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  1. #31
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Sandy- it's a Manhattan Optical rapid rectilinear, an f7. It's in a dial-set pneumatic shutter, all the speeds of which work, and while some are not accurate, they're pretty consistent up and down. I haven't made an image with it yet, but at least in the unconverted length, it looks to be a real keeper. Beautiful transitions from sharp to soft.

  2. #32

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    As far as using tape, the key is to reduce the "stickyness" slighty. I use a double sided tape from 3M that has moderate tack on one side and less tack on the other. The less tacky side is still a little to sticky for a thin film like Efke. After putting the tape down I take a clean cotton cloth and genty rub the tape with alcohol. A few swipes reduces the tackiness enough to hold the film securely but allow for easy removal.

    I put down several one inch peices of tape down all four sides and a make a small square of tape closer to the center. I lay the film down and gently tap on it (using clean cotton glove) to get it to set. I have a couple of half circle indents on the inside of the frame that allows me to get my finger under the film. Tape on that side is a couple inches away from the edge so I can get a smooth lift. I shoot 6 sheets and then replace tape.

    Some folks will think the tape is to big of a hassle, but when I can build several of mine for the cost of a new standard holder, the extra work is more than an adequate trade off.

    Some folks will think
    Last edited by Jim Chinn; 11-02-2007 at 01:23 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  3. #33
    Curt's Avatar
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    Some folks will think the tape is to big of a hassle, but when I can build several of mine for the cost of a new standard holder, the extra work is more than an adequate trade off.
    Jim, what size holders have you made and what have you found better for the slide, aluminum or acetal?

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  4. #34

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    I've made 11x14 and 7x17 holders for cameras I made and also a 12x20 but don't have a camera for that one.
    For darkslides I use a material called Garolite. I use .060. It is a composite that I can get locally, but you can get it mail order from McMaster Carr. I like it better than aluminum because it's easier to work with and does not kink or bend if you drop it.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  5. #35
    Curt's Avatar
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    I went to my bookmarks on McC and found I bookmarked XXGarolite, Delrin and Acetal Copolymer. The problem with aluminum is it needs to be coated or painted. I have two older 11x14 wood holders and the only thing they have in common is the slides, they both have the same dimensions.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  6. #36

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    Garolite XX is what I usefor the darkslides. I do use aluminum for the septum. I have had them powder coated and also painted them myself. If you paint aluminum, you have to dull it with very fine wet/dry sand paper, prep it with a dillute muratic acid, rinse and paint immeadiately. If you wait even a few minutes the aluminum will oxidize and the paint will later flake off.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  7. #37
    Curt's Avatar
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    I have a rough layout for the camera base of 18" square with 40" to 44" of total extension front and rear as in a field camera. The wood choice is still up in the air, cherry, mahogany, maple, a lighter wood or what ever I find interesting or lighter in weight. The hardware, brass, stainless steel, plastic composite, lots of choices here too. It could just be wood and brass with a powder coating.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  8. #38
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Curt, my layout is very similar. about 17 1/2" square with a guesstimate on the bellows of about 40". I have some of the Walnut cut and finished. I'm using the same design idea from my 8x20 by laminating thinner pieces together to make the rails and joining pieces. In the very early stages right now. I'm intending on using as little brass as possible. Racks, rods will be brass and the rest I'll make up as I go. My 8x20 is 14lbs. and I hope to keep this one light as well.

    Jim

  9. #39
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    Curt, my layout is very similar. about 17 1/2" square with a guesstimate on the bellows of about 40". I have some of the Walnut cut and finished. I'm using the same design idea from my 8x20 by laminating thinner pieces together to make the rails and joining pieces. In the very early stages right now. I'm intending on using as little brass as possible. Racks, rods will be brass and the rest I'll make up as I go. My 8x20 is 14lbs. and I hope to keep this one light as well.

    Interesting enough I was thinking that the size is too large and was going to look at reducing it some. I was figuring the rails would have an extension of 11 inches with a 7 inch over lap which would make it very stable. I would need four 12 inch racks or 48 inches and four pinons which is right around a hundred dollars. If I reduce the base size then little changes in the design. With some thought about what I have, a Kodak 2D in 5x and 8x, a Seneca in 5x and 8x, a Shen, a Calumet 4x and 8x, the maximum bellows is 32 inches. Since I intend to use the camera as a land/seascape and nature etc. I can't see needing more than 40 inches. I am giving some thought to a revolving back. Wouldn't that be keen? I might make a mockup and see how it functions. This is where a little drafting or CAD might be helpful.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

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