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  1. #1
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Developing mats for ULF films in Jobo 3063

    My mat is still in use (film is washing in the darkroom) but I've made a home-grown developing mat to hold ULF films, like the Jobo mats that are now out of production. I ordered some vinyl sheets from TAP plastics and cut one to size (I soup 14x17), with a bit of extra margin. Then I added some small corners and edge stabilizers to make sure the sheet of film stayed centered on the mat. It worked beautifully and I now have ridge-free pyro-developed ULF sheets. I'll post some photos of it later.

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I have never seen a picture of these mats. What kind of plasitc? Is it like a screen? Why is it needed, does the 3063 have just a smooth lining?

    I'm asking because of possible use in a 2850, though so far I have not had any problems with the ridges on the tank.

  3. #3
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    The 3063 has a ribbed lining, so the mat is needed to keep "invisible" ridge-lines from forming in your negative that will show in the final print. The material I got was flexible vinyl like you would use for a cutting board. The original Jobo ones were clear, and had little button-type protrusions to keep the film in place. I've only seen pictures of them, never handled one - if you can find a NOS Jobo mat, they go for $200 +. If you are developing in D-76 or Rodinal or Xtol, you probably won't have an issue with the 3063 as-is, but pyro developers are notoriously prone to the ridgelines showing up in prints.

  4. #4
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Ok, its for you Pyro guys

    Does the vinyl have a texture to let the chems work into the back of the film?

  5. #5
    richard ide's Avatar
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    If anyone is interested, I can produce mattes with buttons formed in them. PM me and I will make a prototype and get someone with a Jobo to test it first.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  6. #6
    Don12x20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    The 3063 has a ribbed lining, so the mat is needed to keep "invisible" ridge-lines from forming in your negative that will show in the final print. The material I got was flexible vinyl like you would use for a cutting board. The original Jobo ones were clear, and had little button-type protrusions to keep the film in place. I've only seen pictures of them, never handled one - if you can find a NOS Jobo mat, they go for $200 +. If you are developing in D-76 or Rodinal or Xtol, you probably won't have an issue with the 3063 as-is, but pyro developers are notoriously prone to the ridgelines showing up in prints.

    Scott - I have Jobo USA inserts (that's what Jobo USA called them)- two for 7x17 (enables pairs of 7x17 to be developed) and two for 12x20 (single sheet). They are a vacuum formed clear plastic - fairly thick, and I was told that they were built solely by Jobo USA in the upper midwest..

    The vacuum forming process gave small round raised plateaus where plastic pins were inserted. This design allowed the film to ride about 3/8 inch above the clear sheet while the drum was rotated with solution . When the solution is drained and you remove the insert, you'll find the film is sitting on the insert surface.
    The inserts are tight fitting into the 3063 drum, with the ends meeting at an exact fit when inserted. The vacuum forming process also gave them a natural curl - they normally sit curved when removed from the drum, and I find that I need to weight them on 4 corners to be able to easily insert the film into the insert prior to putting into the 3063.

    Hope this helps.

    The inserts weren't cheap when sold by Jobo USA - about $250.00 each.

    Its easy to build your own inserts with clear plastic sheeting and plastic snaps from a sewing store. I'm looking forward to seeing pictures of your mats.

  7. #7
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Don-

    My mat is the inexpensive solution to the Jobo mat. As far as I can tell, it works just as well, with the film in contact with the slightly textured but bumpless sheet of vinyl. The results will be proven when I've had a chance to print something from it. I didn't need plastic snaps to hold the film in place- just some bits of scrap vinyl and some vinyl epoxy to hold them down. I purposefully left the mat small enough that it would have an open side (inserted in the drum, it forms a U rather than an O), to make sure the chemistry doesn't get trapped behind the mat when poured into the drum.

  8. #8
    Denis P.'s Avatar
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    See also here:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/2...rint-drum.html

    and here:
    http://www.galerie-photo.com/porte-film-jobo.html
    DIY solution with lots of photos and instructions (in French)



 

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