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  1. #1
    Magpie's Avatar
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    What Film does the Kodak Panoram 3A really Take?

    Hi,

    Can some one who has a Kodak Panoram 3A tell me what size film you actually need for it?

    There is one for sale here in Sydney that is in great condition, the fellow selling it says it tales 120 film but all the web sites I can find say it takes a larger size.

    There are also a couple of 4A (? film) and a 1A (? film) in slightly rougher condition, can anyone confirm the film size they need?

    I want to get one of these cameras to try my hand at panorama format but want one that I can get film for (probably JandC) without having to cut it myself as I do not have a dark room yet.

    Any advice or information would be very much appreciated.

    Regards

    Brendan
    [FONT=Ariel]Brendan F Sforcina[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Magpie: adj, of or like a magpie; characterized by the habit of hoarding ascribed to magpies.[/FONT]

  2. #2
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Do not have this camera, but the book "Kodak Cameras - The First Hundred Years" states:

    No. 1 Panoram 105 rollfilm, format 2 1/4 x 7" Manf. 1900 - 1926
    No. 3A Panoram 122 rollfim, format 3 1/4 x 10 3/8" Manf. 1926 - 1928
    No. 4 Panoram 103 rollfilm, format 3 1/2 by 12" Manf. 1899 - 1924

    If you have details of the lens and shutter fitted to the camera, I could date it more accurately.

    Regards,

    David

  3. #3
    Magpie's Avatar
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    Hi David,

    Thanks for that, these cameras have the moving slit lens, no shutter as such so I don't think it will be possible to get an accurate date.

    Thanks all the same.

    Brendan
    [FONT=Ariel]Brendan F Sforcina[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Magpie: adj, of or like a magpie; characterized by the habit of hoarding ascribed to magpies.[/FONT]

  4. #4
    DBP
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    The number used to indicate negative size, and thus film, before Kodak started numbering films.

    1 =120
    1a = 116
    2c = 130
    3 = 118
    3a = 122
    Other than those it gets really confusing

    The Brownie's, Bullseyes, Kodets, and Cartridge Kodaks follow different numbering schemes.

    You may be able to substitute 120 for 105 in the No 1 Panoram Kodak, as the film width is the same. 122 film was available from Central Camera last time I checked, but rather dear at ~$30 a roll.

    122 and 116/616 are the two sizes I wish someone would produce at a reasonable price ($10 - $15), as there are some pretty interesting cameras in those sizes. I know J and C was looking into 116 a while back, but nothing seems to have come of it.

  5. #5
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    Film for Classics sells them for about $20/roll. Check out their website, http://www.filmforclassics.com/
    Diane

    Halak 41

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP
    122 and 116/616 are the two sizes I wish someone would produce at a reasonable price ($10 - $15), as there are some pretty interesting cameras in those sizes. I know J and C was looking into 116 a while back, but nothing seems to have come of it.
    If you have a spool and backing paper then you can roll your own 116/616 using 70mm unperforated. Film choice isn't that great today but J&C had/has Efke in B&W.

  7. #7
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Many users, of which I am one, have made simple adaptations to make these cameras use 120 film instead of 122. This may be the case with the one you see advertised.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  8. #8

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    [QUOTE=David H. Bebbington]
    No. 3A Panoram 122 rollfim, format 3 1/4 x 10 3/8" Manf. 1926 - 1928
    No. 4 Panoram 103 rollfilm, format 3 1/2 by 12" Manf. 1899 - 1924

    3A film is 3-5/8 in width and was made until about 1970, 3 1/4'' net image width
    The Panorams may/probably used paper backing specific to the frame length. IIRC 4 exposure and 6 or 8 exp rolls were sold.
    BTW I have a 4A but (I surmise) when that film was discontinued [per above] the owner installed pieces of wood to allow 122 film, I assume that for standard 3A cameras, to be used. i've tried sheetfilm stock cut to the correct width but it is too stiff to use on spools without staying close to the darkroom.

  9. #9
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Ed, assuming you have at least two spools, or at least one and the resources to duplicate it, the easiest way to feed cameras that need film wider than 70 mm is probably to cut down aerial film. The 9 1/2" size will give two 122/124 rolls (same width, different length for different frame size) and not quite a 120 (could get a strip wide enough for 127 and leave less waste, though), etc., while the 5" size will give one strip of anything narrower. Cutting in the dark is a pain, but not too horrible with a roll-to-roll slitter (you could even fabricate one to work in daylight, if you were doing this a lot, say to feed a Cirkut camera in one of the smaller sizes).

    Once you have the film, you'll need backing; Exeter paper seems ideal for this. It's very similar to the papers used for commercial 120 films, and though somewhat expensive, it's durable enough to reuse a number of times and comes in a width that will make a lot of rolls from a minimum purchase. Hand marking the framing numbers is easy enough, just measure the camera's frame, add something for the space between (I'd recommend 1/2 inch or more for most of these old formats, to allow for light sneaking under the film at the ends and fogging around the pin roller).

    If my one big-roll camera weren't a No. 3 Box Brownie, I'd probably have done some of this by now, including obtaining a multi-roll size Paterson tank and adapting a Paterson or Universal reel for larger film sizes.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  10. #10

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    Thanks for the help Don
    Where can I find Exeter paper? I have been saving 120 backing paper toward an attempt to glue them on a bias to make wider strips and distribute the lap, but that is a grasping-at-straws thing.
    I have also thought about a slitter to no good end- My best shot is to rig a razor blade(s) and attempt to pull the film thru it/them. Again, I just gotta get huevos to overcome the fear-of-frustration factor
    regards
    Ed

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