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  1. #11
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Sal, at this point all I have is uninformed speculation!

    I suspect that the smallest runners might vanish (sizes and product kinds).

    Basically, production capability will be about 1/2 of what it was but if the machines were only running part time, this is a good thing because now 1 machine can run full time. It means a lot of people are out of work.

    Basically it is a mixed blessing. But, it does bring us 1 step closer to the end.

    PE
    The problem is that there will be an end, not just to film but to still photography. People, especially young people, need more action..video..3d video..special effects..

  2. #12

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    This is really very upsetting.

  3. #13
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Yes, this is indeed sad. Especially for those who may have a personal connection. But I don't think it's necessarily upsetting. There IS life after Kodak. While it may be the end game of choice for a once mighty player, the game itself remains.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  4. #14
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Ken;

    Regarding your "signature line", what happened to all of the yolks. And, when Albumen printing went out of business, more to the point, what happened to all of the egg farmers?

    PE

  5. #15
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    Don't put all your eggs in one basket... this is the problem with color photography. Both Kodak and Fuji could presumably exit the market. While many are making B&W film, if Kodak and Fuji exit color that will leave us with what, Lucky in China? Ferrania in Italy?
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    Don't put all your eggs in one basket... this is the problem with color photography. Both Kodak and Fuji could presumably exit the market. While many are making B&W film, if Kodak and Fuji exit color that will leave us with what, Lucky in China? Ferrania in Italy?
    Well if one or the other stops making film, the one that continues will get the whole market and probably have to increase production.

  7. #17
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Regarding your "signature line", what happened to all of the yolks. And, when Albumen printing went out of business, more to the point, what happened to all of the egg farmers?
    Albumen printing did not go out of business. The Dresden Albumenizing Company went out of business. The game remained. And remains to this day.

    (And as a current APUG advertiser, no less!)



    It's just no longer a 60,000 eggs per day mass market game - presumably to the chicken's great relief. But just because the largest albumen player of its day chose to fold did not mean albumen printing folded with it.

    So it is with traditional film photography now. The manufacturing base has similarly adjusted to a new reduced level of demand, and Kodak has chosen to reduce - and in many cases eliminate - their participation at that new level. Other manufacturers have chosen to stand pat, or to increase their participation. It's just business.

    Kodak was at one point all about Photography, but Photography has never been only all about Kodak...

    And as far as the egg farmers go, if today I should disdain purchasing modern, commercially-produced albumen paper and decide to go it alone, I need only buy a dozen eggs from the grocery store to have supported via the albumen process at least one egg farmer out there somewhere.

    Ken
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 05-29-2011 at 12:09 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Removed [Edit]...
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #18
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Ken;

    That was my point in bringing up the subject and you expressed it well! Kodak was all about photography but photography was not all about Kodak.

    PE

  9. #19
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Regarding your "signature line", what happened to all of the yolks.
    And what of the yolks?

    From the Journal of Photography of the George Eastman House, Volume IV, Number 4, April 1955, p.25 (first page):

    "So great was the demand for this popular product that the Dresden Albumenizing Company, the largest in the world, used 60,000 eggs each day. Girls did nothing all day long but break eggs and separate the whites from the yolks. The whites were then churned and the yolks sold to leather dressers for finishing kid and fine leathers."

    It's also interesting to note that the accompanying advertisement depicts a rather handsome chicken announcing the albumen paper to be "Easy Working!" "No Blisters!" "Extra Brilliant." and available at a cost of $1.00 for a dozen sheets.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  10. #20

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    Sorry about the bad news. I hope the other film companies pick up the slack.

    Jeff

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