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  1. #1
    Trask's Avatar
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    Horizon 202 -- how does the baffle behind the lens work?

    I can understand that after you take a picture with a 202 that the lens needs to be drawn back across the film, and therefore there must be some sort of baffle that comes between the rear lens elements and the film plane. But when I "take" a picture while watching the rear of the lens with the back open, I can't see the rear of the lens because of what I'm calling a baffle in place. My question is why that baffle isn't moving out of the way when I take the picture (admittedly with the back open and no film). I though that the engagement of the baffle might be linked to the little button that gets pressed down when the back is closed so the counter will work, but that doesn't seem to be it.

    Anyone have a 202 who can take a look and tell me if the too cannot (or can) see the rear of the lens when the lens turret rotates? Any thoughts on this topic?

  2. #2
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Will the camera take a picture?
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom

  3. #3
    Trask's Avatar
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    Don't know -- haven't wanted to waste some film if some can tell me that what I'm seeing (or not seeing) is normal!

  4. #4
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Trask, there is a vertical slit and what appears from memory, to be a shutter blind (so to speak).

    My 202 is loaded with film so I cannot look.

    Basically if you put the camera to the slow speed rotation, set the f/stop to wide open, sit in a darkened room with the camera on a tripod and facing a lighted doorway, open the back of the camera, and trip the shutter, you should be able to see a vertical slit of light traversing the round steel section of the rear of the camera from one side to the other.

    If you need more help I can look at the camera over the weekend as I'm using it on Saturday morning, when I'll change film.

    Mick.

  5. #5
    Trask's Avatar
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    Mick - I tried it, and...nothing. No light coming through because of what appears to be a solid cover within the rectangular cutout of the drum. I think if I ran a roll through it, I'd get a whole lot of nothing.

  6. #6
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Trask, right I now have finished the roll of film in my 202.

    Set the camera rotation speed to the yellow or slow rotation.

    Set the bottom slightly longer lever out the front to 1/60 speed, aperture doesn't matter.

    Click the shutter, you should see a very slow rotation happen, also you should see that the shutter blind is drawn and you can see through to the lens.

    As you re-wind you will not see the lens as the shutter is drawn over and you will see a darker black which is slightly recessed, this is the shutter blind.

    Get back to us.

    Mick.

  7. #7
    Trask's Avatar
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    Ahhh, that's what I needed to know. The shutter blind is not retracting. Your experience is the proof. I'd thought that there might be some sort of interlock (as with the standard film counter in many cameras) that meant the blind would only retract when the back was closed, but apparently not. Guess I'll have to figure out where I can get this repaired. Thanks very much.

  8. #8
    AgX
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    By the way, how would you call this mechanism?
    "Covered Cocking"?

  9. #9

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    Hi,

    I've seen it refered to as

    "Shutter focal plane, rotating slit, gives 1/250 s, 1/125 s, 1/60s, 1/8 s, 1/4 s and 1/2 s"

    If you haven't seen Alfred's Page, you're missing lot's of insight and opinion too.

    http://cameras.alfredklomp.com/horizon202/index.htm

    If it's not on Alfred's page, it hasn't been written!

  10. #10
    AgX
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    Mick,

    That there is a relative movement between the slit and the film, may the film move and the whole camera rotate, or the camera and film stand still and the lens swings, is part of the game for panoramic cameras beyond 110°.

    But as the slit has passed the film in a swing-lens camera, the lens either has to make a further 220° turn or swing back to be ready for the next exposure. During this movement the slit has to be covered. This is similar to cocking a common focal plane shutter where the slit between the curtains has to be closed or covered.

    An alternative way would be to stop a swing lens after exposure just off the film, thus blocking the slit. Then advance the film, and expose by means of swinging back to the initial position. Again stopping just off the film.

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