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  1. #21
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    ...reminds me I have much more interesting paint drying.
    Oh, I thought you said you had a PRINT drying...

    As I watched them hike, I wondered how they divided the load, one guy with the tripod lenses and film holders, the other with the camera body and frying pan.

    Then they get to the viewpoint and ... wait... there's two of them!

    *I guess they really aren't as good friends as I imagined on the outset of the video... True friends would have brought one camera and shared it.

    *This is a facetious remark, friendship goes in phases where you start out having to carry two cameras, you get close enough that you can share stuff, then you get to a point where you can't stand each other anymore and have to carry two again. - Maybe they're really at that latter stage

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by CatLABS View Post
    Photography is art?
    Please tell me you are joking. Of course it is
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

  3. #23
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Good gawd! Real photography, from back in the day when cameras were cameras, men were men, and sheep were scared...



    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    —Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  4. #24
    Davec101's Avatar
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    Kenro Izu has been moving around a 20x14 inch camera to some pretty inhospitable places around the world. I think he might use pack animals to help he though Someone should really do a documentary on him!

    http://www.kenroizu.com/

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1998MUS9.jpg  
    Platinum Printing Editions http://www.dceditions.com
    The Art of Platinum Printing Blog http://artofplatinum.wordpress.com/
    Alternative Photographic Processes blog http://altphotoblog.com/

  5. #25
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Riehl View Post
    Man, I wonder how a negative that big would translate in... le gasp... megapixels.
    At 4kdpi around 7300 megapixels. Hats off to shooting such a large format. True dedication.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  6. #26

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    Pretty sure that is a Richard Ritter 20x24. Its pretty light for that format..
    But I would think..
    I would bring it to a different place than that..

  7. #27

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    I don't think carrying LF equipment is that big a deal, though obviously 20x24 is above and beyond! But the bulk is mainly in the lenses and holders; if you're only taking a couple of shots with one lens, I think almost any 8x10 field setup could be carried in a backpack, with the tripod strapped on or carried in one hand.

    Remember too that the guys in the video are carrying an 11x14 as well! It seems like if it were just the monster camera, a team of two could make much lighter work of it.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  8. #28
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    I don't think carrying LF equipment is that big a deal, though obviously 20x24 is above and beyond! But the bulk is mainly in the lenses and holders; if you're only taking a couple of shots with one lens, I think almost any 8x10 field setup could be carried in a backpack, with the tripod strapped on or carried in one hand.

    Remember too that the guys in the video are carrying an 11x14 as well! It seems like if it were just the monster camera, a team of two could make much lighter work of it.

    -NT
    My backpacking buddy Tom keeps reminding me... Bill, I'm carrying half that camera.

    This is where I expected to see them pull out one big camera, not two. For a trip up the hill, I guess it's perfectly do-able. But for backpacking, it would take special planning and I would tip my hat to anyone with the courage to do a hike, like maybe the Pacific Crest or Appalachian trail with ULF.

    For me, it's section hiking with 4x5 - because Tom doesn't really want me to have more than 15 pounds of camera gear.

  9. #29
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    There is no perfect exposure for such shots. You choose between the overall image or you aim for perfect fireworks and everything else is underexposed to a point where the whole image is bad.
    Or you double expose. First correctly for the fireworks. Then later after the show is over for the surrounding cityscape.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    —Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Or you double expose. First correctly for the fireworks. Then later after the show is over for the surrounding cityscape.

    Ken

    Yes, yes! The good old trick of masking the lens and exposing many fireworks on a single frame! Been about 15 years since I shot fireworks.

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