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  1. #11

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    I vacume my holders before each loading session--that helps. I don't keep 12 x20 film holders in plastic bags either----way too much static-e---- I use dust proof zippered pillow covers from Walmart. Maybe that'll be of some help.

  2. #12
    clay's Avatar
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    I always turn off my Vandergraaf generator in my darkroom before loading holders.
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

  3. #13

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    The other culprit can be dust in the bellows especially with older cameras. About the best you can do here is remove the GG and use a vacum on the inside of the bellows. If it is a very old bellows pull the GG and vacum it out. Now shine a light in the lens board end. Contract and extend the bellows a few times or thwack the side with you finger. If you see a lot of dust or particles being raised, either the bellows material, liner or possible glue used is deteriorating and literally turning to dust. Not much can be done about that other then reline the existing bellows or buy a new one.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  4. #14

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    Feb 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by clay
    I always turn off my Vandergraaf generator in my darkroom before loading holders.
    Clay, just thinking about that is enough to make my hair stand on end...

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Slade
    Got them all flat then made my final inspection. Print quality? Not bad. Subject matter? Interesting. Technical issues? Dust!

    Dust? What? Crap! Dust!!!!! Dust everywhere. Little black specs on the print all through the sky.

    With the digital camera I can deal with dust. A click of the mouse and whoosh, it's gone.
    o

    If there is a lot of dust the best way to deal with the negatives at this point is to scan and correct them in Photoshop and make digital negatives.


    Sandy

  6. #16

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    May 2004
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    Michael, is that the lens vigneting or bellows. My Korona12x20 was doing that same thing until one day I realized that extending the bellows all the way when using a long lens eliminated the vigneting completely. With the 19" lens I try to hold the bellows pulling forward before exposing the neg. No vigneting.

  7. #17

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    Sep 2003
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    Hi Michael,

    Sooner or later you will have to learn how to spot your negs. I have some red and black dyes I use (not spot tone and no longer available). After I run my proofs, the next step is spotting the problem negatives. I guess your area of the country is dry so you may have a bigger problem with dust! Vacuums create static. If you use the vacuum go over the holders by hand again.

  8. #18
    Michael Slade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by colivet
    Michael, is that the lens vigneting or bellows. My Korona12x20 was doing that same thing until one day I realized that extending the bellows all the way when using a long lens eliminated the vigneting completely. With the 19" lens I try to hold the bellows pulling forward before exposing the neg. No vigneting.
    Colivet,

    I am fairly certain that the bellows are not vignetting on this 12x20. The bellows are only 2-3 years old, and so they are not deteriorating, or at least they shouldn't be!

    I do see them sagging a bit, so I prop them up from below if they seem to droop too much.

    The lens is not centered on the board, and the darkcloth that I have with this camera ain't so light-proof, so it's hard to see the corners well and center the lens.

    It does look like it is consistantly 'low', so a bit of front rise when using that lens will be something to remember. Right-to-left centering might be off a bit on the lensboard, but it is not my camera nor lens, and I am not prepared to take it apart and mess with it.

    Apart from making sure the mounting screws are tight and the lens is parallel to the film plane in the lens board, there's not much that I can do to a piece of equipment I do not own.

    I'm going to take the camera apart and rack the bellows out, give them a good dusting-off, see if I can't find a good small vaccuum, clean the camera and holders out, then look for one of those anti-stat brushes or cloths.

    Right now in south-eastern Idaho it is pretty dry, lots of fields are still just plowed with no crops yet, and plenty of wind.

    I am using large plastic bags for the film holders, I'm thinking that the suggestion of the dust-proof zippered pillow cases might be a good one. I'll start looking.
    Michael Slade

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