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  1. #31
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lionel1972 View Post
    I wonder why there is not as much concern expressed for transparency film to be find among the APUG community. Come on we need to support E6 full force, let's not let it die as we did Kodachrome. E6 is the analog process that needs it the most right now.
    In the pre-digi-devolution of the pro market, when transparencies were king, this process seemed highly regarded and the lattitude and exposure limitations didn't seem to be a valid point to prefer color neg over it. Now that the pro market has switched mostly to digital and that the mass-market of everyday people have forgotten about the experience and benefits of projecting slides, the market for E6 has shrinked dangerously. We need to revamp the concept and find smart ways to sell it to as many people as possible. Now is actually a great time to do so, with all those youngsters and new comers from the digital world starting to discover how much analog photography processes can bring to their practice and enjoyment of photography. I admire what Lomography has already achieved in promoting analog photography in a way few people could predict. I dream of someone coming up with a complete DIY at home kit for developing and viewing slides of all sizes (including 3D). They could sell it in partnership with Lomography for example: a small batch developping machine (à la Jobo ATL 1500), E6 films and chemistry, and a portable lightbox with a good loupe or any other smart new device that would be able to provide similar practical viewing experience as an iPad does. Hip and clever marketing to promote medium and large format transparencies as what they really are: one of the most awesome photographic medium ever created.
    For much of N. America, quality E6 processing was the first casualty in the digital onslaught. Pros simply stopped shooting it as digital files became the industry standard. Film prices rose, labs closed E6 lines, quality fell and processing prices jumped. Small batch E6 processing became problematic when Kodak killed its kits--something that shut a few JOBO garage labs in my area. Friends still have occasional "Jurassic" nights with 6x6 and 67 slide shows but it's obvious they've lost interest as labs thin out. It's a very hard sell in 2011.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Several of us mentioned this in another thread, but if you like and miss Astia probably the closest replacement is Kodak E100G. It's a bit more contrasty but only a bit, less contrasty than, say, Portra (which I find too contrasty for general use, YMMV.) I've been shooting it in 35mm and like it a lot, and it's available in all sizes up to and including 8x10.
    I wouldn't mind so much if the extra layers which enabled Astia to handle mixed lighting were present in Provia. I shoot a lot at night in mixed lighting and filter correcting for fluorescent often knocks off the overall, plus often the fluorescent lighting in one picture varies depending on type and age of sources. Astia was a big help in minimizing that. Digital doesn't have the same ability. So it's a shame that a way in which film is clearly superior doesn't get preserved.
    Astia's lower contrast helped the images also, so together with its great resistance to reciprocity failure and fine grain it was my favorite by far.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Several of us mentioned this in another thread, but if you like and miss Astia probably the closest replacement is Kodak E100G. It's a bit more contrasty but only a bit, less contrasty than, say, Portra (which I find too contrasty for general use, YMMV.) I've been shooting it in 35mm and like it a lot, and it's available in all sizes up to and including 8x10.
    I like it for daylight work-it's very nice, and I'm saying that as a former Kodachrome user. It is important to bear in mind as this shrinking continues, that there was a time when chrome film selection was very limited. There were K-25 and K-64, Ektachrome at ASA 64 and High Speed Ektachrome at ASA 160, and Fujichrome, Agfachrome, etc. Mostly I stuck with the K-films and used some Fuji and Agfachrome. I liked Agfachrome much more than Ektachrome; I considered it to be much more compatible with Kodachrome color-wise. Fujichrome was always to me rather gaudy, which to me is one reason Astia was so exceptional.
    So even as selection shrinks, I can't say I have it worse than I did when I started, and for a long time after that. We've had it really good for the past couple decades. Not much consolation, but a little perspective, given the way things are now.
    Last edited by lxdude; 09-08-2011 at 08:11 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    I like it for daylight work-it's very nice, and I'm saying that as a former Kodachrome user. It is important to bear in mind as this shrinking continues, that there was a time when chrome film selection was very limited. There were K-25 and K-64, Ektachrome at ASA 64 and High Speed Ektachrome at ASA 160, and Fujichrome, Agfachrome, etc. Mostly I stuck with the K-films and used some Fuji and Agfachrome. I liked Agfachrome much more than Ektachrome; I considered it to be much more compatible with Kodachrome color-wise. Fujichrome was always to me rather gaudy, which is one reason Astia was so exceptional.
    So even as selection shrinks, I can't say I have it worse than I did when I started, and for a long time after that. We've had it really good for the past couple decades. Not much consolation, but a little perspective, given the way things are now.
    I remember those days too, albeit barely.

    And thanks to your quote I edited my message. I had meant to say that E100G was less contrasty than Provia, not Portra. It is certainly contrastier than Portra or most other neg films!

  5. #35
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    If it was easier to print transperancies I wouldn't be using print film at all.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    If it was easier to print transperancies I wouldn't be using print film at all.
    With type R paper it WAS easier, and is arguably easier in some ways with Ilfochrome. At least, color balance is easier. The process was far less touchy and critical, the filter pack seemed to change less from one image to another on the same type of film (as in, pretty much not at all per emulsion batch of paper if properly exposed in even remotely similar light) and perhaps best of all you had a positive original with which to compare the result. Against that the contrast is higher, particularly with Ilfochrome - sometimes not a problem, other times you'll need to learn masking (which I never did, just straight prints with dodge and burn) and the cost of type R somewhat higher and Ilfochrome higher still, though on the RC Ilfochrome nowhere near what it costs now.

    I still have type R prints I made in high school. Some have faded but most are in good shape. I've no idea why some faded and some didn't as they were the same paper, Kodak type 2203, and same chemistry, Unicolor whatever-it-was. Ah, the old days...but modern RA4 is very good and easy in other ways.

  7. #37
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    It is incredibly frustrating to me that they can hold on to three Velvias, yet axe the two most useful and beautiful transparency films they have IMO. The lack of demand for T64 and Astia, yet the existence of a market for three varieties of Velvia, says a lot to me about the current stylistic trends in photography. It's too bad, as my work on film is not generally in line with those trends.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I still have type R prints I made in high school. Some have faded but most are in good shape. I've no idea why some faded and some didn't as they were the same paper, Kodak type 2203, and same chemistry, Unicolor whatever-it-was. Ah, the old days...but modern RA4 is very good and easy in other ways.
    The "superior archival properties" that are often touted for type R prints are true, but they do not take into account the fact that they are still sensitive to UV light and to processing quality. Ilfochromes will start to fade in under an hour if you take them out into bright sun. We tested this on the roof at the museum exhibit preparation company at which I used to work.

    I would suspect a processing issue if some of your prints are faded and others are fine, yet they were stored identically.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #39
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    I used to shoot chromes almost exclusively except when I knew I just wanted 4x6 prints for snapshots. I loved Fuji R paper too but now I just shoot negative film as I can easily develop and print it at home. E6 labs don't give me good results anymore, haven't for years really. Even if I did E6 at home people run when I bring out the slide projector so unfortunately its C-41 and B&W for me these days, sorry chromes...
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  10. #40
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    I came too late to the party for R-type printing unfortunately. When I first discovered my dad's old catalogues in which a variety of this mysterious paper was listed, I felt pretty sad that it had gone away.

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