Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 74,525   Posts: 1,645,719   Online: 779
      
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    17

    Lifting drop bed for shots?

    A discussion and photo appears in the Voigtlander 1928 catalog of raising the drop bed for architecture shots. Is there a name for this in English?

    Since these cameras have knobs to raise or lower the lens for shift, when would a person want to raise the drop bed?

    How is this different from ordinary shift?

    This technique must do a tilt like number on focus, but the photo examples look more like shift.

    Any thoughts?

    Does anyone do this today?

    Here is a image of the page:

    John
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 15845464777_275969d537_b.jpg  

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,806
    Images
    35
    Possibly that model camera didn't have any or enough front rise to correct the shot. It's definitely a good trick to remember.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  3. #3
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,660
    Many would look at that and call it back tilt.

  4. #4
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,647
    At view cameras a oblique raising of the base and tilting the front and rear standard vertical again, such operation is called indirect vertical shift. (At cameras that yield direct shift, both types of shifting can be combined.)

    That operation proposed by Voigtländer I consider a indirect shift too, though the front standard no longer is vertical. But at at least with architecture the idea behind indirect shifting would come true nonetheless. And in addition it yields the benefit to use a lens with an image circle too small for proper (vertical) shifting.
    Last edited by AgX; 12-16-2014 at 08:11 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5
    darkosaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,333
    Images
    4
    Anybody tried this on meduim format folders?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    Large Format Pan
    Posts
    12
    This thread is difficult to follow because some of the terminology is wrong. Raising or lowering either standard is "rise & fall". "Shift" is moving a standard to the right or left. Pivoting a standard to the left or right is "swing" and tilting a standard forward or back is "tilt". These terms have been in use for at least 100 years, and are unambiguous. If your drop bed is raised and the front standard is corrected back to a vertical position, it is "rise". If the front standard is not corrected back to vertical it is "tilt".

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    890
    Images
    45
    The diagram on the extreme right of the document looks about right for photographing a ceiling. It is an effective front tilt, though in the reverse direction from the more common direction for landscapes. The main benefit looks to be because a) there is no actual front rise, or b) the optical axis need to be kept centered on the film.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  8. #8
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,647
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Meacham View Post
    This thread is difficult to follow because some of the terminology is wrong. Raising or lowering either standard is "rise & fall". "Shift" is moving a standard to the right or left. Pivoting a standard to the left or right is "swing" and tilting a standard forward or back is "tilt". These terms have been in use for at least 100 years, and are unambiguous. If your drop bed is raised and the front standard is corrected back to a vertical position, it is "rise". If the front standard is not corrected back to vertical it is "tilt".
    But your latter example incorporates also a rise.

    Thus you are being ambiguous too....


    The classic tilt would not incorparote an upward movement of the lens.
    The many different mechanical approaches, leading to various pivoting axes and movements make it difficult to apply a standard terminology.
    Last edited by AgX; 01-01-2015 at 07:33 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: grammar

  9. #9
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,806
    Images
    35
    Looking closer at the examples in the publication, it is back tilt. The illustrations show converging line correction with this method. The camera is tilted upward to capture the image, causing converging lines. The back is tilted in the proper direction to correct. I stand corrected on my comment of front rise.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin