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  1. #1

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    Processing 12x20 negs in trays

    Good day,

    Anybody out there using trays to process 12x20 negatives? What size, standard or custom-made, do you use and get happy results? I reckon 16x20 is too short on the long side, 20x24 too wide, and 16x24 should be ideal, but this is a non-standard size and would have to be custom-made. The objective is to minimize the tray size but maintain sufficient space around the negative to avoid surge marks and such. Can someone point me to someone who makes trays in odd sizes? I would appreciate any suggestions. Best, Markus Albertz

  2. #2
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Try contacting Jorge Gasteazoro on the large format list. He does this as his regular method of development. I believe he uses a 16x20 tray and uses a soft bristle paint brush, brushing in both horizontal and vertical strokes while the neg lies in the soup.

    His web site http://www.jorgegasteazoro.com/ and he has a contact page there.

    Best of luck.
    Robert Hall
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  3. #3

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    There is also, scootermm (Matt) here that works in 12x20. IIRC, he uses containers from local store (brand name RubberMaid) to process his 1220's. If he does not see this and respond, send him a PM - he is always great to share what he knows with others.

    As Robert mentioned, Jorge is also great to share his thoughts - and he and scootermm both use develop by inspection (DBI) for processing their negatives.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  4. #4

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    16x20 trays are best with deep grooves in the bottom. Do a 3-5 minute presoak in distilled water. I develop 4-6 sheets at a time emulsion side up constantly moving the bottom to the top. Keep the stack tightly in the corner of the tray to minimize scratching - use both hands. Rotate the stack 180 degrees in the trays about 40% into the development time. Rotate another 180 degrees at about 90% into the development time, and finish the development. Make sure you have enough developer for the amount of film you are developing - not volume but sufficient developing agent for the amount of film. A 12x20 is equal to three 8x10s. I know some people do more at a time, but I get uneven development with more than 6.

    I know people who use brush development. I shoot too much film to do one sheet at a time.

    Bob Herbst

  5. #5
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by photomc View Post
    As Robert mentioned, Jorge is also great to share his thoughts - and he and scootermm both use develop by inspection (DBI) for processing their negatives.
    Mike,

    I thought Jorge was a BTZS practitioner, or did you mean that Robert and Matt use DBI?
    Don Bryant

  6. #6

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    Don,

    I could be mistaken, but last I recall Jorge was doing DBI, using brush development. And yes, you correct that he is a BTZS practitioner, so maybe he gave up the DBI for the BTZS....Good point.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  7. #7
    scootermm's Avatar
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    Markus, as Photomc (mike) mentioned I have developed ALOT of 12x20 negs and do them all in trays. I bought some cheap rubbermaid storage containers from the local target (dept store) that are about 15inches by 24inches on the inside dimensions. I took some varying grades of sand paper and sanded down the insides to make them smooth and remove anything that could potentially scratch the soft Efke emulsion. It takes about 4L of working solution to have sufficient fluid in there to develop adequately I've found. As mike also mentioned, I do development by inspection with a small green safelight. Usually I develop 4 negs at a time and the 4L of Pyro HD 1:1:100 working solution is plenty. Likely could get by with less, but Pyro HD is cheap and Id rather err on the side of too much.

    At first I was contemplating buying some of the custom trays from usplastics.com they make trays is pretty much every size you can imagine. So if you want some thing completely flat and a "custom" size, look through their website.

    hope that helps markus.

  8. #8

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    I am doing 7x17 film in trays using storage bins from Sam's Club. They are rectangular in shape and don't a lot of excess chemicals. There is a side bar with photos in the surrent issue of View Camera. To do 12x20 I would just slightly larger bins. I use a presoak and process them emulsion side down as is my usual practice.

    steve simmons
    www.viewcamera.com

  9. #9

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    Hi everyone,

    Thank you for your suggestions. Greatly appreciated! I picked up a set of plastic containers that measure about 13 1/2 by 24 inches (bottom) at the local container store. I am not planning on doing brush-development, so, obviously, I will have to test whether the dimensions are adequate to avoid getting any marks along the sides.

    Best, Markus

  10. #10

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    FWIW I use a 16x20 Unicolor print drum and motorized roller.

    Advantages: Takes less chemicals and room. Not much chance of scratching Efke emulsion either. Plus I can develop film in the kitchen, where the beer is!

    Disadvantage: The drum is so large it tends to roll away if it's not set on the rollers juuuust riiiiight.

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