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  1. #1

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    How do I identify 11" X 14" Kodak B&W Film?

    I recently bought a Busch Pressman Model D 4X5 camera and the previous owner also gave me a box of Kodak 11" X 14" B&W film. He's not sure what kind of film it is and I can't find the information sheet that I imagine came with the film. The film is in a generic Kodak box without any obvious markings outside of the fact that it was made in Mexico (mostly in spanish). Unfortunately, when they opened the box, they sliced through the catalog number making that illegible. Anybody have any ideas how I can identify what kind of film I have? Does the film have some kind of identifying notches or something?

    Jim B.

  2. #2
    horacekenneth's Avatar
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    I don't have any suggestions but it sounds very exciting. Any ideas how you're going to use it?

  3. #3
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...Pubs/f3/f3.pdf

    Yes there are code notches. You might have to sacrifice a sheet to figure it out, unless you can figure out what it is in the dark.

  4. #4

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    Yes, it should have notches, either in the upper right corner when the sheet is held with the long side vertically and emulsion facing you, or at the lower left if the emulsion is facing away from you. Here's a list and illustrations of common codes http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notch_code

    The notches can be hard to identify by feel, I find it easiest to use my fingernail along the edge to identify the shape of the bottom of the notch (either straight or a "V" in the case of most Kodak films), and then remember the sequence.

    It seems a little odd that you'd get a box of 11x14 with a 4x5 camera, the film may well be high-contrast process film rather than pictorial B&W.

    Hopefully, when the box was cut, the cut didn't go too deep, if it went beyond the outer layer you'll want to mend the cut with some black tape.
    If it went all the way through the film is likely partially or completely fogged.

  5. #5

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    To get an accurate reading of the film-type edge notches without ruining any film you can place a sheet of film over a sheet of white paper in total darkness and use a sharp pencil to trace the shape of the notches and the adjacent straight film edge onto the paper. Then return the film to its lightproof packaging and examine the film-type notches in the light.

    The Kodak Code Notch Data PDF provided in post #3 is dated April 2004. It doesn’t cover a great many Kodak sheet films of earlier manufacture that had been discontinued by then.

    If you can provide a photo of the edge trace, perhaps someone here has an old Kodak Code Notch data sheet that can be matched to the trace to determine the film type.

  6. #6
    wildbill's Avatar
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    maybe silly putty to identify the notches? Not sure if it would leave a residue but would be very accurate.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  7. #7
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    maybe silly putty to identify the notches? Not sure if it would leave a residue but would be very accurate.
    Or lay a sheet against a piece of paper and use a technical pen to outline the notch code.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #8

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    hi jim

    a few more references for your notch codes

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum230/...tch-codes.html
    nicolai's website has a lot of them too
    http://photondetector.com/tools_ref/filmdata/

    good luck !

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    Yes, it should have notches, either in the upper right corner when the sheet is held with the long side vertically and emulsion facing you, or at the lower left if the emulsion is facing away from you.
    To change from notches at upper right to notches at lower left you need only turn the film 180°, keeping the same face towards you. So in the second case the emulsion is still facing you.

  10. #10
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    If it is high contrast ortho, I used to make continuous tone negatives developing in Dektol.
    I did a lot of 8x10 photography cheap that way.

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