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  1. #81
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude
    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    I'll give you five.
    Pay me and I'll take them off your hands.
    Drat! Sniped on APUG.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  2. #82
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    Heh-heh-heh...
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  3. #83

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    Over the 2010 holidays I walked into the local Urban Outfitters and was quite shocked to find a huge display, just inside the door, of all things retro. The display included Holgas, Lomo cameras, and these weird platterss with spindles that held some plastic disk and made sounds :-)

    If we can get the kids to believe retro is cool (do kids today still say cool?) film will have a much longer life. Everybody buy your kid/grandkid a Holga or Lomo camera this year!
    John Bowen

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgjbowen
    Over the 2010 holidays I walked into the local Urban Outfitters and was quite shocked to find a huge display, just inside the door, of all things retro. The display included Holgas, Lomo cameras, and these weird platterss with spindles that held some plastic disk and made sounds :-)

    If we can get the kids to believe retro is cool (do kids today still say cool?) film will have a much longer life. Everybody buy your kid/grandkid a Holga or Lomo camera this year!
    Find them a Brownie Hawkeye with a real lens and hope like crazy they catch the fever. I'm in the camp that believes the Holga fad won't sustain itself once the novelty wears off
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    No new cameras doesn't mean no film, or no new films, IMO. The digital revolution brought a huge amount of perfectly fine film cameras on the second-hand market and that killed the market for new film cameras. Film sales certainly declined but did so with a very different pattern. That's not to say that film sales haven't been shrinking in the last ten years, they surely have, but at by far a different rate than film cameras.

    If I get all the figures more or less right - I'm going by heart here, don't quote my figures - film cameras virtually ceased selling already in 2002 - 2003. Ten years after the "revolution", there are only a couple camera producers (Cosina and Nikon, maybe Canon) in the consumer market. Then there are all the Leica, Rolleiflex, Alpa, Arca-Swiss, Hasselblad and many others and all the LF producers. It's niche market but it is meaningful they are still alive. The fact that some firms producing enlargers still produce them today is also noticeable.

    Film products, on the other hand, is mostly still alive. Practically all film producers that were alive 10 years ago are alive now, with the exception of Konica - Sakura. Agfa still produces film (as an OEM). Most chemicals producers are still alive.

    Some are just prematurely singing the de profundis to an industry in a sad anticipation of a death which so far did not knock at the door.

    If you see it in terms of "surviving catalogue", as far as film cameras are concerned possibly 98% of the year 2000 catalogue is out of production, while in the film and chemistry sectors probably 95% of the year 2000 catalogue survived.

    Actually if we get an "almanac" of the photographic market of the year 1990, some twenty years ago, we might discover that film offering is much broader now than it was then.

    Personally I have worries only about the continuation of mass-market laboratories, which I see as the weak ring in the chain.

    Film cameras are very easy to manufacture: just take a digital camera (any), and adapt it. When the demand for new film cameras rises again, producers will be easily able to produce film versions or their digital cameras. Or maybe even Jeckyll-Hyde versions, with interchangeable backs, one for film, the other for digital (à la Leica R9 or better).

    The sky is still solidly resting on its feet
    Digital photography allowed me to buy a ton of medium format gear I never would have bought..Evan Clarke

  6. #86
    CGW
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    Film products, on the other hand, is mostly still alive. Practically all film producers that were alive 10 years ago are alive now, with the exception of Konica - Sakura. Agfa still produces film (as an OEM). Most chemicals producers are still alive.

    Some are just prematurely singing the de profundis to an industry in a sad anticipation of a death which so far did not knock at the door.

    If you see it in terms of "surviving catalogue", as far as film cameras are concerned possibly 98% of the year 2000 catalogue is out of production, while in the film and chemistry sectors probably 95% of the year 2000 catalogue survived.


    This is a bit silly. "Not dead yet" isn't much use in understanding the dive in film sales/output over the past decade. That's what matters. Film may not be dead but it's beginning to smell funny.

    film cameras are very easy to manufacture: just take a digital camera (any), and adapt it. When the demand for new film cameras rises again, producers will be easily able to produce film versions or their digital cameras. Or maybe even Jeckyll-Hyde versions, with interchangeable backs, one for film, the other for digital (à la Leica R9 or better).


    Not sure I want any of the stuff you're smoking.

  7. #87
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    CGW, the interchangeable back road is what allows MF gear to be used for film and digital. I can't see why this cannot be done in the future in 135. Leica did it once and did not make it for the M series for a different set of problems.

    Pessimism is the attitude of the loser.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #88
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    CGW, the interchangeable back road is what allows MF gear to be used for film and digital. I can't see why this cannot be done in the future in 135. Leica did it once and did not make it for the M series for a different set of problems.
    Pessimism is the attitude of the loser.
    Perhaps you were napping when this happened:

    http://www.dpreview.com/news/0209/02...nfilmagain.asp

    Pessimism(more like realism here) isn't in the DSM-IV but delusional disorder is. Cheers!
    Last edited by CGW; 06-09-2011 at 09:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #89
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Perhaps you were napping when this happened:

    http://www.dpreview.com/news/0209/02...nfilmagain.asp
    Precisely yes I was taking pictures using film, if you call this "napping". When I use film - and I also use digital, incidentally - I am not too concerned in what will happen in ten years. I am using film today because I find it. When I don't find it anymore, THEN I will not use it anymore.

    We have to die one day, but if we constantly think about death, we cannot live any more. Live the day.

    You know the saying: Who is afraid dies every day. The hero dies only once.

    Don't be afraid. Die once.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by KanFotog View Post
    It's probably wishful thinking but I think we're going to see a resurgence of sorts in film.

    A dealer here in Mumbai was telling me Lomo is planning to launch in India. Their target date seems to be somewhere in July or August this year.

    Going by that I figure once people have used the Lomos, maybe they'll be interested in the regular stuff too?
    *crosses fingers*
    They are not only going to India in the next months. Some days ago they have opened a new shop in Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Next they will go to the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, Suisse, Turkey, Mexico, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Phillipines.
    And will extend their operations by openning new shops in USA, England, Germany, France, China.
    Lomo it not a fad. This movement is 20 years old. And still rapidly growing.
    Because they do an very effective marketing, and do a great job in encouraging people to use film.
    Not like lots of apuggers here, which definitely discourage new users to use film by all their permanent doom and gloom and sky is falling praying.

    Do you want to join a club which is permanently debating it's own closure? Of course not!
    You will go on and join a club with a positive outlook.

    That is what Lomo do: Their slogan is "the future is analogue". They have a positive outlook, that is attractive for young people.
    Lomo know very well that economics is 50% psychology. If people believe in the future of a system, they will buy.



 

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