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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk
    What's the difference between a banquet camera and a panoramic camera? For example, I've heard 7X17s called banquet cameras, but the nameplate on my 7X17 Korona says "Panoramic View"

    Banquet simply refers to swing-lens panoramic cameras, so-called because photogs would line up their subjects (a crowd) in an arc around the camera. Finished image looks like everybody's in a straight line. Giveaway is that buildings in the background are distorted. Once you've ID'd one shot like this, you start seeing them everywhere.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy Hamon
    And if you want a cheap, though very low quality, panoramic camera, outfit a Holga or a MF folder for 35 mm film...never tried it, but I might do so soon...
    Except that technique doesn't widen the actual field of view, it just lobs off the top and bottom of the neg.

    Probably the cheapest / easiest way is to get a manual 35mm camera. Mount it to a tripod so that the camera can rotate about its nodal point.

    Take your series of shots, rotating the camera on the tripod, and allowing lots of overlap on the images, and using the same exposure and focus settings for each image.

    Scan them all at once, again to limit exposure differences.

    Then Photomerge them together in Photoshop.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk
    What's the difference between a banquet camera and a panoramic camera? For example, I've heard 7X17s called banquet cameras, but the nameplate on my 7X17 Korona says "Panoramic View"
    Some panoramic purists maintain that a true panoramic camera must rotate or at least have a swinging lens. Others (including presumably Korona, and I rather side with them) regard this as nonsense and use 'panoramic' for any long, thin format.

    Banquet cameras were of course used for taking large groups of people at e.g. banquets. The scope for overlap is clearly wide (sorry, pun not intended but hard to resist after accidentally making it).

    Edit: I had never heard the term 'banquet' applied to swing-lens cameras before Doug suggested it. This doesn't mean either of us is wrong, just that I'd never heard it.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)

  4. #14

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    I've started playing with Horizon Perfekt, a 35mm full panorama camera that gives 58mm image width. It can be had for $400-500 brand new in the US. I've found a couple of problems, but it is a very usable camera. I have described the camera here:

    http://wiki.silvergrain.org/wiki/ind...orizon_Perfekt

    The page will expand with more photos to illustrate the point, especially when modifying the camera to adjust the focusing distance, etc.

  5. #15
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    Well, since I started this thread, I have wound up with a Fotoman 6x17 with a SSA 90mm. The lens rocks. The camera rocks. It has, however, been a very challenging format to master. I'm doing pretty good with it now, a couple of shots from it are currently in my gallery. I like this one the best:

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...00&ppuser=9455

  6. #16
    scootermm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk View Post
    What's the difference between a banquet camera and a panoramic camera? For example, I've heard 7X17s called banquet cameras, but the nameplate on my 7X17 Korona says "Panoramic View"
    doug
    my understanding is "banquet camera" was a broad label for cameras of this size in the early 1900s and refered to 7x17s, 8x20s, and 12x20s that were make by Korona and Folmer & Schwing (believe these were the only two manufacturers) with the main use being to photograph large groups of people at banquets and such. Korona has that on the name plate likely just as a marketing thing. 7x17 and 8x20 would be labeled banquet cameras and panoramic cameras interchangeable, Id think.

    in regards to panoramic cameras in general, I love them but Im biased as its about all Ive shot lately. I remember there was a neat pano adapter for the Mamiya 645 I used to own basically used 35mm film in the 120 camera to create a panoramic image. then theres the 35mm Xpans, 6x17s, 6x24s, 4x10s, 5x12s, cirkut (rotating cameras), 7x17s, 8x20s, ...

    its fun too shoot in for sure and quite a challenge most of the time Ive found.

  7. #17
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    As far as I am aware, the term "panoramic" was originally applied to the swinging-lens Kodak cameras of the early 1900s. When I hear "banquet", I think of a conventional camera (possible with a short bellows) which takes a plate split horizontally from a normal size (e.g. 8 x 20" instead of 16 x 20", etc.). As banquet shots were generally lit by flash powder in the old days, I would think a swinging-lens camera would be highly impractical.

    As regards modern panoramic cameras, the term seems to be applied to any camera that make a long thin picture, no matter whether with a swinging lens or static lens. I am always surprised that people pay a lot of money for custom-made panoramic cameras, I find a Crown Graphic with a Horseman 6 x12 cm back just great, and there is always the option of a Chinese 6 x17 cm booster back if you want to go even wider (personally I like the 2:1 ratio best).

    Regards,

    David

  8. #18

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    Fotoman

    I got a fotoman 617 a while back, just got the chance to use it with my 180mm lens. Looks like a winner. It sets up a lot easier than a view camera, which I also have, and it produced a couple of rolls of decent panorama's. I have one at the lab for a 7x20 cibachrome. More later

  9. #19

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    Jim, I like your shot. If you have the time how about posting some of your work on the Fotoman Gallery... same for you, Herb.

    When I see a great panoramic picture it always stops me in my tracks, no matter what the format. Some say it's just "cropping" off the top and bottom. I suppose that's technically correct, but to me a well executed pano has an inherent sense of biggness. A feeling of more than what I'm actually viewing. Perhaps my brain sort of "fills in" what might be beyond the frame... a sky, a foreground... without it actually having to be there. Yet within the confines of its frame, the successful pano is whole and complete.

    Actually shooting with a panoramic camera helps me to "see" panoramically. The results being more complete, and more purposeful than simply cropping a pano out of a 4x5 or whatever. I often carry around a 617 viewfinder, just to work my eye muscles.

  10. #20

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    David,

    I have a 6x17 back for my 4x5 as well. I've been pretty happy with it. Have you or anyone ever seen a 6x24 back for a 4x5?
    -Logan Group

    Pacifism in the face of murderous barbarism is a self-correcting disorder.

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