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  1. #121
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    You cannot reuse or "rescue" outdated or surplus film or paper.

    PE
    Hey I saw on the internet (so it's gotta be true!) that they pay little kids in the third world to scrape off the emulsion and make it into Jell-o., which they then sell to them.

    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  2. #122
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    From June 25th WSG:

    "In March, Kodak's movie-film business, which had remained relatively steady
    even as camera film sales plunged, suffered a new blow when three big movie
    theater chains secured financing to convert 14,000 movie screens to digital
    projection by 2013. The funding is expected to accelerate the digital distribution
    of movies, giving Kodak less time to adapt to the long-anticipated decline in its
    film cash cow."

    A. Perez, in an interview.

  3. #123
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    At what anniversary will Kodak give out a free digital camera to every 12-year-old throughout the country? Inquiring minds want to know.


    Giveaway camera found readily for sale
    By Terry Maurer, What's it worth
    Merchandise giveaways have become pretty common in modern business. There are two-for-one specials at department stores and after-purchase rebates on everything from cell phones to wine.

    Sometimes you can even get things free.

    We may think of these marketing tactics as modern, but they're not.

    In today's What's it Worth, a reader asks about her camera, part of one of the first huge promotions of this kind in 1930.

    Q. My father gave me this camera a few months ago. He said on Kodak's 50th anniversary, the company gave a camera to 12-year-olds throughout the country and this is the camera they gave him. It appears to be in good shape. The shutter works well, but the viewing glass is cloudy. It has a gold seal on the side depicting Kodak's 50th anniversary. My father did not say much more about it. I don't know if it is worth much, but it is priceless to me.

    -- Jane in Richland

    A. Kodak is, of course, one of the most famous names in American business. Founded in the late 1800s by a buggy whip salesman and a bank clerk, the company's innovative products soon made it an international photography phenomenon. Producing cameras, film, accessories, lenses and just about anything you'd want or need to make pictures, Kodak had production plants all over the world. Each location made its own cameras for its own market, so collectors find all kinds of variations.

    In 1930, Kodak celebrated 50 years in business in a big way. They decided to give a free camera to every 12-year-old in the United States and Canada. Kodak was going to give away 550,000 special cameras -- complete kits with box camera, film, instruction manual and a note from company leader George Eastman.

    The widely advertised promotion that was featured in the company's magazine "Kodakery" and announced by first lady Grace Coolidge had two purposes. One was to celebrate the golden anniversary. The other was to get huge numbers of youngsters interested in photography. Kodak always believed they'd make much more money selling roll after roll of film than they would selling cameras.

    All a family had to do to get their camera was stop in at a Kodak retailer and ask for one, demonstrating the child was or would be 12 years of age in 1930. The promotion started May 1 and it seems all the more than half-million cameras were gone within about a week.

    The camera is a special edition of the "Rainbow Hawkeye" model, with that gold seal on the side. This was a stripped-down version, with one lens, using 120 film. In good condition, they still take pictures today and the film is readily available.

    As a collectible, these are of interest to camera fans and there are lots of them for sale in shops and on the Internet. What's rare is that Jane doesn't seem to have the original box. The camera and the other giveaway parts were packaged in an Art Deco-design cardboard box that's seldom found today.

    The camera itself ranges in price from $25 upwards and we have seen one offered by a Seattle camera shop for more than $100. Add about 50 percent to any price if the box is still there.

    Q. I hope you can give me some information on a serving tray that has a glass top and print underneath. I haven't been able to find out about the print, which shows a family group in fancy dress in an outdoor setting. We think my mother bought the tray at a thrift shop in Winnemucca, Nev., years ago. Thanks.

    -- Candyce in Dayton

    A. We were able to examine this white tray in person and found the print to be just that, something produced on a printing press. It may have been cut to size to fit the oval opening in the matt. The gilded decoration is uneven and was applied by hand -- perhaps as a craft project.

    The print is quite attractive but we don't know which original work of art is the basis for the scene. From the clothing, the family dates from the 1700s or early 1800s. But the tray itself was probably made in the 1920s or 1930s.

    There'll be some interest in this, especially among those who like to decorate in the "shabby chic" style. The value isn't high -- in the $25 to $35 range.



    Read more: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2008/0...#ixzz0ynGgTxEe
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  4. #124
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    From June 25th WSG:

    "In March, Kodak's movie-film business, which had remained relatively steady
    even as camera film sales plunged, suffered a new blow when three big movie
    theater chains secured financing to convert 14,000 movie screens to digital
    projection by 2013. The funding is expected to accelerate the digital distribution
    of movies, giving Kodak less time to adapt to the long-anticipated decline in its
    film cash cow."

    A. Perez, in an interview.
    FYI, this is a way bigger worry, PE:

    http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.co...n-itunes-only/

  5. #125
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    From June 25th WSG:

    "In March, Kodak's movie-film business, which had remained relatively steady
    even as camera film sales plunged, suffered a new blow when three big movie
    theater chains secured financing to convert 14,000 movie screens to digital
    projection by 2013. The funding is expected to accelerate the digital distribution
    of movies, giving Kodak less time to adapt to the long-anticipated decline in its
    film cash cow."

    A. Perez, in an interview.
    FYI, this is a way bigger worry, PE:

    http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.co...n-itunes-only/

  6. #126
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Only if it takes off!

    What I posted is here, now!

    PE

  7. #127

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    PE,

    The "arts" cinema I frequent over here about once a week on average installed digital projection sometime last summer and uses these facilities for most new releases, and the quality of the presentation varies considerably from very good to DVD like. However, they still maintain 35mm projection for non first run films and other purposes. Aside from the high resolution potential of good film prints, I have noticed issues of colour quality / depth, and lack of good blacks with the digital projection systems; but I'm not intimate with the precise technology they are using.

    Tom

  8. #128
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Tom;

    Actually, the best digital theater presentation I ever saw was a prototype Kodak system at a local theater. They threw it at us as a "trade trial" about 2 years ago when I went with one of our grandson's to see a show. It was quite good. However, the worst was one of the SW movies which had a lot of digital artifacts and as you say, suffered a lot.

    PE

  9. #129
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    I haven't had time to read through this whole thread so this may have been asked but...I just saw a 3D movie at a local theater. It was most certainly digital projection . How come the movie companies couldn't print both of the images onto one film to make one film that contained all of the information?? The projector had a single lens. It was not traditional two lens projection but we were given the usual polarized glasses.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  10. #130

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    If 3-D has made a comeback then surely Smell-O-Vision can't be far behind?

    Perhaps EK can counter the latest digital onslaught with scratch 'n sniff film?
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..



 

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