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  1. #1
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    ULF prints, How do you post them?

    Maybe this has been answered before and if so I apologize for asking again. I recently started shooting my 8x20 and I want to post to the gallery some of my shots. I only have an Epson 4880 scanner and an old version of Photoshop (6).It does not have a merge function. If I scan half and half how would I merge them together? I know some of you photograph the mounted print and then post. I tried that and it sucked. Maybe it was me or my 5 meg digital camera. Should I do this outside in soft light? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Give me all of the details, remember ULF is S L O W. Thanks.

    Jim

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    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    You can scan it in three slices. Create a new document that is bigger than the finished image (ie since you're doing an 8x20, create a new document 10 x 25 or so). Then go back to each individual piece, select ALL, copy, and paste each piece into the new document. Each paste will put the new piece into a new layer. Line up layer 2 with layer 1. Repeat, lining up layer 3 with layer 2. You may need to play with levels a little to get layer 2 to match layer 1 so that the seam disappears, and same with layer 3.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fitzgerald View Post
    Maybe this has been answered before and if so I apologize for asking again. I recently started shooting my 8x20 and I want to post to the gallery some of my shots. I only have an Epson 4880 scanner and an old version of Photoshop (6).It does not have a merge function. If I scan half and half how would I merge them together? I know some of you photograph the mounted print and then post. I tried that and it sucked. Maybe it was me or my 5 meg digital camera. Should I do this outside in soft light? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Give me all of the details, remember ULF is S L O W. Thanks.

    Jim
    You could scan and stitch but for web posting it will probably be much easier, and just as good, to photograph the print with your digital camera. I am noit sure why this is not working for you with the digital camera. Make the shot in soft life. Just make sure to square off the camera relative to the print. If you put the print on an easel this will be pretty easy. If the light is low inside put the camera on a tripod. Import the file into Photoshop, downsize as needed for the web site (generally a maximum of 650 - 750 pixels in the long direction, desaturate and change to grayscale, convert from .psd to .jpeg, and post.

    Sandy King

  4. #4
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Has anyone photographed a ulf print in order to post it? It was common practict to make slides of ones art work for review etc?
    [FONT="Arial Black"][/FONT]

  5. #5

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    posting ULF

    Check out my website, as all images are scanned and stitched prints - 7x17 and 8x10. I use photoshop elements 5, as it has the stitching capability. I use an inexpensive 2450 epson. It works on 8x10 and 7x17, so it should be fine for 8x20. I scan what I can on the left, then the rigth side of print, save both and then stitch in photoshop. Works great. A lot easier than scanning an ULF negative btw. Also, I rarely have to tweak in photoshop to get the contrast/brightness back to the original image either. Basically, what you see is what you get. Any further questions, give me a holler. It's really easy...

  6. #6
    jp80874's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fitzgerald View Post
    Maybe this has been answered before and if so I apologize for asking again. I recently started shooting my 8x20 and I want to post to the gallery some of my shots. I only have an Epson 4880 scanner and an old version of Photoshop (6).It does not have a merge function. If I scan half and half how would I merge them together? I know some of you photograph the mounted print and then post. I tried that and it sucked. Maybe it was me or my 5 meg digital camera. Should I do this outside in soft light? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Give me all of the details, remember ULF is S L O W. Thanks.

    Jim
    Jim,

    The lighting course I took at U Akron last term was a mix of 4x5 transparencies and digital. This course was the first time I ever used a digital camera. For the project of shooting my own 7x17 prints for a show submission and posting here, I borrowed a 10.2 meg Canon Rebel xti from school. I pinned the matted 7x17 print to the wall. I set up two tungsten hot lights on light stands roughly five feet towards the camera from each side of the print. I put the camera on tripod pointing dead center on the image using about 85mm on the zoom lens. The instructor said any wider would diminish quality. Using an incident meter I adjusted the position of the lights so that I got the same reading, within .1, at all four corners of the image and the center. The camera was set for Tungsten lighting, ISO 200, producing RAW images. In Photoshop I cropped the images to 7x17 format. Remember that for posting here the images are less than 1 meg showing on a computer screen. They can't be the same quality as an 8x20 contact print. Hope this helps. You can see the results in my gallery here. http://www.apug.org/gallery/showgallery.php?ppuser=2308

    John Powers

  7. #7
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    I want to thank everyone for their advice. I will give it a go again. Scott I've got your website bookmarked and love the 7x17 paint abstracts that you have done. Are those close ups? Great images and site. I have two hot lights and an easel and I'll try that method first. If it doesn't work then I'll scan and stitch. Thanks to all.


    Jim

  8. #8

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    Thanks for the compliments on the site, the paint abstracts are relatively close, within 4 feet I'd say. If the easel doesn't work you can try the scan and stictch, it really is that easy. I scan them btw, mounted, so it's not even flush to the scanner...still works great. I was surprised by how easy it was. Less than 5 minutes a print to scan and stitch (once you get the hang of it).

  9. #9
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Scott, I love the site in general but the paint abstracts are something I enjoyed. They looked to be close, thanks for confirming that. I'm going to try the scan and stitch also. Nice lighting on those shots by the way.

    Jim

  10. #10

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    Web Reproduction of ULF images

    I use a cannon S80 8Mp point and shoot camera, copy stand, two 500watt 3200 kelvin hot lights at 45 degree angles to the artwork. Set the white balance to Tungsten and bracket the image both above an below indicated exposure until you have a feel for the right exposure range for your images. Edit in Photoshop until the image looks as close as possible to the original print. You will never get it exact. You don't need a high end digital camera and you don't need RAW format for web publishing. I have found that focal length of the lens really doesn't matter when everything is perpendiclular and parallel on a copy stand. Zoom to fill the frame. You can see results of my 12x20 work at www.bobherbst.com. Some of these images were actually done with a 3 Mp camera. Be sure to look at the posted images on other peoples' computers to be sure brightness and contrast are adjusted accordingly for a good image on the average system. You may calibrate your monitor but the average person does not. Good luck.

    Bob Herbst

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