Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,553   Posts: 1,544,988   Online: 667
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    1,298

    Wind Stabilizer Kit for ULF cameras...

    http://www.filmholders.com/wskit.html


    Would anyone suggest this for a Korona 12x20 I just got? Has anyone used it, and it works well?

    Any comments or suggestions would be good.

    Thanks,

    Ryan McIntosh

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan McIntosh
    http://www.filmholders.com/wskit.html


    Would anyone suggest this for a Korona 12x20 I just got? Has anyone used it, and it works well?

    Any comments or suggestions would be good.

    Thanks,

    Ryan McIntosh
    Too expensive and from what I have heard a bad execution of a good idea. I think you can have a machinist make you something similiar for half the price and to your specs, is what I plan to do for my Wisner, which BTW is another good idea badly executed......

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    145
    Images
    2
    Ryan

    I have a 12x20 Korona - I've heard that Alan's kit is just too painful to operate - very fiddly etc. My own experience is that a monopod under the front rail (mine has a spare tripod hole there) works an absolute treat. I have a lightweight carbon fiber monopod with a quick release head. I leave the quick release on the front rail and simply clip the monopod onto it every time after I've set-up. It's a Bogen pod, so it has the very handy clips - I just let them all out until the bottom makes contact with the ground, close all but one of them up and finally take some weight off the front rail before tightening the last clip. The process takes about 10 seconds and you have no issues with a saggin front assembly too. I have not since had a shot ruined by wind. I took a couple of shots in a blizzard in February (30 mile an hour wind) using this set-up and shielding the camera with my body (I set the oufit up about 1 meter above the ground to help) - no movement on a 2 second exposure. The monopod set-up also allows me to get away with an extremely light tripod - I use a Gitzo 1325 which weighs 4.5 pounds!

  4. #4
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    I think Edw Weston used a curtain rod.

    And using two light tripods ( or a tripod and monopod ) is a brilliant alternative to hauling a monster tripod.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    94
    I use either a small C stand with a mafer on the end and clamp it to the front of the rail, or if I dont want to haul the C stand too far, just use a C stand type arm with a mafer on one end to the camera and the clamp built into the arm on one leg of the tripod. Works very well even on a very flimsy B&J.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Wilmette,Illinois, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    728
    I made something similar for an 8x20 Korona. I used a 1/4 inch diameter brass rod that passed through 2 fittings that I attached to the front and rear parts of the camera. The fittings had small holes for the rod to slip through, and thumbscrews to tighten it down. I found that it added a lot of stability and the Korona I had needed all the help it could get.

    Richard Wasserman

  7. #7
    noseoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,898
    Images
    17
    Ryan, I use the monopod idea as well. The B&J has a front rail similar to the Korona, so I just used a 1/4" "Tee" nut and a block of wood. Simple and cheap. tim

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    61
    I had the stabilizer for my 8x10 Canham camera; it worked as far as stabilizing the front and rear standards together, which I do believe can be an issue as far as stability and movement for many large format cameras--and the larger the camera the more an issue it becomes. The problems with the stabilizer were that it was time consuming to set up; one more step in the taking of a photograph; and also the hardware that attaches to the standards, the 'mounts' were usually sticking out and susceptible to being knocked loose or knocked off, and being lost.
    I have actually had good success with a very simple trick I use now for stabilizing my 11x14; I have found some very thick and large rubber bands, and I can easily attach the band around the front and rear tightening knobs in a second--very easy, but definitely more stable overall when needed-particularly for longer focal lengths.

  9. #9
    Jay Packer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    22
    Ryan:

    I had a local machinist make a larger version of the Brubaker wind stabilizer kit for my 12x20 Canham (48 inches of bellows extension). It works okay for shorter lenses (360 – 450mm), but I rarely use it in the field. For longer lenses (750mm and 1000mm Apo-Germinars and 35 inch Artar), I use a monopod under the front standard, and a small wedge-shaped foam pillow under the bellows. In addition to preventing bellows sag, the pillow dampens vibrations that might be transmitted between the front and rear standards through the bellows, and also minimizes bellows movement in the wind. And in the wind, the sail area of the bellows contributes more unwanted camera movement than either the relatively stable front standard or the less secure rear standard. Having said that, I stand in awe of Donsta’s ability to use his 12x20 in a 30 mph wind. Unless I have a sizable boulder to hide behind, my camera is virtually unusable in any winds greater than 12 - 15 mph.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    8
    Alan’s stabilizer is hardly a bad execution of a good idea. It’s built to the same quality as anything Steve Grimes (or Adam) ever turn out (as are Alan’s film holders). I used both the stabilizer and his films holders for my Korona 8x20 and the stabilizer did what it was supposed to do. That said, it is a bit fussy and time consuming to use. Since using ULF is incredibly time consuming anyway, the extra moment is not really noticed. It locks the front and read standards together and if you use a loop of “something,” you can support the bellows. It is pricy, but it works just as it says. You can also use any of the suggestions found here. I would not recommend it for every camera, but I would use the stabilizer for older cameras.

    Mike

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin