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  1. #11

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    Following on Matt's comment, you could also make splitter board like we do for 8x10 except it would be for 10x20. That way the GG would only show you what would be in your image. Plan to make another one for the 8x10 so I can get 61/8x10 - a bit closer to 5x7 format. Plan to leave it in the camera if the format works like I want to, and take it out only for making 4x10's.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  2. #12

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    Try inserting trimmed down mat board inside your 12x20 back to reduce the window opening for the back. It will block the light without major modifications to your camera. It will also allow you to see the image and compose it on the ground glass. And if after a while you don't like the 10x20 idea you can safely remove it and go back to the 12x20.

    I tried this for some round images with my 8x10. Still playing with that idea.
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  3. #13

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    I would do the same thing as George is recommending. Simply mask off the 12x20 back to 10x20 so when you look @ the gg you get 10x20 instead of 12x20. You can fairly easily do this with the black matt board and simply tape the stuff in there and if and when you are ready and absolutely sure this is the format you want, you can modify the back more permanently with wood. Maybe I'm speaking for myself being a wood worker but it shouldn't be that difficult to do with wood or a temporary matt board insert of some kind.

  4. #14
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    An up side to 10X20 if you converted your 12X20 holders to 10X20 is using Cirkut camera roll film. J&C sells it in 100 foot rolls. I cut it for 8X10 all the time. 20" cuts would be simple to do and the $$ savings over 12X20 sheets is notable.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  5. #15

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    Maybe with the 2 inchs of film you cut off, you can use it to make 2"x20"s!!! Now that would be true panoramic :-P HAHA!

  6. #16
    Michael Slade's Avatar
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    I was going to trim one inch off of each side.

    1x20's would be much cooler I think. :P

  7. #17

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    It would probably be easier to just crop 2" off one side, and cover 2" of your ground glass off with a piece of mat or something.

    When I shoot 4x10 with my 8x10 camera or 5.5x14 with my 11x14 camera, I have a darkslide that is cut in half horizontal to slide in when the other side is removed. This gives a clean, sharp edge and there is no need to cut or crop anything! It produced the size negative that I viewed in the camera.

  8. #18

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    Take a look at this link to the 4x10 darkslide.

    http://www.benderphoto.com/4x10pa.htm

    You could do the same thing if you found some old 12x20 darkslides or made some yourself. Heck...you could make 6x20 and shoot 2 frames on each negative!

  9. #19
    Michael Slade's Avatar
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    That Efke roll film is pretty dang affordable. At $189 for 100 feet, I can 'theoretically' get 60 sheets of 10x20 film.

    How does it print? How does it take different developers? This actually might be appealing on a few levels here. Just have to find out more about this Efke film, a reduction back and some 10x20 holders.

    This is kind of part of the fun I s'pose.

    Hmmmmm.....

    EDIT:

    I wonder if the 120 film base is going to be a hassle when printing/processing? Is it going to be like a great big huge roll of 120 film trying to curl up in the tray? What about loading? I wonder about the leading edge wanting to curl up and not engage in the holder end?

    Just some potential issues I'm realizing. Are any of them valid?

  10. #20
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Slade
    That Efke roll film is pretty dang affordable. At $189 for 100 feet, I can 'theoretically' get 60 sheets of 10x20 film.

    How does it print? How does it take different developers? This actually might be appealing on a few levels here. Just have to find out more about this Efke film, a reduction back and some 10x20 holders.

    This is kind of part of the fun I s'pose.

    Hmmmmm.....

    EDIT:

    I wonder if the 120 film base is going to be a hassle when printing/processing? Is it going to be like a great big huge roll of 120 film trying to curl up in the tray? What about loading? I wonder about the leading edge wanting to curl up and not engage in the holder end?

    Just some potential issues I'm realizing. Are any of them valid?
    It prints beautifully as far as my 810 contacts go. It's really nice film. I've only used PMK and PcatHD to develop it. It will try to curl but not badly. In a tray I presoak it face down in the water and that relaxes the curl as the emulsion gets wet. Then I pour out the water, flip it over and pour in the developer. In a tube, (you could make a BTZS type tube out of 3" ABS waste pipe) the curl of the pipe works against it's wound curl. With a 40" tube and dual removeable end caps you could develop 2 at a time. If you want to make a temp 10X20 mod to one of the holders, I'll cut you a couple of pieces and mail them to you so you can get a feel for the film. I just rate it at 80 and shoot it. 13 min in PcatHD is my normal since I'm going for PtPd contrast. Once developed it seems to stay fairly flat. It isn't a hassle during the printing.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

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