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  1. #11
    RobertP's Avatar
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    I guess an anodized aluminum dark slide wouldn't be cost friendly. Of course you could offer them as an upgrade. I look at a filmholder as a long term investment. So I wouldn't mind paying a little more for my tools. I mean if I'm going to pay 5000.00 -7000.00 for an ULF camera then 500- 600 for a film holder wouldn't be out of the question. It would be worth it if you are on a shoot and you have to fuss with a warped darkslide and miss the shot, or if it is not seated properly end up with fogged film. Some people don't realize that the film holder is actually more difficult to make than the camera. At least they have to be closer tolerence work that is.

  2. #12

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    Sandy,
    probably not cost effective, but I have found .032 5052 aluminum to work wonderfully where stiffness is required (5052 is harder and stiffer than most of the other aluminum alloys, while being relative inexpensive). as a bonus, you could rivet matching walnut or cherry handles to them, or for a high tech look, rout or waterjet the handle shapes, suitable offset of course. Only downside to aluminum is a significant coeff. of expansion.

    erie

  3. #13
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I have a few 8x10" holders with metal darkslides (Fidelity I think), and they do operate more smoothly, but they are heavier than the plastic darkslides, which could get to be a problem with larger filmholders.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    I have a few 8x10" holders with metal darkslides (Fidelity I think), and they do operate more smoothly, but they are heavier than the plastic darkslides, which could get to be a problem with larger filmholders.

    Aluminum is in fact very heavy compared to phenolic plastic for the same strength and stiffness. That is the major reason I have decided not to use it. The use of aluminum would also slow down production because the anodizing would have to be done out of the woodworking shop, and by someone else.

    Sandy King

  5. #15
    RobertP's Avatar
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    How about something along the line of composite graphite. They seem to be using it for everything else why not a darkslide? You can't get much lighter and stronger than that. But I don't know of the specific qualities of graphite and so I can't say for sure if it would work. I'm just throwing some ideas out there is all.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertP View Post
    How about something along the line of composite graphite. They seem to be using it for everything else why not a darkslide? You can't get much lighter and stronger than that. But I don't know of the specific qualities of graphite and so I can't say for sure if it would work. I'm just throwing some ideas out there is all.
    Yes, that is the kind of thing we are looking at. Just have not been able to find a good source. I am going to research this more when I get back from China.

    Sandy

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertP View Post
    How about something along the line of composite graphite. They seem to be using it for everything else why not a darkslide? You can't get much lighter and stronger than that. But I don't know of the specific qualities of graphite and so I can't say for sure if it would work. I'm just throwing some ideas out there is all.
    It's the same thing as fiberglass, but instead of glass they use graphite fibers.
    It's not the camera......

  8. #18
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertP View Post
    How about something along the line of composite graphite. They seem to be using it for everything else why not a darkslide? You can't get much lighter and stronger than that.
    One question is--how thick would it have to be to keep the dark in?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by freygr View Post
    It's the same thing as fiberglass, but instead of glass they use graphite fibers.
    Do you know of a source for this material in thickness of about 60 mil?

    Sandy King

  10. #20

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    Don't bother with the graphite route unless you intend your holders to be the most expensive available.

    My suggestion is to contact a manufacturer of phenolic resin and see about a custom fabrication run. PM me if you want more information on this...


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

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