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Thread: Noblex 6/150 U

  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    Attached is one of my first negatives made with the Noblex 6/150 U. This is straight from the scanner except for the frame.

    Fuji Acros, two seconds at f/11. Developed in Pyrocat-HD 1:1:100, 20 minutes at 70F, with minimal agitation. Subject was low contrast so N+ development was required.

    The subject was in downtown Greenville, SC, about five minutes by car from my home.

    Sandy King
    Really impressive work Sandy...well done...thanks very much for sharing.

    Ed

  2. #42

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    One of the continuing problems I have with the Noblex is viewing through the finder. Since there are no bright lines in the finder the view widens and narrows depending on the distance of the eye from the finder. Does anyone know if there is some standard way of viewing that is recommended to assure that what one sees through the finder is very close to what is actually on film?

    Sandy King

  3. #43
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It seems to me, particularly since I wear glasses, that I have to look through the finder at different angles to see the edges of the frame. My experience is that you can't see wider than what you can see in the finder, even if you need to move your head from side to side to see the edges of the frame, and the frame edges are accurate.

    My camera doesn't have shift, so I don't know how the finder on your Noblex registers that.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    It seems to me, particularly since I wear glasses, that I have to look through the finder at different angles to see the edges of the frame. My experience is that you can't see wider than what you can see in the finder, even if you need to move your head from side to side to see the edges of the frame, and the frame edges are accurate.

    My camera doesn't have shift, so I don't know how the finder on your Noblex registers that.

    Thanks for the information. I will set up the camera this afternoon and try to frame as you suggest by including everything in the frame that I can see by moving my eye from side to side to see the frame edges. It makes sense to me that you are correct about this because my prior efforts to evaluate the field of view by looking at the viewfinde with my eye in the center has resulted in a wider field of view on film than I saw in the finder.

    Sandy King

  5. #45

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    Yoshino cherry tree at Clemson University.

    I went over to Clemson on Sunday with Jim Shanesy of Maryland, who was down here with his daughter checking out some colleges and universities in South Carolina. Jim like the trees and the weather conditions (overcast and misty but dead still) but had to get on the road back to Maryland and was not able to do any photography. I sent him a copy of this image and he suggested I post it. This is a quick scan of one of my negatives. I put the border around it and resized for APUG and that is that. Film was Efke R25 developed in Pyrocat-MC 1+1+100, 15 minutes at 70F with minimal agitation (once every three minutes).

    I made a few other very nice negatives of the Yoshino trees in the same shoot. The wide aspect of the 6X12cm format seems to favor the elegance of the limbs of this lovely tree. This is one of the trees you see around the Washington tidal basin and they are now at about peak as I understand it.

    Sandy King
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ClemsonYoshino.jpg  
    Last edited by sanking; 03-29-2010 at 08:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #46
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    This is one of the trees you see around the Washington tidal basin and they are now at about peak as I understand it.
    Not quite at peak. They should peak this weekend, just in time for the Festival.

    The ones at Clemson were at absolute peak yesterday.
    Jim

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    It seems to me, particularly since I wear glasses, that I have to look through the finder at different angles to see the edges of the frame. My experience is that you can't see wider than what you can see in the finder, even if you need to move your head from side to side to see the edges of the frame, and the frame edges are accurate.

    My camera doesn't have shift, so I don't know how the finder on your Noblex registers that.
    I took careful notes of the exact coverage through the viewfinder today in some tests. You are correct. Even when moving the eye from side to wide to see the edge of the frame the actual recording on the film is slightly more than the eye can see.

    There is a rectangular cut out in center of the top of the frame of the viewfinder. With the lens shifted upward the top of the cut out corresponds to the top of the image that will be recorded on film.

    Sandy King

  8. #48

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    Here is another one of the Clemson Yoshino cherry trees.

    Fuji Acros, Pyrocat-MC 1+1+100, 20 minutes at 70F with agitation every three minutes.

    Sandy King
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ClemsonYoshino2.jpg  

  9. #49
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    Hi Sandy, as to your question "Is this a good camera?", I think it's a great camera. I have some Nikon 35 mm stuff and some Mamiya TLR stuff, and the Noblex with the Tessar lens is the sharpest and contrastiest lens of the lot. It will give you super images. There are two caveats. First, be careful how you load the film; follow the instructions to a T. If you don't, you will have overlapping images and won't get the full panoramic view. Although the negatives are still useable. And second, it took me a while to get used to the whole panorama thing. You have to be close to things because they really get smaller in a hurry the farther out they are. And if you are close to something flat, like a wall or a building, horizontal lines will curve. This can be a good technique, but you need some experience to take advantage of it.

    If you like to play with cameras, you should love this one.

    Cheers,

    -- Mark

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by mfohl View Post
    Hi Sandy, as to your question "Is this a good camera?", I think it's a great camera. I have some Nikon 35 mm stuff and some Mamiya TLR stuff, and the Noblex with the Tessar lens is the sharpest and contrastiest lens of the lot. It will give you super images. There are two caveats. First, be careful how you load the film; follow the instructions to a T. If you don't, you will have overlapping images and won't get the full panoramic view. Although the negatives are still useable. And second, it took me a while to get used to the whole panorama thing. You have to be close to things because they really get smaller in a hurry the farther out they are. And if you are close to something flat, like a wall or a building, horizontal lines will curve. This can be a good technique, but you need some experience to take advantage of it.

    If you like to play with cameras, you should love this one.

    Cheers,

    -- Mark
    I have done enough work with the Noblex 150 U to know that it is capable of outstanding results. But yes, you have to follow the loading instructions to a T and there are a number of other small details that can ruin your work if you don't pay attention to them. And some things just do not seem to work on my camera, even following the instructions, for example the battery check.

    As you point out, it can be important to be very close to things unless what you are after is just a big panorama with no foreground information. After all, you are using a 50mm lens that to make an image that is a full 120 cm wide. A 50mm lens even on 6X9 (which is really only about 85 cm wide) gives an extremely wide field so just imagine what adding about 35 cm to the long dimension does for the Noblex.

    Sandy King

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