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  1. #1

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    Vertical white bar with Horizon 202

    I recently bought a new Horizon 202 and shot my first couple rolls of film with it. When developed, most of the negatives have a dark vertical bar on the right side that begins faintly at about 48mm and darkens progressively unto it ends abruptly at about 52mm.

    It, however is rather inconsistent, in that the bar is bold on some negatives, faint on others, and undetectable on others . . . all on the same roll of film shot at within an hour or less, in the same area, and at the same general direction (toward the west) relative to the mid afternoon sun.

    I vaguely remember reading something about the older Horizont cameras having a tendency to have a vertical flare bar, and what was the usual source of the light leak, but I don't remember much about it and have not been able to find anything with the search function.

    Help!

    EuGene Smith

  2. #2
    BradS's Avatar
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    I had a widelux that did this from time to time. In that case it was caused by the lens action not being smooth. It was hanging up momentarily, thus producing a vertical bar shaped region of over exposure. Some speeds were better than others. Regular exceercise seeed to help.

  3. #3

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    I don't have that on my Widelux or Kodak Panoram, but I do get such an artifact on my Cirkut - *if* I don't warm it up with 1-2 360-degree practice laps before actually shooting. Come to think of it, I normally warm-up my Widelux before shooting too, by rotating the lens manually from RH side to LH, release, RH side to LH, release... about a half-dozen times. I don't know what that would do (pro or con) for your Horizon, though.

    Reason for the dark column: Something is momentarily slowing down the rotation when you see a dark vertical bar like that, but I don't know enough about Horizons to tell you *what* is slowing it down.

    On my Cirkut, I'm guessing it's lubricant that's thickened through the years, and needs to be warmed up.

  4. #4

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    Thanks guys, I'll watch the lens to see if it is running smoothly, or getting erratic near the end of its swing . . . that's where the dark stripe is on the negative that causes the white bar on the print.

    Also, I got a PM that there are velvet "brushes" for light traps on the Horizons and that they sometimes come loose which will cause a flare bar on the negative & print.

    EuGene

  5. #5

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    It (the glitchy movement) is so very subtle that I've not been able to detect it in any of my swing-lens cameras, until I get the neg back and can look at it.

  6. #6
    Shiny's Avatar
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    This may be of no help whatsoever, but... i've been doing a lot of research on the Horizon 202 as i'm thinking of getting one, and found this on a website that doesn't seem to be up anymore.

    Q: My Horizon will not load film - The sprocket holes rip - I get funny looking vertical lines in my images. What's wrong with the camera?

    A: Nothing. You are loading it incorrectly. Believe me, these cameras load like no other camera on the planet. If you do not do it exactly correct, then you are domed to failure. There is a diagram on the inside cover for you to follow. You MUST thread the film UNDER all rollers; the first big rubber one, the sprocket one, and the take up spool. It is impeditive that you remove all the slack from the film prior to closing the back. After inserting the film end in the take up roll, push in the release button on the bottom, hold the take up reel with your thumb, and use the rewind crank to wind the slack back into the film cassette. Failure to follow this procedure will dome you to strange looking vertical bands in the image if you are lucky, or complete camera jam and ripped film if you are not. NEVER force the mechanism! If the camera jams, then you must rewind the film back into the cassette. If it will not rewind, then most likely the film is wound around the sprocket reel. You will need to open the back to cut out the film. :-(


    Jim
    "Well, my name's Jim. But, most people call me . . . Jim"

  7. #7
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    I just checked the back of my Horizon 202, there isn't a rubber wheel, it's steel. That is the big first roller referred to as above.

    After you take your first picture and wind on, any slack will have been taken up, so I'm not 100% sure what is being suggested.

    I have had my 202 since early 1994 and I've run quite a fair bit of film through it.

    The camera isn't the flashest thing around, it's really more primitive but effective photography.

    The wind mechanism is not the strongest, but you wind on carefully.

    I use bulk loaded B&W & colour film, so I load to get 18 frames, which is 6 strips of three frames, allowing me to contact print easily.

    In quite cold weather, think below -5º C, I don't use the slow shutter speed, I get banding. I assume the lubrication, whatever it is, is thickening up.

    I have never seen vertical white (or black) lines on film. What I have seen, is density differences due to uneven rotation on the slow speed setting in very cold weather.

    The re-wind lever is hard to hold as it is small and fiddly, but you just do it carefully and it works.

    The viewfinder is brilliant, the bubble in the viewfinder is really, really useful.

    The accessory filters are great, I find the yellow/green filter supplied, to be very well suited to B&W film and the fitted lens. At least that filter works a treat with FP4+ and/or Neopan 400.

    It is a heavy camera, the outer body is all plastic and not of the greatest construction, but it works. The inner rotating section, seems to be a great big blob of metal. This is where the main weight of the camera comes from.

    I believe they are quite good value for money, it is a specialist camera in a small market, that they ever were manufactured is amazing. Compared to the Widelux camera, which was it's contemporary when I bought mine, it was one third the price.

    I have a couple of images taken with my Horizon 202 in my gallery. Both have emphasised the possibilities available when you actually tilt the camera, up or down.

    Mick.

  8. #8
    Jersey Vic's Avatar
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    I agree that this camera, like all purely mechanical cameras needs regular exercise and agree it's 'hanging up'
    I had this issue on a couple of frames on a roll I shot in the winter after having not used it for some time.
    In fact I really had not used it much at all since buying it from someone that hadn't used it in a couple of years.
    After using it a bit more regularly, I found that this problem went away.
    I have a bunch of images I shot in fairly cold damp conditions in my gallery. No problems on the 12 or so rolls I shot at that time or since.
    Have fun-as many have remarked, it really is a blast.
    Holga: if it was any more analog, you'd need a chisel.

  9. #9
    Guillaume Zuili's Avatar
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    Victor...
    Do you remember our discussion...?
    It's the rotation which isn't perfect. That can happen also with Widelux.
    I had so many ruined negative that I stopped using that camera.
    Hope you solve the issue.

  10. #10
    Jersey Vic's Avatar
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    G.- You mean the conversation where you begged me not to buy the horizion...? No, don't recall it at all.
    Funny isn't it - now you purposely ruin your negatives..
    Holga: if it was any more analog, you'd need a chisel.

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