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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    112
    if you have only a noblex and no backup- horizon s3-pro- and the electric noblex fails your done. when its windy you could have a problem. wind could stop/change rotating-speed of the drum of noblex. that happend to me in helicopter with a noblex pro 150(612-version).
    i would buy the newest noblex. its is said to be more reliable(see at their website). i have my doubts the electronic noblex will survive your adventure. ask the owners at panphoto.com. they have a forum.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    I'd like to agree with both Doug and Europanorama. I've travelled tens of thousands of miles on motorcycles, with cameras -- probably well over 100,000 miles, in Europe, the USA and India -- and it's a bloody harsh environment for a camera. The foam-plus-tank-bag route is the only one I'd recommend: I've had the back fall off a Hasselblad and an internal lens element unscrew in a Vivitar Series 1 200/3. Nowadays I take only seriously tough, simple cameras on 'bikes. The swing on a swing-lens is just one more thing to go wrong.

    Whatever you take, Zip-Loc bags around the camera(s) will help keep out dust from the road and fluff from anything else in the bag. You might want to take a look at www.mctie.com, aka www.motorcycletouringineurope.com (either link will work).

    Cheers,

    R.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    299
    I havenot used he latest electronic Noblex but I regularly use a last generation Noblex 150F. Yup it has batteries so carry spares. Beyond that it is built like a tank. One of the sturdier cameras I have used. I have been using this camera for 5 years and have not had any equipment failures with it (operator failures ... sure). I always carry a tripod and try not to handhold the camera but it can be done ... jus tremember that with a swing lens camera the real exposure time in terms of how long the lens is movingis much longer than the nominal speed you choose.

    You do need to treat the camera with more care than a stanard camera but it is not delicate.

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