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  1. #61

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    the film is still available as a special order, it is just
    removed from the line up of regularly produced films.

    it isn't all bad ...

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Sorry, but I see no surprise whatsoever in this announcement. No foot-shooting here at all. Just Kodak continuing to move toward its brave new world.

    Go Kodak Packaging! (See here for an explanation in the section titled "A new company.")

    Ken
    Keep in mind that an interview like that isn't for us, it's for investors, for Wall Street, the fund managers that hold Kodak stock. Those guys think film is a dead end, and if they see Kodak as making too much investment in film and not in stuff that will lead to future growth Kodak's stock price will go down. That is what is uppermost in Perez's mind.

  3. #63

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    I guess Wall Street got wind of the HUGE spike in film sales yesterday. EK stock is up nearly 10% this morning......
    John Bowen

  4. #64

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    John, let us know the next time you're ordering film so we can buy some stock.

  5. #65

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    Will do Barry, will do. But I doubt I'll need to buy any film for quite awhile.
    John Bowen

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moopheus View Post
    Keep in mind that an interview like that isn't for us...
    Granted.

    But at the same time it does serve to make Kodak's future plans a matter of public record for both investors and non-investors alike to see, including some non-investors who are also consumers of Kodak film products.

    We need only to listen carefully to what Kodak is telling us to know where they are going. They are a publicly held company, so I do not believe they are lying to us. Nobody wants to go to jail.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  7. #67
    lns
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moopheus View Post
    Keep in mind that an interview like that isn't for us, it's for investors, for Wall Street, the fund managers that hold Kodak stock. Those guys think film is a dead end, and if they see Kodak as making too much investment in film and not in stuff that will lead to future growth Kodak's stock price will go down. That is what is uppermost in Perez's mind.
    Let's not kid ourselves. Kodak thinks film is a dead end, too. For a company of that size, it probably is.

    We seem to be enduring the death by a thousand cuts of the film business of both Fuji and Kodak. It's a terrible process to watch. But think of how many films and papers have vanished over the years, and we still have film photography.

    -Laura

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Granted.

    But at the same time it does serve to make Kodak's future plans a matter of public record for both investors and non-investors alike to see, including some non-investors who are also consumers of Kodak film products.

    We need only to listen carefully to what Kodak is telling us to know where they are going. They are a publicly held company, so I do not believe they are lying to us. Nobody wants to go to jail.

    Ken
    We know that Kodak has been moving progressively to a digital focus for some time. This was a transformation that was begun under the previous CEO (Karp) in 2003.

    Nobody wants to go to jail, true, but over-analyzing CEO sound bites is sometimes futile. CEOs do not go to jail for changing their minds, do they? A good thing as re-organizations happen all the time.

    I'm not optimistic that EK will be in the film business for very much longer. But there is a possibility that the film division could be spun off or sold. There are some obstacles to doing so (toxic torts come to mind) - but one never knows.

    Regardless, I will continue to use whichever of their products appeal to me while they are still available. I do not think I need to apologize for this as there certainly seem to be plenty of folks who are not of similar mind and will give their business to others.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moopheus View Post
    Keep in mind that an interview like that isn't for us, it's for investors, for Wall Street, the fund managers that hold Kodak stock. Those guys think film is a dead end, and if they see Kodak as making too much investment in film and not in stuff that will lead to future growth Kodak's stock price will go down. That is what is uppermost in Perez's mind.
    True, and for good reason. Kodak will probably need to borrow money to continue their transformation and if the stock price goes down and debt-to-equity rises - their borrowing costs will increase. That could be deadly for them.

    I agree with your analysiis - Kodak can't really broadcast increased investment in film because it's not a growth business and its profitability is declining as raw materials increase in price. The increase in raw material prices could, I'm afraid, force the hands of a lot of the remaining manufacturers - not just Kodak.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by lns View Post
    Let's not kid ourselves. Kodak thinks film is a dead end, too. For a company of that size, it probably is.

    We seem to be enduring the death by a thousand cuts of the film business of both Fuji and Kodak. It's a terrible process to watch. But think of how many films and papers have vanished over the years, and we still have film photography.

    -Laura
    Fuji and Kodak might be too large - but it's a valid question as to whether Ilford, Adox, Foma et. al. are too small.

    I'm speaking here of raw material costs and availability. The manufacture of analog photographic materials requires the use of silver and rare earth metals. We have entered a period where not only there is increasing demand for these materials for industrial use (e.g. electric car batteries, etc.) but there is now increasing investor demand for these as well to hedge against currency declines. Add to this the fact that most of the rare earth metals are sourced from China - who have become sort of picky about who they are willing to export these to (witness the embargo of rare earth metals to Japan earlier this year) - and it isn't a stable picture.

    Of course these pressures could dissipate - but I would expect that the smaller manufacturers could encounter difficulty in continuing to operate if they persist for much longer.

    We will have to see, but I perceive that the long-term outlook has darkened a bit here. We've adjusted to declining demand for analog photo products (so have the remaining manufacturers) but the material cost/availability issues are something else entirely. I do not see any adjustment possible here (except for charging more for the finished product) - the issues simply have to go away.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..



 

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