Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,471   Posts: 1,570,923   Online: 764
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874 View Post
    Michael,

    Sorry for the delay. I didn't see your post. Yours is an argument that I have heard often from people I respect and believe. Using the Jobo for me, though slower than the tray method, helps to isolate me from the chemicals which are causing some allergic reactions even with Nitrile gloves, face mask and filters, and a hurricane ventilation system. If the problem gets worse I would have to quit film altogether and learn that other stuff. Just another factor I have to consider.

    Thanks,

    John
    Understand completely. Make your own inserts.

    Here are the dimensions:

    12x20
    25" wide and 18" high
    3 buttons on the sides and 4 buttons on the top and bottom.

    2" cut out at each corner at 45 degrees

    11x14
    25" wide and 14 1/2" high
    3 buttons on the sides and 4 buttons on the top and bottom.

    2" cut out at each corner at 45 degrees

    Buttons are placed slightly longer in the width direction to accomodate the rolling of the sheet film (emulsion side in) on the panel to put it in the drum. The buttons are raised to allow flow behind the sheet film (really not necessary) and to allow the back button attachments to not get in the way (again not really necessary). Anyone that works with sheets of clear materials would be able to find one of the correct chemical resistance and durability to work. Plastic rivet buttons can be acquired with some simple checking at Small Parts of elsewhere. I bet you could do this for under $10.

    Good Luck!

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Moscow, Idaho
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    36
    Having absorbed comments here and by email, clearly there’s enough interest to make drawings so I can get pricing info. I suspect there are more photographers out there who would be interested in using the 3063 if they could get better results—simply. To elaborate on a few things, while it’s true that some of us don’t have a lot of time to spend in the darkroom, it’s also true that some of us don’t have darkrooms, explaining one attractive feature of a daylight processor like the Jobo. Since the traditional darkroom isn’t essential for working with many alternative processes, I’m loading film at night and developing it the next day when I’m better rested and not as prone to making mistakes.

    I have the demands of daily life and family as well; however, for me, maybe the predicament is reversed: it’s easier to find time to develop negatives than to get out and shoot them, so any technique or innovation that will help insure my success seems worth thorough investigation—and I’ve considered many of them.

    I’ve heard mention of the elusive “screen” material, but I’m trying to avoid use of tabs, clips, buttons—anything that can alter the flow of developer within the drum resulting in a predictable pattern. That’s one of the problems with the 3063 as it is—the developer flows through the gaps in the ridges used to hold the film in place and causes unevenness. If the film is wrapped within another sheet of material,developer can rush in through spaces and at the far end of the drum, causing similar problems. I can’t see that these approaches would improve upon the basic drum, though I’d be interested in hearing results.

    If it were just a matter of speed and quantity maybe I could live with a tray, but there are other factors to recommend the Jobo. For me, it all comes down to repeatability and less worry: precise temperature control, use of smaller volumes of solution allowing “one-shot” development, freedom from concern about damage from corners and other unforeseen possibilities. And, as mentioned, there’s also the matter of toxicity.

    The idea of having six sheets of 12X20 film—that is, ten square feet—exposed and vulnerable in a tray makes me uncomfortable—especially with the long development times (in some cases up to twenty minutes) required to provide the proper densities for the printing processes I’m using. My hat is off to those who can complete such an operation to their satisfaction, but my results with 4X5 and 8X10 were never so impressive that I want to take the risk to a higher level. At $13.00 a sheet I don’t feel like I have the luxury of practicing. How consistent is tray development batch to batch? Warmth of fingertips, variations in ambient room temperature—surely, these must affect the evenness and consistency. The only way to test this would be to make identical negatives, develop them in different runs, and read them for consistency. What I want is a constant that I can rely on and adjust as needed. I prefer developing one or two negatives under controlled conditions, with the opportunity to adjust density as required. Though it may take more time, I’d rather fine-tune a negative in hopes of saving time and frustration in printing later.

    Some have asked about variations that will accommodate other film sizes. If it’s practical to produce this one and sell it successfully, maybe I could move on to other dimensions: 14X17 would require tubes with larger inner diameters making them even more oblong. (I didn’t mention before that the tubes for 12X20 are only .25 inch out-of-round.) The question that would have to be answered is at what point the elliptical shape of the tube would start to affect evenness of development as the drum turns—or would it?

    So far I’ve tested FP4 and TMY, both in D-76, and the results are encouraging to me. I wish I could place the prototype with others to test, but it’s made of mylar and various glues and is nearly at the end of its life. I need to come up with the manufactured version if possible, so I’ll keep you posted….

