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  1. #11
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    AgX, I agree with you, but others may not quite understand.

    The Horizon 202 should show an open shutter when the shutter has been cocked and you press the shutter button.

    Without film in the camera and on the slow rotation speed, you should be able to see the blind drawn and look through to see the lens.

    Simple really, not Majic

    Mick.

  2. #12

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    Terrible quality, I just did this in the back garden, but you'll get the idea how it should work.

  3. #13
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Mick, brilliant, that is exactly what I see.

    Mick.

  4. #14
    Trask's Avatar
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    Yes, that's very instructive, because it's exactly what I don't see. So off the camera goes to a tech for repair. I'm halfway to believing that I screwed up the internal mechanism by changing from the slow to high shutter speeds (or vice versa) when the shutter was uncocked. The manual doesn't say you shouldn't, but one of the websites noted earlier makes that point not too.

  5. #15
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    An alternative way would be to stop a swing lens after exposure just off the film, thus blocking the slit. Then advance the film, and expose by means of swinging back to the initial position. Again stopping just off the film.
    This would make a baffle obsolete, but at the same time the controlled swing mechanism (shutter) would need an additional revesing device.

    On the other hand such a baffle, if designed as a coaxial plane as done here, enables to get an additional feature, namely control of slit-width and thus another means of controlling exposure time.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    This would make a baffle obsolete, but at the same time the controlled swing mechanism (shutter) would need an additional revesing device.

    On the other hand such a baffle, if designed as a coaxial plane as done here, enables to get an additional feature, namely control of slit-width and thus another means of controlling exposure time.
    The Horizon, (and Widelux and Noblex as far as I can tell) already use variation in slit width to control exposure. On the Horizon the lens barrel only rotates at two speeds, controlling the High and Low exposure timings. Slit width is set by the Aperture control lever thus varying the amount of time the film surface is exposed to light as the barrel rotates. At the end of each exposure the slit closes completely (with an audible click) which prevents the film becoming exposed when the shutter is cocked, the film wound forward, the lens barrell returned to it's starting point and the spring re-tensioned.

    I'm pretty sure that introducing a "reverse swing" element would make these cameras even more expensive and complicated. And, as for the Horizon, make the beast less reliable.

  7. #17
    RobertV's Avatar
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    You can better take pictures instead of understanding those difficult way how the camera is working



    Best regards,

    Robert

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by MickH View Post
    The Horizon, (and Widelux and Noblex as far as I can tell) already use variation in slit width to control exposure. On the Horizon the lens barrel only rotates at two speeds, controlling the High and Low exposure timings. Slit width is set by the Aperture control lever thus varying the amount of time the film surface is exposed to light as the barrel rotates. At the end of each exposure the slit closes completely (with an audible click) which prevents the film becoming exposed when the shutter is cocked, the film wound forward, the lens barrell returned to it's starting point and the spring re-tensioned.

    I'm pretty sure that introducing a "reverse swing" element would make these cameras even more expensive and complicated. And, as for the Horizon, make the beast less reliable.
    Slit width is set by the Aperture control lever
    WRONG-WRONG-WRONG
    slit width is controlled by the time(exposure)-control lever
    aperture is controlled by the aperture control lever.
    the problem is that the screw which holds the door-opener can get loose. thats why it should be fixed/treated with locktite(half-strong). the position of that door-opener must be adjusted so one can get the full image-size of 58mm lenght. mine got loose during shelf storage!
    lets hope that promised digital horizon will be of topquality.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by europanorama View Post
    WRONG-WRONG-WRONG
    My word, you jump in with both feet when you correct someone don't you.

  10. #20

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    Partly wrong

    Quote Originally Posted by MickH View Post
    The Horizon, (and Widelux and Noblex as far as I can tell) already use variation in slit width to control exposure. On the Horizon the lens barrel only rotates at two speeds, controlling the High and Low exposure timings. Slit width is set by the Aperture control lever thus varying the amount of time the film surface is exposed to light as the barrel rotates. At the end of each exposure the slit closes completely (with an audible click) which prevents the film becoming exposed when the shutter is cocked, the film wound forward, the lens barrell returned to it's starting point and the spring re-tensioned.

    I'm pretty sure that introducing a "reverse swing" element would make these cameras even more expensive and complicated. And, as for the Horizon, make the beast less reliable.
    the aperture lever closes the aperture and the exposure-time lever changes slit widths(3 for the horizon 202, 4 for the old horizon).
    I know both cameras by heart but i am no repairman. i am the owner of the delphi-forums-rotating panoramic camera-forum.
    im my opinion some important screws need loctite to be used. attention: there are special-screws(with two holes which rotate the opposite way. a special opening tool is needed.
    my ho 202 had been rebuild by my repairman here, also widelux 1500-expert. in rangefinderforum i have given detailed instructions how to increase DOF(by changing distance lens to film)
    www.3dreal.tk
    www.stereopan.org
    under reconstruction
    3dstereomedia
    aeropanorama
    marspanoramas

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