Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,900   Posts: 1,555,786   Online: 872
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: 8x20 & 16x20

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Basel, Switzerland
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    11

    8x20 & 16x20

    I am a very keen LF photographer, but have never shot larger than 4x5.

    I'm thinking about trying ULF, and wondering if a 16x20 camera exists, which would also be capable of shooting half frame 8x20, without complicated mechanical adjustment in the field?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    1,298
    http://www.wisner.com/16x20.htm

    I'm sure you could get a custom 8x10 reducing back made for it.

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,344
    Images
    20
    The easiest way to do it would be to use a half-frame darkslide mask like this one for 4x10 on an 8x10 camera--

    http://www.benderphoto.com/4x10pa.htm

    It's easy to make one yourself from a spare darkslide (or since the holders are custom anyway, you could have the holder manufacturer make one for you), is much less expensive than a reducing back, and you can keep it with you all the time without adding much weight to your kit. You'll want to be sure the camera has plenty of rise/fall to take full advantage of a half darkslide mask, since the image area is no longer centered in the back.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    325
    Images
    12
    I think in the long run an 8x20 camera would still be much lighter then a 16x20 with some kind of reducing back. You mentioned having the camera in the field. I would think weight and mobility should also be a consideration.
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    360

    8 x 20

    I would recommend an 8 x 20 / and frankly an 8 x 10 (which can be nicely contact printed in and of itself, or enlarged should you choose to enlarge to 16 x 20. Get a 4 x 5 reducing back and you may never use your 4 x 5 again...

    The stand alone 8 x 20 would be much more manageable in the field.

    I regulary take a 7 x 17 and 8 x 10 with me. Some places I shoot just tend to lend themselves better to one format over the other.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    1,298
    At $7,500.00, its a quite expensive camera to just "try out".

    I think Scott makes a great point. You could get an 8x20 camera, which would be much easier to work with in the field, or just in general, and another 8x10 camera for making 16x20 enlargments.

    What are you wanting a 16x20 negative for anyway? Regular silver printing, AZO, platinum? If it's just for making silver prints, doing a 4x enlargement from 8x10-16x20 is not a great loss of sharpness.

    I've been recently doing some 30x40 mural prints from 8x10 negatives, and those are still VERY sharp. Probably the same as doing a 11x14 from a 4x5.

  7. #7
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Vegas/mysterious mohave co. az, Big Pine Key Fla.
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,717
    Images
    20
    Clyde Butcher prints from 12 x 20 negs.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,520
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    8
    tom yanul used to print from 12 x 20 too.
    too bad he closed down his darkroom a while back ..

    http://hometown.aol.com/%20yanulpan/lab.html

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Basel, Switzerland
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    11
    Interesting comments - thanks. I suppose the idea was to have one camera from which I could contact print, either in 16x20, or in 8x20 panoramic.

    Something like a 5x7 Canham, with a 6x17 back, could be a more portable alternative, but you'd need to have an enormous enlarger.

    I just wanted to get to a place where the negative was very close to the final print - something like a straight wire with gain.

  10. #10
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Vegas/mysterious mohave co. az, Big Pine Key Fla.
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,717
    Images
    20
    Maybe a 14 x 17 camera with an additional 7 x 17 back/or you can also just tape down the loose side of 7 x 17 in your 14 x 17 camera...not a big deal really.

    These cameras are made in China presently.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin