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  1. #51
    fotch's Avatar
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    What a mess!
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  2. #52
    cmo
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    There is one company not mentioned: Filmotec in Germany, better known for it's old brand name ORWO. These guys produce b/w motion picture films like the ORWO UN 54, a viable 100 ASA film in fact, without rem-jet and at least as good as Kodak's b/w motion picture films. Some people buy big rolls from dealers like Wephota or Wittner Kinotechnik and roll their own 135/36, probably one of the cheapest ways to feed a rangefinder or SLR.

    http://www.filmotec.com/English_Site.../products.html
    The future belongs to the few of us still willing to get our hands smell like fixing bath.

  3. #53
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    For the motion picture knowledgeable: why doesn't black and white neg stock (double-x, plus-x) have the rem-jet backing?

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by erikg View Post
    For the motion picture knowledgeable: why doesn't black and white neg stock (double-x, plus-x) have the rem-jet backing?
    Probably because the process for B&W is as old as the hills, when the ECN process came out it was brand new and they could add what is a potentially tricky step. ECN2 followed along.
    Charles MacDonald
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  5. #55
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    Part of this is due to the antistatic properties of rem-jet. At high speeds during printing or filming, static electricity can discharge and fog film. Rem-jet is conductive and dissipates any charge. B&W films are now coated on a conductive stock that contains a small amount of conductive material.

    In addition, rem-jet is very neutral, a must for color film.

    Those are my takes on this.

    PE

  6. #56
    AgX
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    The electrostatic "load" should be the same for colour and b&w films.
    And when REM-Jet was introduced there was no other good antistatic agent to be employed, to my knowledge.

    So this whole REM-Jet thing is still enigmatic to me. (Remember some time ago there was a thread discussing the origin of that name? We could only guess then.)

  7. #57
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    In the early days of coating, B&W film made one pass through the coating machine, but color films made up to 7 passes. The statistical chance of increasing the static discharge problems was probably large. IDK. Color was also coated at higher speed due to the number of passes. And, as I said, rem-jet is very neutral in color, thus being ideal for color.

    It may be that some early B&W films had a rem-jet back. Again IDK. I have no idea of the history of this backing. I would have to talk to a process historian at GEH.

    PE

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