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  1. #11
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    That's excellent!! Now all you need is a 19" Sigmar to take up some of that extra space on the lensboard That truly is an excellent find for $300 bucks. Well done.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  2. #12
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Sweet Jesus and his Father...that's a find. You're lucky. Very, very lucky. You better make some nifty images with that thing.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  3. #13

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    11x14 garage sale...

    It was probably built as a copy camera...I have a very similar one, but the front is different. I think that as a copy camera, the rotating front would come in handy to straighten out crooked copy?
    Tracy Storer
    Polaroid 20x24 Studio West
    www.mammothcamera.com

  4. #14
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TracyStorer View Post
    It was probably built as a copy camera...I have a very similar one, but the front is different. I think that as a copy camera, the rotating front would come in handy to straighten out crooked copy?
    I originally thought that might be it too but after reflecting on it, I don't think that is it. The cone of light coming through the lens would be a point or circle starting out and rotation of the lens would not alter that or the position of objects in the projected field of view (though tilting it would). If you look through a lens, magnifying glass, etc., it doesn't matter if you rotate the element. However, rotation of the back would affect the straight line & frame edges induced by the format, which is where perspective control comes in.

    I wonder if it was for attachment of an internal shutter or some other accessory (vignetting mask, filter, etc.).

    I've never seen any other camera with a front like this one.

    Joe

  5. #15

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    The front might have actually been a back at one time? It looks like it has the same type hinge found on the old ROC cameras used for rear tilts. I think someone may have added that front on there but that's just a guess.

    http://www.fiberq.com/cam/roc/emp.htm

  6. #16

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    I meant that the rotating front was actually the copy board(where the original would be mounted), and that the lens would mount inside the next section. Mine has internal hardware for lensboard sized panels in each stage.
    Tracy

    Quote Originally Posted by smieglitz View Post
    I originally thought that might be it too but after reflecting on it, I don't think that is it. The cone of light coming through the lens would be a point or circle starting out and rotation of the lens would not alter that or the position of objects in the projected field of view (though tilting it would). If you look through a lens, magnifying glass, etc., it doesn't matter if you rotate the element. However, rotation of the back would affect the straight line & frame edges induced by the format, which is where perspective control comes in.

    I wonder if it was for attachment of an internal shutter or some other accessory (vignetting mask, filter, etc.).

    I've never seen any other camera with a front like this one.

    Joe
    Tracy Storer
    Polaroid 20x24 Studio West
    www.mammothcamera.com

  7. #17
    eclarke's Avatar
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    At the ABSOLUTE least, it's a nice prop to have sitting around in your darkroom!! The best garage sale find I've heard about so far...Evan Clarke

  8. #18

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    Almost definitely a copy camera. I have a 5x7 of similar design. The little doors on the side allow you to place the lens and board in the intermediate sections.

    Mine was made to make Magic Lantern slides from other slides. I have a Magic Lantern back and 5 film holders in almost perfect condition. Now if only Ilford cut Magic Lantern sizes . . .

  9. #19
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TracyStorer View Post
    I meant that the rotating front was actually the copy board(where the original would be mounted), and that the lens would mount inside the next section. Mine has internal hardware for lensboard sized panels in each stage.
    Tracy
    Ahhh. Got it. Thanks.

  10. #20
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    now THAT'S a lensboard!!!
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

    blog
    website

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