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  1. #11
    jp80874's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oren Grad View Post
    Michael, I've developed multiple sheets of 7x17 successfully in a 3063 without having them pop out of the ribs. But it may depend on the exact measurements of the film.

    The usual caveat applies - my negatives, developed in D-76, are clean, but people who use staining developers have reported unevenness attributed to the ribs.
    Oren,

    How many 7x17s have you run at a time in the 3063? I would like to increase from two in my 2500 series to three in a 3063. Did you see any uneven development on either 7 inch side. I had read from Don that the guys who made the inserts, Jobo Ann Arbor, thought there might be too much agitation at the ends of the tank.

    Thanks,

    John Powers

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874 View Post
    How many 7x17s have you run at a time in the 3063?
    Three. Before I tried it I cut some paper in that size and practiced loading. And in all honesty, I did mess up once early on and end up with one of the sheets floating around. The key is to figure out in advance the exact arrangement of the film sheets relative to the ribs and how the rib pattern will feel in the dark, leave enough space on your workbench so that you have maneuvering room, and load carefully and deliberately.

    I can't say I've seen any problems with evenness in the image. The one problem I did see, with J&C Classic/Fortepan 400, was that the base didn't clear properly and I had to post-treat with a tray of Permawash. OTOH, HP5 Plus has been fine so far.

    There's enough voodoo involved that I can never be sure that any other user would get the same results. But my experience has been good enough that I'm comfortable suggesting it as something worth trying, if you're using non-staning developers to make negatives for silver printing.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oren Grad View Post
    if you're using non-staning developers to make negatives for silver printing.
    Unfortunately I have been using staining developer (rollo pyro) for four years. I'll just have to try an experiment. What $24 worth of film?

    Thank you.

    John Powers

  4. #14
    Michael Slade's Avatar
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    I did one negative today with a 2563 and a 2560 tank stacked together. Turned out OK. I am seeing some film fog that I'm trying to identify the source of. I am wondering if anyone has seen any problems stacking those tanks together?

    The negative is printable, but it's too bad that there's some fog.
    Michael Slade

  5. #15
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    Michael,

    If you think the light is getting in, try reversing the process. In the darkroom dim the lights to adjust your eyes. Put a lighted flash light with a good battery in the tank. Seal the lid. Turn off the lights. Wait five minutes for your eyes to fully adjust and see if any light is leaking out. If you are going to use these combined tanks from now on, seal the light leak permanently, possibly with epoxy with paint or black epoxy. Once you have stopped light leaking out you have probably stopped light leaking in.

    If no light shows up, look for other places in the process where it might fog: loading the film holder, film holder fit, dark slide, bellows, unloading. There are a lot of other places where the fog could have happened.

    John Powers

  6. #16
    Michael Slade's Avatar
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    The flashlight idea is good. I'll try that. I did have my MacBook Pro in the darkroom when I loaded...I thought I had it closed and dark when I loaded...maybe I did not. The fog is on the rebates also, so my bet is it happened with the film out of the holder.
    Michael Slade

  7. #17
    jp80874's Avatar
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    The MacBook Pro sounds like a good suspect.

    If you try the flashlight and need a black epoxy, most of what i see in the Big Box Hardware stores is clear. We keep a box of grey (almost black) two part Marine Tex on the boat for repairs. "Handles like putty. Hardens Like Steel." Quote from the box. I would imagine the mail order marine supply houses would be a good source. Try to use as little as you can to avoid getting the tank out of balance.

    John Powers

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874 View Post
    ...Wait five minutes for your eyes to fully adjust...
    Complete dark adaptation can take as long as thirty minutes. Waiting only five minutes might lead you to conclude there's no leak when one might exist.

  9. #19
    Michael Slade's Avatar
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    I usually wait less than five minutes.

    Here are some shots of developing...

    You can see the fogging in the second shot.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC_0002.jpg   DSC_0005.jpg  
    Michael Slade

  10. #20

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    Thought I would throw in my 2 cents worth. I have been using a Uniroller reversing base and a Chromega Daylight drum since day one after grabbing Keriks 12x20 several years ago. I have had a Jobo CPP-2 forever and have never used it. I have never had uneven negs and have not been able to figure out a faster method to process negatives. I probably now have 9 or 10 Uniroller bases as I find them on ebay or at photo meets for $30-50. The Omega drums are about the same if in like new shape. The Cibachrome Mark II Processing Drums work great also and they come in various sizes which work for 8x10, 11x14 and 12x20. I have several of the Beseler reversing bases but have found them to rotate too fast and do not rotate past 360 degrees. I may have to use one if the other 9 Unirollers wear out(maybe when I'm 90). The Chromega drum has plenty of vertical ribs top to bottom and hold the 12x20 fine and allow developer to find both sides. So for under $100 you're in business. And like the Jobo the lights are always on as it is a daylight cap with light tight slits so you can enjoy your fine cigar as you prepare to pop the top and pull out your perfectly developed neg...(walls were white, now they're yellow, go figure)....Tav

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