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  1. #131
    kraker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike c View Post
    Two cards today,one from Laurent frozen sleuth gate as kraker siad with some frozen weed growing up thur the cracks
    Now it's time to ask Laurent...

    Some see frozen weed, some (I) see water, frozen in time by the photographer. Did you send two different cards, or can you enlighten us what it really is are looking at?

    shuttr.net
    -- A sinister little midget with a bucket and a mop / Where the blood goes down the drain --

  2. #132
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Four cards today -- a welcome sight after all the rain we've been getting!

    A nice colour print from anikin of quirky chess players. The interesting thing is though -- you're not on my list Eugene! I'll try and see if I can find another postcard left to send you in thanks.

    Another 5x7 print also arrived from David James Lee of a place I know very well -- the Louvre! You've got just enough of it in to make it recognizable, but not so much to be cliche. Thanks for the reminder of one of my favorite cities in the world.

    And speaking of France, Laurent's frosty wood and weeds/grass works great as a straight print with all the details, but also in a more abstract way with the juxtaposition of the straight lines of the wood and the curves of the weeds. Add the nails and you've got a Picasso-like face. I like this one a lot!

    Finally, from PhotoJim, a great derelict house in rural Saskatchewan -- one of my favorite places to roam the backroads looking for interesting buildings. I always seemed to have more luck in Saskatchewan rather than in rural Manitoba (where I'm from) in finding these kind of sights that are photo-worthy. Thanks Jim, for this little slice of home.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  3. #133

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    Quote Originally Posted by kraker View Post
    Now it's time to ask Laurent...

    Some see frozen weed, some (I) see water, frozen in time by the photographer. Did you send two different cards, or can you enlighten us what it really is are looking at?
    Please excuse my English,was in a hurry.Frosty weed and wood at a diagonal angle.Very nice.
    Mike

  4. #134
    Patrick Latour's Avatar
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    Here are the ones for today:

    PhotoJim: One of the sharpest photographs I have ever seen. Even at that distance you can almost count the nails in the planks in this abandoned building. As the icing on the cake, a nice word, written in French, on the back. Your French is very good Jim, probably better than my English. Merci beaucoup, c'est une image très appréciée.

    Kevin Kehler: Since I love old buildings, I definitely have to go spend some time in the praires. Another sharp photographs. I love the tones on that door, and the textures, a real eye candy. I try to imagine all the hands that have touched this door handle. Nicely print. Thank you very much.

    For your information Kevin, the Abbotsford where I live is a small village of around 2000 of population, at the feet of a mountain, founded by some loyalists in the middle of the 19th century. Probably very different of the Abbotsford where you are from.

    anikin: It is decided, I have to try to print in colors. Those figures are gorgeous, I feel the urge to play with them, their glossy look is perfectly shown. I have been really surprise when I saw the exposure time. Never heard of the SLIMT technique. I have to do a search on the forums about that. Thank you, it is really appreciated.
    - Note to self: Next time processing a film, take notice of the shape of the beer bottle and the shape of the fixer bottle, and note the differences. -

  5. #135
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Latour View Post

    Kevin Kehler:

    For your information Kevin, the Abbotsford where I live is a small village of around 2000 of population, at the feet of a mountain, founded by some loyalists in the middle of the 19th century. Probably very different of the Abbotsford where you are from.
    Thanks for the kind words, I was wondering if anyone had gotten any of mine as the girl behind the postal counter was new and didn't understand why I needed so many stamps.

    Abbotsford (on the West Coast) is also at the foot of a small mountain but has over 200k people, with about 1/2 from South East Asia. Wonderful town, terrible weather for B&W photography as it is grey a lot. On the other hand, they think +5 in January is bitterly cold.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  6. #136
    sly
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    I'm hoping most of my cards have made it to their destination by now. Time to start plotting what I'll do for the next round.

    My postcard display board is filling up - since the first flush I have recieved:
    Ben Taylor's Norwich Lion - I'm familiar with these lions, as Norwich is stop whenever we're in England, but I've never seen snow on them before. Nice range of tones in the print.
    Ozphoto's Coffe Cup - so gorgeous and appealing it almost makes me wish coffee was drinkable.
    HMV's mysterious windmill - very clever.
    DRPSilver's Tafoni - looks exactly like rock formations found locally. Irresistable to photographers.
    Johnnywalker's banjo player - catches his concentration very well.
    PhotoJim's old farm building - lovely range of tones and I like the way cloud streaks at the top of the photo echo the grass at the bottom.
    And todays' arrival - another abandonded building in Saskatchewan from Kevin - very detailed and tactile - it's surprising not to feel the roughness of that old door when you touch the picture.

  7. #137
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    More in the mail today - I'm developing quite a pile.

