Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,219   Posts: 1,532,273   Online: 847
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 39
  1. #21
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,303
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    434
    If you're DESPERATE for mounting a packard shutter on a big lens, you can always do what I did... I made a "universal" front-mount system. That camera is a Gundlach Wizard 11x14, with a Bausch & Lomb 1C 16" f4.5 Tessar. AKA big-ass lens. I just have to make a new face-plate for another lens and I can transfer the packard to it. The Gundlach takes an almost 7" lensboard, which is what I'd consider to be the minimum size for a field camera. Nice would be a 9", but that's getting too big for a field camera.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Packard2.jpg  

  2. #22
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,543
    Images
    15
    That's what I call ingenuity Scott, what a great solution.

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  3. #23

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Shenadoah Valley
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    342
    Images
    4
    I made my ULF to accept 7" lens boards and I do need them that size for a few lenses. I also front mount a packard shutter to a 300mm metrogon.

    As far as taping film goes I think its sad that on expensive new film holders there is no provision for properly holding the film down, other than using tape in the center. I can not use tape on the film I use for 30x40cm as its quite thin and easily kinks. Also I don't like having tape goop on the septum of an otherwise nice film holder. I just think tape is a bad cheap solution to the problem. What we need is a better design not the same old thing. I have worked up several designs for a better film holder but I don't see them really going anywhere at the moment but maybe one day.

  4. #24
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,543
    Images
    15
    I agree, a good many years ago Beseler came up with the Negatrans 4x5 negative holder so glass wasn't necessary, I have one and every time I use it I am thankful that someone designed it. I am thinking hard about a film holder that keeps the film flat. Like Dr. Seuss said; "We can do better than this".
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  5. #25
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ventura, Ca
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    1,778
    Images
    107
    Scott, I like your idea for the Packard. I nixed the box design I had and have gone with yours. Thanks for posting it. The parts are drying as we speak.

    Jim

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    522
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Sawyer View Post
    One aspect of modern ULF field cameras I don't like is the smallish lens boards. For some of us, the field camera does double-duty as a portrait/studio camera, and it's quite necessary that it take some rather large old lenses (and the large Packard Shutter that goes along with them).
    That's one reason I went with the 171mm front standard on my Franken-ARCA. The newer 141mm front format frame would have been a little smaller and lighter, but I already had the 171mm format frame, as well as 171mm/Sinar, 171mm/110mm, 171mm/Technika lens board adapters. Plus, as mentioned above, the 171mm size allows me to use my exiting 171mm 38cm bellows with an intermediate standard to get another 15" of extension when needed.

    I use the smaller 110mm ARCA-SWISS lens boards on my 4x5/4x10 cameras. The 171mm/110mm adapter lets me share these lenses with the Franken-ARCA. I can also barrel mount lenses on Sinar boards to use with, or without, my Sinar shutter. My main set of 7x17 lenses (240mm Computar, 305mm G Claron, 450mm Fujinon C and 600mm Fujinon C) are all small enough to mount on 110mm ARCA boards (or even Linhof Technika size boards) I just normally leave the 171mm/110mm adapter mounted on the camera and carry the lenses on the smaller 110mm boards. This keeps the weight and bulk down.

    However, I have visions of super sizing my Franken-ARCA to 14x17 and plan to use my 42" Red Dot Artar on it. That lens is too big for the 110mm boards. It will barely fit on a Sinar board, but requires modifying the flange to fit on the board. The 171mm ARCA-SWISS board handles it with ease.

    So, I have the best of both worlds - small, compact boards for my small, compact lenses, but also the option to use huge lenses as I move up in format.

    For ULF use, I recommend, at a minimum Sinar size boards. Even if you use smaller lenses, the ability to accept Sinar boards allows the use of the Sinar shutter - which is a great solution for using a whole slew of affordable barrel mount lenses capable of covering ULF sizes - without going to the expense of getting them mounted in individual shutters.

    Kerry

  7. #27
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,543
    Images
    15
    What would be the maximum bellows extension for an 11x14, 40",48", other?
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    522
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    What would be the maximum bellows extension for an 11x14, 40",48", other?
    Depends on your intended use. For landscapes, you might be able to get away with as little as 26 - 27" (I think the 11x14 Phillips Explorer has a max. extension of about 27"). This will let you use a 24"/600mm lens for distant subjects. 32-34" of extension will let you use a 30"/760mm lens for general landscape use.

    For portraits or still life shots, you'll want something longer. It depends on how long a lens you want to use and how close you want to focus.

    For my 14x17, I'm contemplating limiting the bellows to about 32 - 34" to allow the use of my 760mm APO Ronar, but keep the weight and bulk down to be able to carry it in the field. When I'm shooting close to my truck, I could still use the 42" Red Dot Artar (which is too heavy to carry around on my back with a 14x17 camera, film holders, other lenses, suitable tripod, etc.) with an intermediate standard and the 38cm ARCA 171mm bellows. Of course, the only real weight savings would be in the bellows, as I can custom tailor the rail lengths to match the application and lens choice.

    Kerry

  9. #29
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,303
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    434
    My Gundlach Wizard has about 40" of bellows. It came with an 18"/29"/39" triple convertible lens, and so I'd just barely be able to use the 39" element at infinity with it.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    My Gundlach Wizard has about 40" of bellows. It came with an 18"/29"/39" triple convertible lens, and so I'd just barely be able to use the 39" element at infinity with it.
    What convertible lens is that? Sounds like it would be a real user for ULF.

    As to how much bellows you might need, what Kerry said is right on. You need a lot more for portrait work than for landscapes.

    Another consideration is DOF. If you want wall to wall sharpness on your prints, which is one of the reasons some of us like ULF, you will need to use relatively wide angle lenses to get as much DOP as possible. For that reason alone many ULF users tend to favor wide angle lenses with landscapes.

    Course, it depends a lot of where you photograph and your objectives. Out west with big scenes where you put your camera on a hill and the nearest object in the scnes is 200-300' away long focal length lenses are very useful.

    Sandy King

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin