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  1. #271

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Who said that?
    You did. I was referring to:

    It's that correlation between their energy and how colour sensitive thingies treat them again.
    So it's how 'color sensitive thingies' (which I shortened to 'detectors') and photon energy interact.

    That's 'anything goes' talk.
    What's energy then, apart from whatever you want it to be?
    Um, no? Photon energy, frequency, and wavelength are all essentially the same quantity, expressed in different ways. It's not anything goes.

  2. #272
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Then let me present you with that same question i have put to you a number of times before. The question you have avoided answering:
    How do you explain the fact that emulsions are not blind to sodium light?

    Blatant nonsense, your two photon/tri-colour theory.
    You and Ron should do a video debate. Should be very entertaining

  3. #273
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    If you look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium-vapor_lamp you see the spectrum of Sodium vapor at 600 nm. If you look at Kodak's web site here: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4050/e4050.pdf you will see that film typically has sensitivity at 600 nm. That is how a film can see the light of a Sodium lamp.

    PE

  4. #274

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Then let me present you with that same question i have put to you a number of times before. The question you have avoided answering:
    How do you explain the fact that emulsions are not blind to sodium light?

    Blatant nonsense, your two photon/tri-colour theory.
    I assume you are talking about B/W emulsion w/o presumed sensitivity in that region...

    "Ordinary" (meaning blue sensitive, non-spectrally sensitized) emulsions
    are also sensitive to red!

    I know one possible explanation,
    but I suspect your POV might related here as an additional explanation.

    Q. G., Is it too complicated to show us how it works?
    Last edited by Ray Rogers; 02-09-2011 at 04:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #275

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    If you look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium-vapor_lamp you see the spectrum of Sodium vapor at 600 nm. If you look at Kodak's web site here: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4050/e4050.pdf you will see that film typically has sensitivity at 600 nm. That is how a film can see the light of a Sodium lamp.

    PE
    But is it:

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    "2 photons with a Green energy level and a Red energy level,"
    or

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    "one photon with an intermediate energy level between Red and Green captured in 2 layers"
    ?

    It's, of course, neither.

  6. #276

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    So it's how 'color sensitive thingies' (which I shortened to 'detectors') and photon energy interact.
    Why, yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    Um, no? Photon energy, frequency, and wavelength are all essentially the same quantity, expressed in different ways. It's not anything goes.
    Anything goes talk is that
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray
    they just have an energy/wavelength/frequency, depending on how you want to think about it.
    Energy, frequency and wavelength are indeed three different aspects of an entity.
    They're not the same "quantity" expressed in different ways.

  7. #277

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
    I assume you are talking about B/W emulsion w/o presumed sensitivity in that region...

    "Ordinary" (meaning blue sensitive, non-spectrally sensitized) emulsions
    are also sensitive to red!

    I know one possible explanation,
    but I suspect your POV might related here as an additional explanation.

    I guess its probably too complicated for you (Q. G.) to show us how it works?
    Migh, migh... Ray!

  8. #278

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Energy, frequency and wavelength are indeed three different aspects of an entity.
    They're not the same "quantity" expressed in different ways.
    Sorry, I should have been pedantically precise in my language. The energy of a photon is related to it's frequency by the expression E = h nu, where h is Planck's constant and nu is the frequency. Frequency and wavelength are related through another expression nu = c / lambda, where c is a constant (speed of light) and lambda is the wavelength.

    A photon with a given energy has a frequency and wavelength that are dependent only on the energy. While they have different physical meanings (obviously - one is an energy, one is a length, and one is frequency), they are not independent quantities; set one and the others are fixed.

    As to the first part - so photons don't have colors. They have energies, and color is how the detector 'interprets' that energy.

  9. #279

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    Sorry, I should have been pedantically precise in my language. [...]
    If you think it's about language, the optics 1.0.1. explanation i snipped away would be rather empty and redundant.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    As to the first part - so photons don't have colors. They have energies, and color is how the detector 'interprets' that energy.
    How many times do you want to have that repeated? How many times do you want to repeat that yourself?

    Photons also have wavelengths (well... they don't. Waves have wavelengths), and colour is how the detector 'interprets' that wavelength.

    Photons also have [etc.]

  10. #280
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    Actually, a film exposed to pure sodium vapor lamp light sees a stream of photons with the energy level that causes the appearance of "yellow" light with a frequency of 600 nm (Red + Green). These photons excite two layers of a color film, the Red and Green layers, thus producing a "Yellow" record which is minus Blue. If anyone has another opinion, they can post it in detail. I have given the two applicable references, the Sodium vapor wavelength and the Kodak film sensitivity curves.

    I await another explanation that that stream of 600 nm photons.

    PE



 

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