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  1. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by semi-ambivalent View Post
    Companies have in the past closed their doors one day and opened them up the next with new stock and zero debt. I have lost a little money in a company that did just that.
    s-a
    I think you are describing bankruptcy. It can be done. but generally it only works if there is a viable business model post-bankruptcy. Fruit of the Loom may be a good example (though strictly speaking Fruit didn't exactly become an operating company post-bankruptcy, though its product line and trade name did continue.)

    On the other hand, do you remember TWA? It was once one of the largest airline companies. TWA declared bankruptcy three times, gradually shrinking to practically nothing before it was mercifully put out of its misery by being acquired by AMR, the parent company of American Airlines.

  2. #112
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanrockwood View Post

    On the other hand, do you remember TWA? It was once one of the largest airline companies. TWA declared bankruptcy three times, gradually shrinking to practically nothing before it was mercifully put out of its misery by being acquired by AMR, the parent company of American Airlines.
    Had it kept on, it would have had to change its name to Trans-County Airlines.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  3. #113

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    Quote Originally Posted by alanrockwood View Post
    I think you are describing bankruptcy. It can be done. but generally it only works if there is a viable business model post-bankruptcy. Fruit of the Loom may be a good example (though strictly speaking Fruit didn't exactly become an operating company post-bankruptcy, though its product line and trade name did continue.)
    Kmart is a good example. They went through bankruptcy and are still around in some form or another, still doing what they used to do. I'm unclear on the details of its merger with Sears, but still - they have discount department stores still open. I think if Kodak went through bankruptcy and emerged from the other side and the film division continued to make great films, even if someone else owned them, we would be happy.

    Oh, and obviously Ilford is another good example, and a particularly relevant one at that.

  4. #114

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    Kmart is a good example. They went through bankruptcy and are still around in some form or another, still doing what they used to do. I'm unclear on the details of its merger with Sears, but still - they have discount department stores still open. I think if Kodak went through bankruptcy and emerged from the other side and the film division continued to make great films, even if someone else owned them, we would be happy.

    Oh, and obviously Ilford is another good example, and a particularly relevant one at that.
    I'm thinking that could happen, but Kodak's culture would die and that could be grim for the pensioner's. Film is film but there's a human side to things like this and often fairness is tended to last in the process.

    s-a

  5. #115
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Bankruptcy would result in the Kodak shares being worthless - just a little bit sad for all those Kodak employees (and others) who hold those shares because they believe in the organization.

    I know belief is a lousy investment strategy, but for a very long time it was one that made Kodak a very good place to work (and invest in).
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by semi-ambivalent View Post
    I'm thinking that could happen, but Kodak's culture would die and that could be grim for the pensioner's. Film is film but there's a human side to things like this and often fairness is tended to last in the process.
    Very true, but I'm not entirely sure what I, or any of us, can do about that side of things.

  7. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Bankruptcy would result in the Kodak shares being worthless - just a little bit sad for all those Kodak employees (and others) who hold those shares because they believe in the organization.

    I know belief is a lousy investment strategy, but for a very long time it was one that made Kodak a very good place to work (and invest in).
    I spoke with a Kodak pensioner recently who said his Kodak stock value was so low already that he cashed out and used the proceeds to buy an iPad. He didn't even seem to have enough change left over to buy a cup of coffee. He was sad about the whole affair, but pragmatic since he has other sources of income that allows him to have a nice retirement.

  8. #118

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    Kodak shares have lost over 96% of their value in a little over four years (since June of 2007) and more than 98.6% of their value since since peaking 15 years ago (October of 1996). With a negative net asset value and slim profit margins, much of which are in a business sector with rapidly declining revenues, it is hard to see how Kodak can recover.

    The recent sale of some of Kodak's intellectual property may or may not bode well for the long term, but a one-time sale of key technology (if that's what it was) is not a good sign for the long-term viability of the company.

  9. #119

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    Kodak can only survive if it can expand beyond imaging. Over the years they should have been a Xerox or Konica/Minolta if they were truly an imaging company. I never understood why Kodak let Xerox do what it did without challenge.

    But I think they look more like 3M with coated films and papers. There are lots of avenues that can be explored in the coated products. Tapes, industrial films, solar coatings and pvc's, automotive finishing, maybe even aerospace applications.

    I can imagine advanced home wall coverings that replace paint and maybe even provide color changes throughout the day.

    They started the OLED thing but where has that gone?

    For all I know they already do these things but I've not heard of it.
    - Bill Lynch

  10. #120
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanrockwood View Post
    Kodak shares have lost over 96% of their value in a little over four years (since June of 2007) and more than 98.6% of their value since since peaking 15 years ago (October of 1996). With a negative net asset value and slim profit margins, much of which are in a business sector with rapidly declining revenues, it is hard to see how Kodak can recover.

    The recent sale of some of Kodak's intellectual property may or may not bode well for the long term, but a one-time sale of key technology (if that's what it was) is not a good sign for the long-term viability of the company.
    So when did you short the stock? With your constant drumbeat of negativity, it sounds like you might have an ulterior motive.



 

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