    Jim (PhotoJim) - The sky gets me in this, big puffy white clouds. If you'd used a big whack of red filter to bring them out they wouldn't be as nice. Just soft, and it contrasts nicely with the grass in the foreground. Reminds me a lot of the area we lived when I was quite young, in the scrubland here in South Australia.
    Laurent - Ah, Pan F! Where would we be without it. Lovely photo, I love the running silky water with the big steel bolted doors. Great tones too - just lovely to look at.
    David James Lee - I really do dig the tones in this, exactly as you'd expect a nice overcast, rainy day to feel. You can see the little rain drops on the umbrellas, and the big glass form of the Louvre Pyramid isn't obvious at first, but it's a nice subtle background
    John (JohnnyWalker) - I do seem to insist on saying what certain photos remind me of, but the guy's the spitting image of my uncle, who passed away a few years ago. He drove a bulldozer until the day he died, and use to keep his dynamite in the living room. Lovely blacks and whites, and a paper I've not seen much of before.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  8. #138
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    I got yours, Kevin - I'll make comments on the dozen or so I have soon, as soon as I have some time!

    Thanks for all the kind words, all, about my card - I am really pleased that you like it.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  9. #139

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    My cards are finally out. It's been more work than I thought, but a lot of fun as well!
    Thank you all for your nice comments about my cards.

    Rachelle, you were not on my list, but I had couple of prints left over, so I decided to send them
    to the people on the address correction list. Enjoy!

    Patrick, yes 8 seconds. I had ISO 100 film in my camera, it was inside a dimply lit museum and I could not use the flash.
    I needed very small aperture (about f/16) to increase depth of field, so I calculated I needed about 6-8 seconds exposure.
    So I was standing there, camera on tripod pressed tightly against the display glass, and me holding the button and counting: 1001,1002,1003, etc ;-)
    These postcards were the first time I used SLIMT technique to control contrast on modern digital color papers. The results are
    not bad, but few of the postcards came out with a different color tone. I still need to work on my technique...

    I have received 7 postcards so far:

    Lilian: Your cyanotype is just amazing! It's really a work of art. I've been battling the urge to try cyanotype myself since receiving
    your postcard. I'm just worried that I'm yet not proficient enough in the darkroom to succeed at it. Hopefully, one day... Oh, by the
    way, when you look at the postcard upside-down, it makes a mysterious flower-like abstract. If I had a big print, that's how I
    would hang it on the wall. Really, just amazing.

    Laurent: What a moment! The gates are opening and something is just about to happen. The picture of sharp gates and shining moving water. It's like a first sentence of a captivating book - you just can't take your eyes off of it, it just makes you want to learn more...

    Darwin: It's all about texture. It's funny, I know it's a rock, but to me it reminds of the foam on the ocean waves. Beautiful abstract!

    Alex: Yes, it's a scene in a movie. The lamp post, the actress, and the night city. Beautiful. I just don't get it how you managed to get such smooth grain-less appearance with 1600EI exposure. And what a balance of shadow and highlight detail! Just a masterpiece. I have a question for you: did you use some kind of a filter on your lens? When I'm looking at the lamp post lights in the distance I see diagonal streaks of light. This adds nice feeling of motion to the picture. I'd like to learn how to replicate such an effect. Can you share, please?

    Mick: Very, very unusual light in your portrait. Stunning model. Her expression reminds me of an Olympic diver standing on the springboard just a moment before her gold medal jump. You captured the moment beautifully.

    PhotoJim: Ah, the old house. The white clouds in just the right spot to highlight the house. This beautiful capture just makes you look and imagine the story of people who lived in that home...

    Steve Brown: Now, that's just cruel. Did you really think you can get away with it? You should be banned from all future postcard exchanges and not reinstated until you send me a case of samples from that place. No excuses accepted! ;-)
    Oh well, really nice picture, and great job of toning. I'm just sad I can't make the remaining few steps to that door...

  10. #140
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    Some thoughts:

    Laurent: Enjoy the print, like the silky water and contrast with the metal on the door.

    PhotoJim: Yes, have seen this before but it is still nice to see another person's take on a familiar subject. Nice use of subtlety which is much harder than overtness. Expect a call/PM for beer shortly.

    mooseontheloose: this makes me giggle, the smile on his face. My favorite part of you print is size of image and use of negative space; if you make the image larger on the card, it loses its' "cuteness".

    Mick Fagan: My eyes keep traveling upwards and wondering what she is looking at. Very nice high key image.

    Drpsilver: I think anytime you have to look at a print and try to decide what it is of, that is a good thing. Reminds me of honeycomb on the inside of a candybar.

    Sly: I have never held a cyanotype before and this just makes me want to try. The intimate nature of the print is wonderful.

    I have to say, I am impressed with all I have received. Great way to see other and be inspired.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger



 

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