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  1. #11
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Dan, I too have begun work on an 8x20! I know my limitations! Film holders are a bit of a reach for my woodworking skills. I have just started the front standard and have made some design adjustments for front tilt. make sure you go over the design layout several times before you cut the wood. You know measure " five times and cut once". Well at least that's the way it is in my case. I didn't realize the fact that I needed an additional bracket on the inside of the front rail to support the tilt mechanism and now I have a small 1/8" sliver cut in the front. I could rebuild the whole front base but I am making an early 1900's style camera (Korona) so if I can finish the patch nicely then I will continue. I may have to re-cut the front. Well this is the first camera I've made and it is a joy to work on. What did you use as you inspiration for design? I will try to post some pic's here soon. Good luck1

    Stay Focused

    Jim

  2. #12
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Dan good luck!

    I find interesting the simpler design of the back of theWisner light weight 16 x 20 to be interesting and doable.....it seems it would also enable one to make a film holder that was thicker in frame and thus not such a pain to build. check it out on the Wisner Classic Manufacturing site under 16 x 20 light weight...

  3. #13

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    Wow - is this generating a lot of interest in a very short time. Thank you all for the encouragement. I'll make sure to post pictures of my progress.

    Geert - I've been studying your design very carefully for the last couple of months - your design and craftsmanship look great.

    Jim - I'm also following the traditional extension bed approach. I have a Kodak 2D 8 x 10 and I'm following some of the same design ideas. However, I'm also thinking about some of the "stability" issues that I will be facing with this larger size and hopefully will work them out. I thought long and hard about the design looking at design approaches for both the extension bed and the flatbed approach. However, with the flatbed approach, I couldn't figure out any way to make the camera rotatable for both horizontal and vertical formats.

    I understand your "challenge" with the front swings - I realized that when investigating design options. I'm going to keep that aspect of my design somewhat simple. Front will have rise/fall and swing and the back will have tilt. I realize the potential perspective issues with back tilt, but most of my work is landscape type I'll just have to deal with it. The camera back assembly will also be removable from the back standards to change from horizontal to vertical format.

    Thanks everyone,

    Dan

  4. #14
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Also Richard Ritter has built a nice 7 x 17 which allows for vertical and horizontal use....google richard ritter 7 x 17 for photos

  5. #15
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Dan - what I'd suggest is to first make a prototype, just like Norm does on the New Yankee Workshop, and then have the prototype tested. In fact, there's a ULF testing facility here in Rio Rancho that I'd recommend.

    Seriously, good luck with the project. I'll look forward to progress photos.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  6. #16
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Dan, I also used the Kodak 2-D 8x10 as an example for design. I got the guts off of E-bay for a steal and am using the brass hardware off of it. I'll have to get some more extension bed track and two more nobs. I found a design idea for front tilt from a web listing a while back for a 7x17 that had front tilt that was done by Richard Ritter. I also have a Zone VI 4x5 to use as a guide for the front tilt and I am copying the design. Hence the reason that I need to rebuild the front base. I didn't take into account the extra width for the front tilt. If you are building this camera try the extension support rails to give it more stability. I'm going to build a set for mine. I'm only making mine a horizontal format so I can't help with the vertical side of your design. I'm building the tripod and extra platform to use mine vertical. If i need a second tripod to support the front, well then what's another 5 pounds! Hell, I'm only 55 and still in good shape so I might as well take crazy to the max! What ever you do don't rush it or you will be rebuilding things like I have to.

    Stay Focused

    Jim

  7. #17
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Dan, like I said in one of my previous posts take you time with the layout. When you start changing things it can get ugly. My front standard that I messed up, well I finally, after the second cup of coffee this morning realized that I could cut 1/8" off each side of my lens board frame to give me the measurements I need to add the tilt to the front standard. The joys of caffeine!

    Stay Focused!

    Jim

  8. #18
    Petzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dozer
    After that comes the camera. This is where I may be crazy. Not wanting to limit myself to only horizontal images, I've come up with a design that theoretically allows the camera body and bellows to detach from the front and rear supports and be able to rotate it all to accommodate both formats. Time will tell if it will work or not. Has anyone else ever tried this before?
    So you want to take vertical pictures? With a good ball head, you might as well rotate the camera entirely, and not make changes to the camera. Of course it would generate some imbalance, but you need a good tripod anyway. This could make your design simpler and sturdier.
    If you're not taking your camera...there's no reason to travel. --APUG member bgilwee

  9. #19

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    Ralph - I think I missed the episode where Norm sends his project out to get tested. However, I did see the one where one of his viewers gives him an obsene amont of money for his lastest "what's it kind of table or whatever" and allows him to retire. Isn't that why Norm isn't on the air anymore?

    Jim - Thanks for the warnings. My wife always complains that I procrastinate to long before making decisions. So far, that has held true on is project. I've draw everydetail and thought I had it all down. However, even with all my plans, when I'm cutting things, I still re-think details and make some modifications. However, I did have to re-cut two small pieces the other day. What I have found so far is to make an extra piece of whatever you are making out of pine or something to use as your test piece. That will significantly reduce the amount of mistakes on your "real wood" that you are using. In the case of my "mistake", I forgot to make a test piece and thought I could get it right anyway (lesson learned). By the way, what wood are you using? I'm making mine out of Makori which is African Cherry. It's pretty easy to get on Ebay as rough cut boards for about $1 per board foot - however it cost more than that to ship it, so my total cost is about $2.50/board foot. One thing I'm doing is with the band saw and planer, I'm getting twice the quantity by slicing the boards down the middle.

    Petzi - thanks for the suggestion on the Ball Head. However, I'm already "insanely" committed to the design I've worked out. Maybe that approach will come with the next camera.

    Keep the ideas coming,

    Dan

  10. #20
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Dan, I'm building my camera and tripod out of Walnut. I've had some stock for several years that I am putting to good use. I love the look of finished walnut. I'm doing a hand rubbed oil finish. wet sanding to 800 grit with oil. It looks nice. i put a protective wax over the wood. It is a lot of work but man does it look great. I had to pick up some additional pcs. on e-bay and I found a guy who has excellent wood cut to very fine tolerances. Camera building is a challenge but it is very rewarding.

    Stay Focused

    Jim

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