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  1. #21

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    The above looks like someone who has just returned from some sort of deep sea rescue effort!

  2. #22
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Natural ability and upbringing aside, which IMO are 90 percent of it, nothing will make you a better photographer in that last 10 percent except for practice. That means buy film, and shoot it, and print it...a lot!
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #23

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    if one were to use this as a street shooter, like josef koudelka, would iso 800 film be an acceptable compromise on the grain? i read a manual for the g617 online, the gx617 is outside my price range, and the large format lens does not appear to have a good depth of field at lower apertures. i've accepted this is a fair weather sunny f16 shooter. i would just use higher speed film for darker weather and accept the grain, if i were using handheld. my question: can depth of field be a problem close up? if so i would have to be decisive about when to take a shot.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pollux View Post
    if one were to use this as a street shooter, like josef koudelka, would iso 800 film be an acceptable compromise on the grain?
    Sure but you'd better research the Fuji 800z and find out whether it's going to be around much longer, if that is what you indeed plan to use (it is what I would use). Since the info is contradictory, I would be inclined to buy up a few hundred rolls, if this is going to be a long term ambition. And regarding scan grain, yes, in 120 format it's hardly an issue at 640 (which is the speed at which I rate the 800z).

    Let me expand on what I mean by scan grain. Especially if you scan the film, what you absolutely must not do is underexpose this film. You will get much less scan grain if you err slightly on the side of overexposure. Only a half stop or so is what I mean by "slightly." Keep this in mind if you are looking for 800 speed and especially if you plan to scan. You can bracket if you don't believe me. Even if you do believe me, bracket and learn anyway

    In my opinion, if you rate 800z at 800 then you need to develop it longer, e.g. treat it as a ~half stop push. I got very good results rating it at 1600, using 645 format, but it was developed as a 2 stop push... i.e. for 3200. My results, which I deem satisfactory in term of shadow grain, are in the apug general gallery somewhere, let's see, yes, here.
    Last edited by keithwms; 04-12-2010 at 08:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  5. #25

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    Pollux, as many have said here, no camera makes you a better photographer. However having the right tool for the job makes a difference. The best carpenter in the world is not going to drive a nail with a wrench as well as an average carpenter can do it with a hammer.

    Regarding what camera type, film type etc, you don't seem to be asking yourself the right questions. You ask if 800 asa film will be too grainy, well the proper question is will 800 asa film be too grainy for an enlargement of X, and even then the definition of too grainy is subjective.

    As for "street photography" just what is that? Photos of people on the street done quickly and candidly? Photos of people on the street in a staged scene? That is you ask them to stop and sit (pose) for a photo? Or is you idea of street photography shooting what is considered "urban landscape", that is buildings, parks, stationary objects. You need to answer those questions.

    If you plan on shooting candid photography of people on the street, then you are most likely going to benefit by using a camera that is quick to focus, focuses accurately, can be hand held. A MF rangefinder might be the best option there, a camera similar to a Mamiya 7II. If you plan to stop people on the street and have them pose, then you might be able to use a tripod and therefore a camera with a larger negative and even ground glass focusing could work. For a mix of both photographic types the mamiya RZ, Fuji GX680, Hasselblad, Rollei 6008i, etc would be a good general compromise. If you really like the pano format then a Fuji GX617, I own a couple of them, could work well. However for hand held, I would suggest only using the wider lenses on it, or far focus distances.

  6. #26

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    i just plan on the g617 and the gw690 to cover all my photographic needs, and the gw690 has the natural aspect ratio.

  7. #27
    Rick A's Avatar
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    As others have already said, its not the gear that makes us a better photographer, its our desire to capture a fleeting moment the way we want others to see it. The only way to get there is with practice. And lots of notes. keep journals of every aspect of what you have done from inception to finished print. Having notes to look back on allows us to know what works and what fails miserably, not mention everything in between.
    Rick A
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    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  8. #28
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    I suggest you take the plunge and go for a large format 5x4 camera with an international back. They are not too heavy, versatile, and with one you can learn to focus on the key elements that make an interesting image. They are completely un-idiot proofed but flexible (except for sports photography ). You can use them with roll-film backs which are available in various sizes: 6x7cm, 6x9cm and the panoramic 6x12cm, as well as 5x4 inch sheet film. If you bought a 5x7 inch large format camera you could also use it with a 5x4 reducing back (enabling you to use the international roll film backs) and you would also be able to use a motorised 6x17cm roll film back too.

    Walker cameras do an affordable 5x7 inch camera, if you are interested.

    http://www.walkercameras.com/XL5x7.html
    Last edited by Thingy; 05-14-2010 at 09:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    The Thing

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    Film Cameras currently used:
    Large/Stort-format: Ebony 45SU (field camera), Medium/Medlem-format: Mamiya 7, Hasselblad 503CW
    35mm/Små format: Nikon: F4, D800 (yes digital, I know)

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