stain which can seriously affect printing. I use an old pyro-acetone formula which gives very little stain if used in a tank or even in a tray, but in the rotary processor it comes out looking like a good cup of coffee. This not only adds greatly to the printing time, but also, if using VC papers, it adds a serious amount of yellow filtration which skews the contrast heavily to the softer side. Correcting for that is no longer rational and the more high contrast filtration added, the exposure time needed increases something like exponentially.

    When it is right for the process, though, it can be really great, because consistency issues are minimized and you don't have to stand there in front of the sink for long periods of time.

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