  3. #13
    jp80874's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Bath, OH 44210 USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,442
    Images
    6
    John,

    Should you get to a second prototype that you want to test with pyro instead of D-76 I would be happy to help. I use Bostich & Sullivan's Rollo Pyro on T Max 400, Ilford FP4 and HP5. As mentioned above I am presently doing two 7x17s at a time in combined 2560 & 2830 tanks. I have a new unused 3063 if you want to make a test 7x17 version that will do three sheets.

    John Powers

  4. #14
    jp80874's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Bath, OH 44210 USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,442
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Kadillak View Post
    Understand completely. Make your own inserts.

    Here are the dimensions:

    12x20
    25" wide and 18" high
    3 buttons on the sides and 4 buttons on the top and bottom.

    2" cut out at each corner at 45 degrees

    11x14
    25" wide and 14 1/2" high
    3 buttons on the sides and 4 buttons on the top and bottom.

    2" cut out at each corner at 45 degrees

    Buttons are placed slightly longer in the width direction to accomodate the rolling of the sheet film (emulsion side in) on the panel to put it in the drum. The buttons are raised to allow flow behind the sheet film (really not necessary) and to allow the back button attachments to not get in the way (again not really necessary). Anyone that works with sheets of clear materials would be able to find one of the correct chemical resistance and durability to work. Plastic rivet buttons can be acquired with some simple checking at Small Parts of elsewhere. I bet you could do this for under $10.

    Good Luck!
    Michael,

    Again, thank you. My goal is to have an insert that works for three 7x17s in a 3063. In conversations here, the LF Forum and with Aggie as a project for her magazine, using the efforts of yet another John she knows, I have yet to learn if anyone including Jobo has ever made a working three sheet 7x17 insert into a 3063. As mentioned, I have been doing two sheets without trouble and without an insert. I am just trying to see if I can do three in the same amount of time without introducing new problems.

    John Powers

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by John Snyder View Post
    .

    The idea of having six sheets of 12X20 film—that is, ten square feet—exposed and vulnerable in a tray makes me uncomfortable—especially with the long development times (in some cases up to twenty minutes) required to provide the proper densities for the printing processes I’m using. My hat is off to those who can complete such an operation to their satisfaction, but my results with 4X5 and 8X10 were never so impressive that I want to take the risk to a higher level. At $13.00 a sheet I don’t feel like I have the luxury of practicing. How consistent is tray development batch to batch? Warmth of fingertips, variations in ambient room temperature—surely, these must affect the evenness and consistency. The only way to test this would be to make identical negatives, develop them in different runs, and read them for consistency. What I want is a constant that I can rely on and adjust as needed. I prefer developing one or two negatives under controlled conditions, with the opportunity to adjust density as required. Though it may take more time, I’d rather fine-tune a negative in hopes of saving time and frustration in printing later.

    After learning to correctly tray develop in a Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee seminar I have not looked back because you can develop any sized sheet film in trays with absolute consistency on par with any rotary methods. I do multiple sheets of 12x20, 8x20, 11x14 and 8x10 in trays and it is a day at the beach for me. I have learn to accept that some folks just are not conditioned to work with trays and that is just fine. But there are no moving parts that need replacement or service with trays.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Moscow, Idaho
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    36
    Sounds like a skill I need to learn for when I do have a darkroom again and/or when my CPP-2 bites the dust--thanks for relating that. It's all about having options.

    John

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Kadillak View Post
    After learning to correctly tray develop in a Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee seminar I have not looked back because you can develop any sized sheet film in trays with absolute consistency on par with any rotary methods. I do multiple sheets of 12x20, 8x20, 11x14 and 8x10 in trays and it is a day at the beach for me. I have learn to accept that some folks just are not conditioned to work with trays and that is just fine. But there are no moving parts that need replacement or service with trays.

  7. #17
    lynux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    15

    inserts in Jobo3063 for 20x24" sheetfilm?

    Has anybody hands-on experiece with 20x24" sheetfilm in Jobo paper drum?

    Would this also require an insert to avoid the back (antihilation layer) sticking to the drum? I have never heard of the existence of an insert for this size.


    ...george

  8. #18
    Keith Pitman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Pine Junction, CO
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    182
    I don't claim to be an expert in Jobo drums, but the 3063 is made for 20x24 paper and would seem to be suitable. It has ridges (about 1/16") on the inside of the drum which would keep the film away from he drum itself. I think my concern would be whether the film would stay rolled against the drum and not collapse upon itself. Perhaps someone has tried this . . . Good luck.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    905
    I'm interested in 20x24 film processing as well, can you let me know if you find any possibilities george?


    erie

  10. #20
    RobertP's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    1,130
    Images
    8
    Brush develop those massive sheets one negative at a time. Absolutely beautiful results and I have never scratched a negative with a brush.Being clumsy and gouging one with a nail coming out of the wash ...yes. But never during development. When understanding brush development and what agitation means with a pyro/metol developer like WD2D... you'll see results that will put a smile on your face. Robert

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin