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  1. #11
    Sparky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattCarey
    Could I ask all in the thread to refrain from the obvious an pointless sidetrack we could go on?

    Matt
    Okay - I'll bite my tongue and NOT go on a rant. But let me just say I'm american and FULLY agree with medform norm. The pictures are very hard to look at. For me, it's far more disturbing than Witkin is for some of you. Because it's real and not staged.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by medform-norm
    Sorry, not enough American blood in my veins, I guess.
    It isn't so much an "American" sensability, as it is a so called "New World" sensability.

    Similar events occurred in Europe, it's just that they occurred long before photography was around to document them.

    I live in British Columbia, and like Washington State this is a part of the world that continues to rely on logging for a significant amount of economic activity. Our culture and history are imbued with much that originated in the logging industry.

    When the Kinsey photographs were taken, the prevailing values were radically different from the prevailing values now. As a result, the logging industry is very different now.

    It is incredibly important that photographs like these remain, because the information they provide to us about what was "normal" includes important lessons for us now.

    The Kinsey photographs are also a powerful argument for taking new photographs, of current circumstances, and taking steps to ensure that they last. Who knows what people 100 years from now might gain from having today's photographs still available.

    As an aside, I particularly like the hand coloured images of Chuckanut Drive. In essaence, that road is unchanged even today, although the trestle railroad below, in the water, is long gone. I would recommend that drive highly .

    Matt

  3. #13
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    Scootermm,
    I did not mean this as an insulting or condescending comment at all. I am sorry if that offended you or anyone else. I just wanted to point to the fact that as a European I don't share a fondness that seems to exist in America , where the pioneering period and the conquest of the west, the cultivation of the land and the capturing of that impressive time on large format film is concerned. That's simply not part of my historical framework. Of course deforestation happened in Europe as well, only think of Spain. We're as guilty of that as anybody else, which was the point made by the Argentinians in reaction to the pro-forest interviewer. There's no denying that.

    I hope all sentiments are now settled and we can return to the original topic which we all know and love: ULF cameras.
    Want to reach a wide audience? Place your ad here! Contact me for details and discuss your sponsorship today!

  4. #14
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    understandable. misinterpreted. Damn internet communication

    no harm no foul.

    Quote Originally Posted by medform-norm
    Scootermm,
    I did not mean this as an insulting or condescending comment at all. I am sorry if that offended you or anyone else. I just wanted to point to the fact that as a European I don't share a fondness that seems to exist in America , where the pioneering period and the conquest of the west, the cultivation of the land and the capturing of that impressive time on large format film is concerned. That's simply not part of my historical framework. Of course deforestation happened in Europe as well, only think of Spain. We're as guilty of that as anybody else, which was the point made by the Argentinians in reaction to the pro-forest interviewer. There's no denying that.

    I hope all sentiments are now settled and we can return to the original topic which we all know and love: ULF cameras.

  5. #15
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    Fer Cryin' out loud! I'm certainly not righteous enough to "judge" what folks did in the woods 100 years ago!!!!!! Mercy! I'm drawn to the spirit of this person who made gorgeous photographs at great effort! I'd like to be like him. And I don't suppose the fact that Europe has been stripped bare for centuries has anything to do with the blood that flows there. Grrrrrrrrrrrr...
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  6. #16
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Mercy, this guy Kinsey and his wife did some wonderful photographic work. The prints I have seen from original negatives are simply excellent! The 3rd and fourth generation prints from copy negatives look exactly like what they are, only facsimiles of the original images. I have long believed that one of the most difficult subjects to successfully photograph is a black, dirty, grimey,
    steam engine back in the depth of the dark woods. Mr. Kinsey's images of logging locomotives and logging operations is of the highest quality and the prints I have had the pleasure of viewing are as I said above are wonderful. Several of the views I have seen most definitely in my humble opinion qualify on the same level as or perhaps a bit above the "Art" images that I see being made today with the latest equipment. Again, in my opinion he is/was a master of his craft! I would love to have a tripod that would extend as high as the one shown in his photo with his tools. Well different strokes for different folks, I like his work and dedication and if allowed I am going to adopt him and his wife as my
    latest "Hero's" and masters of a very difficult medium. I thank Jim for taking his precious time to introduce me to the Kinsey's. I truly am sorry for anyone
    who cannot see the beauty and value in the Kinsey's well executed photographs of a time in history that was seldom recorded with equal fidility!

    Charlie...............................



    Whoops, I forgot to ask where the Kinsey book was available, I wanna copy!







    .................................................. .................................................. .................................

  7. #17
    ggriffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Webb
    Mercy, this guy Kinsey and his wife did some wonderful photographic work. The prints I have seen from original negatives are simply excellent! The 3rd and fourth generation prints from copy negatives look exactly like what they are, only facsimiles of the original images. I have long believed that one of the most difficult subjects to successfully photograph is a black, dirty, grimey,
    steam engine back in the depth of the dark woods. Mr. Kinsey's images of logging locomotives and logging operations is of the highest quality and the prints I have had the pleasure of viewing are as I said above are wonderful. Several of the views I have seen most definitely in my humble opinion qualify on the same level as or perhaps a bit above the "Art" images that I see being made today with the latest equipment. Again, in my opinion he is/was a master of his craft! I would love to have a tripod that would extend as high as the one shown in his photo with his tools. Well different strokes for different folks, I like his work and dedication and if allowed I am going to adopt him and his wife as my
    latest "Hero's" and masters of a very difficult medium. I thank Jim for taking his precious time to introduce me to the Kinsey's. I truly am sorry for anyone
    who cannot see the beauty and value in the Kinsey's well executed photographs of a time in history that was seldom recorded with equal fidility!

    Charlie...............................



    Whoops, I forgot to ask where the Kinsey book was available, I wanna copy!







    .................................................. .................................................. .................................

    Charlie, Thanks to jim galli I bought a copy here



    g

  8. #18
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    Just wanted to thank Jim for a heads up on where to get this book. The photos are truly wonderful. I don't have but a couple of "photographers" photography books, I think that this one is a must have.

    g

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